Doug Jones

Alabama's governor is distancing herself from President Donald Trump on the issue of trade, saying import tariffs like those supported by the Trump administration would hurt the state.

Gov. Kay Ivey released a statement yesterday saying import tariffs could cause retaliatory tariffs that would drive up the cost of items made in Alabama and sold abroad.

The administration already has imposed new tariffs on $50 billion worth of Chinese imports, plus steel and aluminum from China, the European Union, Canada and Mexico.

Roy Moore has filed a new lawsuit against some of the women who accused him of sexual misconduct shortly before last year’s special election for U.S. Senate.

Moore claims the women were part of a “political conspiracy” to derail his bid for Senate. His campaign was dogged by accusations from multiple women that Moore had pursued sexual or romantic relationships with them when they were teenagers and he was a prosecutor in his 30s.

Failed U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore is countersuing a woman who says he molested her when she was 14 and he was 32.

Moore's attorneys filed the defamation counterclaim on Monday against Leigh Corfman — who has an ongoing defamation lawsuit against Moore — denying Corfman's accusations of sexual misconduct first raised in an interview with the Washington Post. Corfman is among several women who say Moore romantically or sexually pursued them decades ago when they were in their teens and he was in his 30s.

Alabama U.S. Senator Doug Jones, the Democrat who unexpectedly prevailed in one of the country's most Republican states, has a book set to come out next year.

St. Martin's Press told The Associated Press that Jones' "Bending Toward Justice: The Birmingham Church Bombing that Changed the Course of Civil Rights" is scheduled for release in January.

Newly elected U.S. Senator Doug Jones of Alabama addressed Mississippi Democrats at their annual dinner in Brandon.  

The dinner had traditionally been called the Jefferson-Jackson-Hamer dinner, but Democrats are now calling it the Hamer-Winter dinner, named for civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer and former Democratic Gov. William Winter.

Alabama State House
Jay Williams / Flickr

In the wake of the first Democratic U.S. Senate victory in Alabama in a quarter-century, state lawmakers are working to get rid of special elections for Senate.

House members voted 67 to 31 yesterday in favor of a bill that would change how Senate vacancies are filled in Alabama. Instead of a special election, the governor would appoint an interim senator who would serve until the next statewide general election – up to two years.

al.com

Doug Jones was certified as the winner of the December 12th special election to fill Alabama's open U.S. Senate seat. Election officials say Jones won with just under twenty-two thousand votes. Defeated U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore reacted to Alabama finalizing the election results by again saying experts agree the election was "fraudulent."  

He made the comment in a brief statement Thursday afternoon, shortly after a state board officially declared Democrat Doug Jones the winner of the Dec. 12 election.

Roy Moore has filed a lawsuit to try to stop Alabama officials from certifying Democrat Doug Jones as the winner of the U.S. Senate race.

The court filing occurred just ahead of today's meeting of a state canvassing board to officially declare Jones the winner of the Dec. 12 special election. Jones defeated Moore by about 20,000 votes.

Moore's attorney wrote that he believes there were irregularities during the election and says there should be a fraud investigation and eventually a new election.

Doug Jones won last night's special election for U.S. Senate, defeating Roy Moore by 1.5% of the vote in last night’s election. Moore’s camp, though, is looking for a possible recount.

Moore refused to concede the election last night, and told his supporters “When the vote is this close, it’s not over. We still have to go by the rules, by this recount provision.”

With ~92% of precincts reporting, multiple media outlets report Democrat Doug Jones has won Alabama's special election for U.S. Senate.

Statewide, UNOFFICIAL election results are as follows:

Doug Jones: 589,531 (49.6%)

Roy Moore: 581,225 (48.9%)

Write-ins (total): 18,727 (1.6%)

Pensacola rally snow
Alex AuBuchon / APR

President Donald Trump held a campaign-style rally in Pensacola as part of a weekend trip across the Gulf Coast – less than 20 miles from the Alabama state line and just four days before the hotly contested Senate election between Doug Jones and Roy Moore. Some political experts believed the event would be a de facto campaign stop for Roy Moore. Others said Trump was there to thank the Pensacola area for their strong support during last year’s election. Turns out, it was a little of both.

Senator Richard Shelby says he decided to cast a write-in ballot in the state's upcoming Senate election because of allegations that GOP 

   nominee Roy Moore molested a girl when she was 14.

Shelby told CNN in an interview Sunday that the accusation was the "tipping point" in his decision not to vote for Moore. He says he wrote in the name of a "distinguished" Republican instead.

Shelby previously announced his refusal to vote for Moore, but he explained it during the interview.

A former Marine who has launched a write-in campaign for the U.S. Senate seat in Alabama says he believes residents are not being properly represented by the two other candidates.

Ret. Col. Lee Busby appeared on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" this morning. He says winning is "doable" even though the election is only two weeks away. Busby is a former aide to John Kelly who is now President Donald Trump's chief of staff. He is running as an independent candidate against Democrat Doug Jones and Republican Roy Moore.

Alabama voters have until 11:59 p.m. this evening to register to vote in order to participate in the Dec. 12 special election for the U.S. Senate between Democratic nominee Doug Jones and Republican nominee Roy Moore.

Under state law, the last day to register is the 15th day before an election, which is today. Voters can register during normal office hours at county board of registrars' offices and other designated locations in each county. Or voters can register online until 11:59 p.m. tonight.

Roy Moore
NBC News

President Donald Trump is again coming to the side of embattled Republican Roy Moore by bashing the Democratic nominee in a hotly contested Alabama U.S. Senate race.

Trump tweets "the last thing we need" in Alabama and the Senate is a "puppet" of the Democratic congressional leadership. Trump contends Democrat Doug Jones — a former prosecutor — is "WEAK" on crime and border security, and "BAD" for the military, veterans, and gun rights. Trump claims Jones is itching to raise taxes "TO THE SKY" and would be "a disaster."

The Alabama Republican Party says it stands with GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore, breaking ranks with national Republicans who have called for him to step out of the race amid sexual misconduct allegations. 

Republican Party Chairwoman Terry Lathan said Thursday that the party's 21-member steering committee "supports Judge Roy Moore as our nominee."

 

Doug Jones' campaign issued a Monday statement about the accusations of sexual misconduct being made against Moore. Jones' campaign is applauding what it calls "the courage" of Moore's accusers. And it says Moore will be held accountable "by the people of Alabama for his actions."

Democratic U.S. Senate Candidate Doug Jones has seen a major bump in fundraising efforts, according to campaign officials.

According to the Alabama Political Reporter, over the first three months of the campaign through July 31, Jones only raised $300,000. Now the campaign says Jones has about $1.3 million, a million of which is cash on hand as of the end of the third quarter. Those numbers have not been independently verified, as the third-quarter Federal Election Commission fundraising reports were due on Sunday but have not yet been made public.

1 Dexter Avenue
Chris Pruitt / Wikimedia

U.S. Senate candidate and former Alabama chief justice Roy Moore is facing additional scrutiny over personal compensation from the legal charity he founded.

Property records show the Foundation for Moral Law gave Moore a nearly $400,000 promissory note and mortgage on the group’s historic building in downtown Montgomery. The board of the foundation says the arrangement was to make up for unpaid salary promised to Moore as the organization’s president. That financial stake in the building was later boosted twice and now sits at $540,000.

Tomorrow is the Republican runoff election between sitting U.S. Senator Luther Strange and former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, and the White House is suggesting it won’t really be that big a defeat if their candidate loses.

Strange Hoping for Boost as Runoff Election Nears

Sep 8, 2017

As the Alabama Senate race heads into its final stretch, incumbent Luther Strange may need a lot of help from Washington to have a chance. Three polls show the senator trailing former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore by double digits. Two more show Strange behind, but within the margin of error. 

Sitting Alabama Senator Luther Strange will be facing off with former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore in a runoff for the Republican nomination for Senate.

Moore forced Strange into a runoff in yesterday’s primary election, even though the former Alabama Attorney General was backed by an endorsement from President Donald Trump and millions of campaign dollars from establishment Republicans.

Alabama candidates in the race for Attorney General Jeff Sessions' former U.S. Senate seat spent the weekend in a flurry of last-minute campaign stops ahead of Tuesday's primary.  

Republican Senator Luther Strange, who currently holds the seat, said Saturday that President Donald Trump's endorsement was "critical" in the campaign's homestretch.

Strange faces a slate of Republican challengers, including former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, U.S. Representative Mo Brooks, state Senator Trip Pittman and Christian Coalition leader Randy Brinson.

The deadline to register to vote is nearing in Alabama's U.S. Senate primary.

Voters have through July 31 to register to vote in the Aug. 15 primary. 

  Crowded fields of Republicans and Democrats are vying to replace Attorney General Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate.

A primary runoff, if needed, will be held on Sept. 26. The general election will be held Dec. 12.

Mo Brooks
Getty

The race to fill Alabama’s second U.S. Senate seat is heating up, and a recent informal poll could spell bad news for the incumbent.

Nine candidates, both Republican and Democrat, vying for Jeff Sessions’ former Senate seat participated in a candidate forum and straw poll last night in Huntsville. Al.com reports the event was organized by the Christian Citizen Task Force, with over 300 people in attendance.