Joyce Vance

This week marks the beginning of a new political era – and the end of another.

Not just in Washington, either. A new administration also brings turnover at the state level. U.S. Attorney Joyce White Vance joins us today, on her final day as the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. She announced her intent to retire last week, and spoke with us about her eight years serving as the head law enforcement official for Alabama's northern district.

Joyce White Vance
Wikimedia

U.S. Attorney Joyce White Vance has announced her intent to retire from the Department of Justice.

Vance, whose district includes the 31 northernmost counties of Alabama, announced yesterday that her last day as U.S. Attorney will be Jan. 19.

Vance has spent 25 years as a federal prosecutor and was one of the first five U.S. Attorneys nominated by President Barack Obama. The Senate unanimously confirmed her nomination in 2009.

Before that, Vance spent 18 years in the federal prosecutor's office, last serving as chief of its Appellate Division.

Jefferson County and the U.S. Attorney’s Offices for North and Central Alabama have come to a settlement on voting access for the disabled.

An investigation began nationwide earlier this year with combined efforts from the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the U.S. Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division.

Joyce White Vance is the U.S. Attorney for the northern district of Alabama. She says they checked 36 polling sites in Jefferson County, and had a lot of work to do.

Federal prosecutors are recommending a lengthy prison term for a former nonprofit official convicted in a multi-million dollar fraud scheme.

U.S. Attorney Joyce Vance has recommended a 27 year prison sentence for 53-year-old former nonprofit healthcare CEO Jonathan Dunning.

Dunning was convicted in June on 98 counts including conspiracy, wire fraud, bank fraud and money laundering.

Stan Ingold

For many prisoners at the Limestone Correctional Facility, the heavy bang of a steel gate is the first thing they hear when they enter the Alabama prison system. It’s also the last thing when they come out.

         “They give you a bus ticket and a check for ten dollars and they say “Have a nice life.”

That’s Brenda Lee Kennedy. She was incarcerated in the Montgomery Work Release Center for nearly five and half years before being released in November of last year.

Joyce White Vance
Wikimedia

The U.S. attorney in Birmingham says her office is monitoring allegations of racial discrimination and segregation within the sorority and fraternity system at the University of Alabama.

U.S. Attorney Joyce Vance tells The Associated Press her staff is looking at federal laws and talking with "a lot" of people in Tuscaloosa. The office has a unit dedicated to enforcement of civil rights laws.

Vance said Thursday it appears the university community is trying to transform itself, and she hopes that progress continues.

Justice Dept. Opens Civil Rights Unit In Alabama

Aug 21, 2012
Joyce White Vance
Wikimedia

The Justice Department is establishing a civil rights unit in Alabama after the state's crackdown on illegal immigration raised broader concerns about compliance with federal laws. Assistant U.S. Attorney Tom Perez said Tuesday fewer than 10 such units are located around the country. The nearest is in Memphis, Tennessee. Perez said the move is meant to ensure that the federal government has a continuing eye on civil rights issues in Alabama, which was a hotbed of unrest during the civil rights movement 50 years ago. The U.S.