Immigration

en.wikipedia.org

 Alabama residents have split opinions on whether immigrant children crossing into the United States should be housed at Maxwell Air Force Base.

Officials at the Federal Emergency Management Agency notified Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley's office this week that Maxwell is under consideration for housing the influx of immigrant minors arriving in the country.

en.wikipedia.org

Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery could house immigrant children.

A spokeswoman for Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says the federal government has notified the governor that Maxwell is being considered. Communications Director Jennifer Ardis says the governor's chief of staff got a call from the Federal Emergency Management Agency late Wednesday afternoon. She said it's not known how many children could be placed or how soon they might be placed

The Montgomery Advertiser

The Southern Poverty Law Center has warned 96 Alabama school systems that they are violating federal guidelines by discouraging enrollment based on immigration status.

The group sent a letter to state schools Superintendent Tommy Bice. SPLC attorney Jay Singh said Thursday that all children have a right to attend public schools regardless of immigration status.

The letter asks Bice to ensure that all schools comply with federal mandates by the start of the 2014-15 school year.

George Bush Presidential Library and Museum / Wikimedia Commons

The Mexican government is reviewing a labor union's complaint that Alabama's crackdown on illegal immigrants violates an international trade agreement.

An official with Mexico's labor department confirms the review in a letter released Thursday by the group that filed the complaint, the Service Employees International Union.

The labor organization and a Mexican attorneys group filed a complaint in April.

Alabama's Homeland Security Steadily Losing Funds

Aug 23, 2012
http://www.dhs.alabama.gov/ / Ala. Department of Homeland Security

Officials with Alabama's Department of Homeland Security say the agency has been steadily losing funds during the past decade. The department's federal funding this year is less than one-tenth of what it was in 2003. Department officials say state funding — $374,000 this year — is used mostly to meet the demands of Alabama's immigration law. State-level homeland security departments sprang up across the U.S. in the months and years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

Justice Dept. Opens Civil Rights Unit In Alabama

Aug 21, 2012
www.justice.gov / Wikimedia Commons

The Justice Department is establishing a civil rights unit in Alabama after the state's crackdown on illegal immigration raised broader concerns about compliance with federal laws. Assistant U.S. Attorney Tom Perez said Tuesday fewer than 10 such units are located around the country. The nearest is in Memphis, Tennessee. Perez said the move is meant to ensure that the federal government has a continuing eye on civil rights issues in Alabama, which was a hotbed of unrest during the civil rights movement 50 years ago. The U.S.

Florida Atlantic University

The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta has issued a ruling today on Alabama's immigration law or HB56. The Court has thrown out the provision that required schools to collect data on the immigration status of students who enroll in school. The Court has also temporarily blocked two sections of the law, Section 10 and Section 27. Section 10 is also known as the "papers please" section. It makes it a state crime if an immigrant is not carrying an alien registration document. Section 27 forbids citizens from entering into contracts with illegal immigrants.

Florida Atlantic University

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is holding a public hearing about crackdowns on illegal immigration in Alabama and other states. The panel will meet in Birmingham on Friday to hear from both supporters and opponents of the laws. Speakers include Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who's pushed for such measures nationwide, and Republican state Sen. Scott Beason of Gardendale, a sponsor of Alabama's law. Critics of the measures are on the agenda, but they're complaining that members of what they call hate groups are being allowed to participate.

longislandwins / Flickr

Beginning today, undocumented immigrants under the age of 31 can apply for so-called "Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals."

The program is designed to allow migrants to live and work in the U-S openly without fear of deportation.

State Homeland Security Director Spencer Collier says this will create a bureaucratic hurdle for Alabama law enforcement and businesses. Collier says since the policy change potentially could apply to anyone between 16 and 30 years of age, this new layer encompasses a substantial portion of the undocumented alien population.

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Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

The self-proclaimed "Toughest Sheriff in America" is facing one of his toughest tests. A trial begins Thursday morning in Phoenix accusing Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio of violating the civil rights of Latino citizens and legal U.S. residents. The class-action civil suit says the sheriff went over the line in his efforts to crack down on illegal immigration.

Some Alabama boards not following immigration law

Jun 28, 2012

Some state regulatory boards aren't abiding by a requirement in Alabama's new immigration law that they check the legal residency of people getting licenses to do business in the state.

The state Examiners of Public Accounts issued reports saying the Alabama Home Builders Licensure Board and the Alabama Manufactured Housing Commission have ``not taken action to comply with state law that requires its licensees to be either United States citizens or lawfully present in the United States.''