military

The state of Alabama is taking part in Super Tuesday and the SEC primary election today, and some of the ballots being counted this year are a little special.

The Alabama Secretary of State’s office teamed up with America’s armed services to make Alabama the first state in the country to accept online votes from military members deployed overseas. Election officials tested the system out with Montgomery’s municipal election last year and they say it’s ready for Super Tuesday.

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill says voting for deployed soldiers used to be a hassle.

The Governor's Office

Alabama has several new laws taking effect Monday, including one allowing the state parole board to issue posthumous pardons for the Scottsboro Boys.

The founder of the Scottsboro Boys Museum, Sheila Washington, says paperwork will be filed soon asking the board to issue pardons removing rape convictions that occurred more than 80 years ago. She says pardons would mean shame is gone from the names of the Scottsboro Boys.

State of Alabama

Gov. Robert Bentley has joined with legislators and military leaders to celebrate the enactment of three state laws designed to make Alabama more military friendly.

Bentley conducted ceremonial signings for the laws Thursday at the Capitol.

Alabama National Guard Investigated for Improper Travel

Jul 22, 2012
photo of military plane - KC-135 Stratotanker
U.S. Air Force / Wikimedia Commons

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) —

The Alabama National Guard has launched an investigation into a recent deployment from Birmingham to England to determine whether guard personnel improperly took relatives along on military aircraft.

The Birmingham News reports Berryhill has confirmed the investigation. The guard declined to elaborate on the nature of the allegations.

At issue are members of the 117th Air Refueling Wing based at Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport.

Gay Pride Marchers In San Diego To Make History

Jul 20, 2012

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Ten members of the U.S. military who were involved in the Secret Service prostitution scandal have received punishment but will not face criminal charges.

NPR's Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Those disciplined include seven soldiers and two Marines. They received administrative punishment that could include penalties such as loss of pay.

"Another Air Force member has been reprimanded and investigations are continuing against two Navy sailors.

"Officials say there will be no criminal charges.