Governor George Wallace

 

    

When people ask me about the classic Alabama governor’s races, the first that comes to mind is the 1970 Titanic clash between Albert Brewer and George Wallace.

 

Albert Brewer was smart and articulate with a charming smile and winning personality. He had lots of friends in the legislature having been a speaker and Lt. Governor. All that gave him a good grasp of state politics.  He smoothly took the reigns of state government upon the death of Lurleen Wallace

 

 

The Alabama legislature met in special session on Monday to resolve the on-going debate over the general fund budget. Both chambers recessed the same day, with an eye on meeting again next month. One proposal is to merge the general fund with the spending plan for Alabama schools. Whether that ideas works or not is one issue. APR political commentator Steve Flowers says one trick state lawmakers have avoided in the past is a political case of “robbing Paul to pay Peter.”

State prosecutors say indicted House Speaker Mike Hubbard is once again manufacturing investigation leaks to distract the public from his criminal wrongdoing.

Yesterday, prosecutors asked a judge to reject Hubbard's motion to dismiss their indictment. Hubbard claimed there were violations of the grand jury secrecy act and other problems with the investigation against him.

State prosecutors said Hubbard's claims are baseless, and a “bogus narrative”.

wikipedia.org

An Illinois auction house says it is selling the revolver that almost killed former Gov. George Wallace.

Chris Pow / al.com

Members of Congress dabbed away tears while visiting the spot where former Gov. George Wallace made his "Stand in the Schoolhouse Door" against racial integration at the University of Alabama 50 years ago. Representatives and senators making a civil rights pilgrimage attended a campus commemoration on Friday.

They included Democratic Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, an Alabama native. He and others wiped away tears as Wallace's daughter, Peggy Wallace Kennedy, talked about her father never discussing the event with her before his death.

Ttownfeen / Wikimedia Commons

One of the first black students at the University of Alabama, James Hood of Gadsden, has died. He was 70.

Officials at Adams-Buggs Funeral Home in Gadsden said they are handling arrangements for Hood, who died Thursday. Details concerning Hood's funeral are not complete.

Hood's admission to the University of Alabama in 1963 was made famous by then Alabama Gov. George Wallace's "stand in the schoolhouse door" to keep Hood and Vivian Malone from registering for classes at the University of Alabama.