National Weather Service Alabama

National Weather Service

Unseasonably cool temperatures for July set new record lows across Alabama.

Forecasters say Mobile broke a 128-year-old record with a low temperature of 64 degrees early Thursday. The National Weather Service says the low was 1 degree cooler than the low of 65 degrees set in 1886.

But Mobile wasn't alone.

The weather service says records were also set in Anniston with 58 degrees and Birmingham with 60 degrees.

National Weather Service

Temperatures plunged into the teens across much of Alabama, but forecasters say a blast of potentially colder air is on the way.

Low temperatures hit 16 degrees in Decatur and 17 degrees in Huntsville early Friday morning -- some of the lowest marks in Alabama Friday.

http://www.srh.noaa.gov/hun/

Forecasters are warning of dangerous heat in parts of northern Alabama.

   The National Weather Service issued a heat advisory for nine counties, including the cities of Athens, Cullman, Decatur, Florence, Huntsville and surrounding areas.

   Forecasters project that temperatures will soar into the mid and upper 90s in the area on Wednesday afternoon and early evening.

   The heat advisory is set to run from 1 p.m. Wednesday through 7 p.m. Wednesday.

UPDATE: Birmingham Mayor William Bell said there are no reports of injuries from severe weather that damaged roofs and broke windows in one part of the city.

The severe weather struck about 4:45 a.m. Monday in the area around Finley Avenue. Residents reported seeing a funnel cloud, but the mayor said officials have not yet confirmed if it was a tornado. He said the city is providing tarps to residents whose roofs were damaged.

Forecasters say 2012 is a below-average year for tornadoes in Alabama, at least so far.

While Alabama has 40 tornadoes in an average year, the National Weather Service says only 32 tornadoes occurred in the state through Thanksgiving.

If no more twisters occur this year, 2012 will end with the state's lowest tornado total since 1999, when 23 occurred. But November and December are considered a secondary tornado season for the state.

www.srh.noaa.gov / The National Weather Service

Forecasters say north Alabama remains under a flood threat following storms that will dump as much as 7 inches of rain on the region before they leave the state.

Heavy downpours caused flooding in northwest Alabama on Monday, and the weather service says northeast Alabama is now most at risk.

Forecasters have issued a flood warning that includes all or parts of Colbert, DeKalb, Jackson, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, Marshall and Morgan counties.