global warming

University of Alabama officials say a senior chemical engineering and chemistry student has been chosen to participate in a conference on climate change being hosted by the United Nations.

University officials said in a statement that Catherine King of Huntsville is one of eight students the American Chemical Society selected to attend the UN's conference in Lima, Peru. The event is expected to include representatives from more than 190 countries.

Jim Paris (

A new study finds that climate change is threatening more than half the bird species in the United States.  The National Audubon Society studied 588 bird species, including in Alabama. Of those, 314 could be forced to relocate as their habitats shift.  Scot Duncan is an Associate Professor of Biology at Birmingham-Southern College. 

Scot Duncan: “We’re looking at a tremendous loss of birds, and some species entirely, leaving our neighborhoods and the places that we like to spend time.”

Alabama's attorney general is scheduled to testify to a Senate subcommittee in Washington in opposition to environmental regulations affecting coal-fired power plants.

A spokesman for Attorney General Luther Strange says he was invited by Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to testify Wednesday at a meeting of the Senate Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Safety. The subcommittee is focusing on climate change. Sessions is a member of the subcommittee.

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The question of how to reduce the pollution that causes global warming is now a hot topic since new carbon limits were announced by the EPA earlier this month.  Those proposed rules aim to reduce national carbon emissions from existing power plants 30 percent by the year 2030.  In Alabama, the goal is 27 percent.  The boom in natural gas could help, as could investments in renewable energy like wind and solar.  Another method is what’s called “carbon capture.”  Dr.

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange says he may take legal action to challenge the Obama administration's latest ruling on power plant emissions.

Strange says restrictions on emissions will cost Alabama jobs and increase heating and cooling costs. reports that Strange says 16,000 coal-related jobs in Alabama could be affected.

coal in transport bins
Arnoldius / Wikimedia Commons

The Obama administration wants Alabama to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by about 27 percent over the next 16 years.

The Environmental Protection Agency on Monday announced targets for reducing carbon emissions in individual states. It's a major part of the administration's effort to combat climate change.

In Alabama, the government says power plants produced 1,444 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt hour in 2012. The government wants to reduce that amount by about 27 percent by 2030.