campaign finance / Office of the Governor

Gov. Robert Bentley has surpassed the $6 million fundraising mark in his quest to win a second term in office.

Bentley has raised $6.1 million over the last two years, according to fundraising reports filed Thursday.

Republican Bentley maintains a lopsided fundraising advantage over Democrat Parker Griffith a month ahead of the November election.

Griffith has raised $347,000 in cash donations since announcing his bid for governor.

The former congressman has also loaned his campaign $391,000.

Gov. Robert Bentley has already raised more for his re-election campaign than he spent to win the Republican nomination for governor in 2010.

Bentley's campaign filed a campaign finance report showing he raised more than $746,000 in December. That brought his total fundraising to $3.3 million.

Bentley reported spending $2.6 million to win the Republican nomination in 2010. His entire campaign in 2010 cost $8.1 million.


Statewide elections are still more than a year away, but candidates are busy raising money.

The Anniston Star reported Sunday that state finance records show more than $11 million has been raised since June — when candidates first became eligible to receive contributions for their 2014 campaigns.

The newspaper says Republican candidates have picked up $6.8 million of that cash, while Democrats garnered only $861,000. Political action committees pulled in $6.3 million over the same time period.

Republican House Speaker Mike Hubbard recently transferred nearly $18,000 from his campaign fund to the state treasury.

Hubbard said he made the transfer of $17,797 because the campaign rules are not clear and he wanted to be extra careful.

A key House Republican says lawmakers have more work to do before settling on final changes to Alabama campaign finance laws.

But Rep. Mike Ball of Madison says he doesn't want to give in on House GOP proposals concerning political contributions by corporations and utilities, including the influential Alabama Power Co. / Wikimedia Commons

The Supreme Court will hear a challenge to campaign finance laws limiting how much an individual can give to political campaigns.

The justices on Tuesday decided to hear an appeal from Shaun McCutcheon of Alabama and the Republican National Committee. They are arguing that it's unconstitutional to stop a donor from giving more than $46,200 to political candidates and $70,800 to political committees and PACs.

McCutcheon says he accepts that he can only give $2,500 to a single candidate but says he should be able to give that amount to as many GOP candidates as he wants.

Republican and Democratic strategists tell NPR that most of the estimated $4 billion to be spent by the campaigns, political action committees and others on the 2012 presidential race will make no difference in the outcome.