Milton McGregor

Former Alabama law enforcement secretary Spencer Collier is suing Governor Robert Bentley for wrongful termination and defamation.

Collier was fired for allegedly misusing state funds, according to Gov. Bentley and interim Alabama Law Enforcement Agency head Stan Stabler. Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange is currently reviewing that accusation. Collier had been placed on medical leave by the governor about a month prior for what was described as an upcoming back surgery.

After an unusual shooting death of a 36-year-old woman by Auburn police over the weekend, the woman’s parents are sharply criticizing law enforcement and pursuing legal action.

Michael and Terry Boarts say they called authorities to help get their daughter Melissa to a mental hospital, but the officers shot her instead.

Terry Boarts says she called police Sunday, saying her daughter was driving on a highway, had a knife and was threatening to kill herself. She says her daughter had been diagnosed as a bipolar manic depressive.

VictoryLand owner Milton McGregor says he will reopen his casino later this year despite losing a three-year legal battle over the legality of electronic bingo machines.

McGregor hopes to have the casino open by early summer.

McGregor criticized last week's Alabama Supreme Court ruling that electronic gambling machines that had been seized are illegal.  The court ruled that the state could keep 1,615 gambling machines seized from VictoryLand in a 2013 raid.

Alabama is drying out and cleaning up from tornadoes that hit Christmas night. Flooding is also a concern as the state heads toward the New Year’s holiday.

The National Weather Service confirmed an EF-0 tornado hit Tuscaloosa County Friday afternoon with winds of seventy five miles per hour. Two hours later, a confirmed EF-2 twister touched down in suburban Birmingham. That storm is confirmed to have damaged more than 70 structures, from minor damage to total destruction.

A lawyer for VictoryLand owner Milton McGregor says he hopes to have the casino reopened by Christmas, despite a court order allowing the state to keep his seized gambling machines.

McGregor's attorney Joe Espy says VictoryLand will have to obtain new machines in order to reopen. However, Espy believes the casino will be able to do that.

The state has been in a long-running legal battle over the slot machine look-alikes.

The attorney general's office seized over 1600 electronic bingo machines and $260,000 in cash during a 2013 raid at VictoryLand.

PCI Gaming / Poarch Band of Creek Indians

Gambling operators say the state is overstepping its bounds by trying to shut down four casinos in Alabama.

The Poarch Band of Creek Indians says the state lacks the power to shut down its three electronic bingo operations in Atmore, Montgomery and Wetumpka.

The state filed suit Tuesday claiming the gambling centers are illegal.

And an attorney for VictoryLand owner Milton McGregor says the state's raid on the east Alabama casino is improper. McGregor lawyer Joe Espy says no court has ever ruled that VictoryLand's machines are illegal.

The sheriff of Macon County is planning to inspect new gambling machines being installed in VictoryLand in anticipation of the casino reopening soon.

An attorney for VictoryLand owner Milton McGregor said Sheriff David Warren will be at the casino in Shorter on Wednesday afternoon.

VictoryLand was once Alabama's largest casino with more than 6,000 games. It shut down in 2010 under pressure from the governor's gambling task force. The casino maintained that its games were legal electronic bingo, but the task force labeled them illegal slots.

Attorneys say a $64 million court judgment against VictoryLand casino in Macon County and its owner, Milton McGregor, won't be affected by the Macon County sheriff being dropped from the litigation.

Lucky Palace and 15 charities sued VictoryLand, McGregor and Sheriff David Warren, alleging they worked together to keep a second casino from being built in the central Alabama county to compete with VictoryLand. A jury in May returned a $64 million verdict against McGregor and VictoryLand. It ruled the sheriff misinterpreted the county's rules for electronic bingo.