lethal injection

Alabama death row inmates are seeking alternative methods for execution. APR student reporter Parker Branton reports on their latest arguments.

Death row inmate Tommy Arthur says he’d rather face a firing squad rather than undergo lethal injection in Alabama.

He and Anthony Boyd are pleading their case to change their method of execution. They join five other death row inmates who have filed lawsuits claiming the state’s current three-drug lethal injection protocol for executions as cruel and unusual punishment under the United States constitution.


A federal judge says the state of Alabama may not use a large dose of a sedative to execute five death row inmates.

U.S. District Judge William Keith Watkins issued an order Thursday denying the state's requests to dismiss lawsuits from five inmates who have challenged Alabama three-drug lethal injection procedure. The inmates were asked to present alternative means of execution and among other things suggested single doses of midazolam in amended complaints.

NASA Auburn
Auburn University

Auburn University has entered into a Space Act Agreement with NASA to explore and advance the applications of additive manufacturing, better known as 3D printing.

The act was signed yesterday by Dr. John Mason, Auburn's vice president for research and economic development, along with Patrick Scheuermann, director of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville.

The agreement will allow Auburn students to engage in NASA's missions and opportunities, investigate and develop technologies and share NASA facilities and technical expertise.

Alabama wants to move forward with executions using lethal injection. The move comes following the U.S. Supreme Court upholding the use of a drug that Alabama plans to begin using in capitol punishment.

The state attorney general's office asked a federal judge in U.S. District Court Monday to dismiss a death row inmate's lawsuit. Tommy Arthur claims the sedative midazolam is ineffective.

The U.S. Supreme Court passed a sweeping ruling Friday effectively legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide, but not everyone has been able to benefit. APR’s Alex AuBuchon has more on one Tuscaloosa couple’s struggle to get married.

“Hi. We’d like to request a marriage license…”

We met Jennifer Kenney and Hali Felt on Friday. The Tuscaloosa couple wanted to join the thousands of happy couples marrying after the Supreme Court’s ruling, but they were told they’d have to wait.


MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama lawmakers are trying to shield the identities of companies that provide the state with execution drugs, but even without it, the Alabama Department of Corrections releases little information about the process of putting a person the death.

The prison system declined to release the suppliers and other information about the process of execution. The Associated Press requested information about drug purchases, as well as the execution protocol, including the procedures to make sure an inmate is unconscious.

Floridians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty

Attorneys for an Alabama death row inmate have filed a federal lawsuit arguing that the state's new lethal injection drug combination has never been tried on any prisoner in the United States and amounts to cruel and unusual punishment.

Attorneys for Christopher Lee Price filed the suit Wednesday night. It asks a federal judge to block the state from using the new, three-drug combination. The state prison system developed the combination after running out of one of the drugs in its old execution protocol.

Alabama State House
Trance Mist / Flickr

Alabama lawmakers are getting close to approving a bill that would keep secret the identities of manufacturers and suppliers of lethal injection drugs used in state executions.

The Senate Health Committee approved the legislation Wednesday in a 7-0 vote. It now moves to the Alabama Senate floor.

Rep. Lynn Greer, a Rogersville Republican, says states are struggling to get execution drugs because pharmacies and companies fear lawsuits and backlash from death penalty opponents.


Alabama lawmakers are seeking to keep secret the manufacturers and suppliers of the drugs used in lethal injection executions.

The House Judiciary Committee approved the bill Tuesday.

The bill would require the state to keep the identities of people and companies who provide the drugs to the state confidential.

Rogersville Republican Lynn Greer says the state needs to make sure it can continue to obtain the lethal injection drugs.