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Americans' trust of the federal government is the lowest it's been in 40 years. This presidential election has made that clearer than ever.

In Detroit, some residents so distrust their elected officials they're trying to take some power back with a ballot measure next week.

Emma Lockridge lives next-door to an 8-lane highway and one of the largest industrial operations in Michigan, the Marathon Oil Refinery in Detroit.

Samsung is offering repairs, refunds and replacements for about 2.8 million top-load washers after receiving hundreds of reports of machines vibrating excessively — in some cases, so much that the lids became detached.

The consumer electronics company, still reeling from a total recall and halt of its Galaxy Note 7 phone, is recalling 34 models of its top-load washing machines, manufactured as far back as March 2011. (Front-load washers are not affected by the recall.)

The Justice Department is investigating the pricing practices of several generic drug manufacturers because the list prices of many older medications have risen in lockstep in recent years.

That investigation could lead to an antitrust lawsuit alleging price-fixing by the end of this year, according to a report by Bloomberg News. Bloomberg cited anonymous sources familiar with the probe.

A federal jury has found that Rolling Stone, a reporter and the magazine's publisher are liable in a defamation lawsuit over a retracted article about an alleged rape at the University of Virginia.

The trial centered on a November 2014 piece by reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely that told the story of a student, identified as "Jackie," who said she was brutally gang raped at a fraternity party in 2012.

A few years ago, the Urban Institute undertook a massive experiment to measure discrimination in home rentals and sales. The researchers sent hundreds of people in dozens of cities across the country to act as applicants trying to rent or buy apartments and houses. The "testers" were given similar credit histories and financial qualifications.

Go ahead — ask the boss for a raise.

The jobs report released Friday by the Labor Department suggests the time finally may be right to demand a fatter paycheck.

The October report showed employers added 161,000 jobs — and paid workers more. Average hourly earnings rose by 10 cents to $25.92 last month — and that gain followed September's increase of 8 cents an hour.

One of China's wealthiest men has been on a buying spree in Hollywood, snapping up cinemas and movie production companies. Now Wang Jianlin, the chairman of the Beijing-based Dalian Wanda Group has acquired another piece of Americana: Dick Clark Productions.

The U.S. added 161,000 new jobs in October, with workers seeing strong growth in wages, according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Hourly earnings rose 10 cents over last month, a higher increase than anticipated. In total, wages — now averaging $25.92 an hour — are up 2.8 percent year over year.

San Francisco Bay Area companies say Sutter Health is strong-arming them into a contract that would help the hospital system secure its power over prices and potentially raise the cost of medical care for their employees in the future.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now here's one of the final bits of economic news we may get before the Presidential Election Day. The economy continued adding jobs at a solid pace in October. That's according to government numbers released this morning. NPR's John Ydstie has more.

When electric cars began to take hold in the U.S. market — a small hold — the big concern was range anxiety: the fear that your vehicle doesn't have the fuel to get to your destination.

One of Donald Trump's most ardent supporters in Silicon Valley allegedly told two of his classmates at Stanford that he thought South Africa's former apartheid system of government was "a sound economic system." On Thursday, through a spokesperson, Thiel denied ever having supported apartheid.

When news broke Friday that the FBI had discovered emails that might be pertinent to its investigation of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, stock prices suddenly took a tumble.

The decline can be explained by an unusual development in this year's long, contentious presidential campaign, says Eric Zitzewitz, a professor of economics at Dartmouth College.

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The value of Egypt's beleaguered currency fell by almost 50 percent against the dollar Thursday. That's after the country's central bank decided to lift controls and let the pound freely float.

The move in the region's most populous country was designed to take aim at the black market and is likely to cause prices to jump.

There's a seductive idea, currently being road-tested, for how to stop the world's forests from disappearing. It relies on big food companies.

That's because most forests are being cleared in order to grow crops or graze cattle. And the resulting palm oil, soybeans or beef find their way into foods being sold by a relatively small number of global companies.

So here's the strategy: Get those companies to boycott products from deforested land, and much of the economic incentive to clear more forests will disappear. This should slow down or even stop the loss of forests.

As customers this week begin shopping for 2017 health insurance on HealthCare.gov and state exchanges, which is a better buy, overall: a bronze plan, or silver? And will the IRS go after taxpayers next year who don't repay the subsidies they got — but didn't ultimately qualify for — in 2016? Here are the answers to some recent questions from readers.

A British court has ruled that the U.K. government must get approval from Parliament in order to initiate the country's departure from the European Union.

The High Court's decision is a blow to the government's plans for how to trigger a "Brexit."

On a bright, blustery October morning in Clarkston, Ga., the sweet aroma of baked treats and brewing coffee flows out the windows of the fire engine-red food truck known as Refuge Coffee Co. parked at a street corner. A dozen or so eager customers mill about, converse and gradually fall into line.

Police used pepper spray and what they called nonlethal ammunition to remove Dakota Access Pipeline protesters from federal land Wednesday. Demonstrators say they were trying to occupy land just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation where construction of the controversial pipeline is scheduled.

Note: This episode originally aired in October 2012. Listen to part one of this series here.

Luxury department store Neiman Marcus is well-known for its opulent holiday offerings.

For example, its "Christmas Book" holiday gift guide is offering his-and-hers "Island cars" for $65,000 each. And a trip to castles in the U.K. for eight will set you back a cool $700,000.

Gawker Media and former professional wrestler Hulk Hogan have reached a settlement after years of litigation in an invasion of privacy lawsuit.

"The saga is over," Gawker founder Nick Denton wrote in a blog post.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Federal Reserve's policymakers ended their two-day meeting Wednesday without raising interest rates.

But they did issue a statement saying the case for more expensive loans is strengthening. That's because the U.S. economy is improving enough to allow interest rates to rise soon to more normal levels.

In recent weeks, "the labor market has continued to strengthen and growth of economic activity has picked up from the modest pace seen in the first half of this year," the Fed said.

President Obama said Tuesday that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is examining possible alternate routes for the Dakota Access Pipeline.

When it comes to health care, the choice between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump comes down to whether to keep, or trash, the Affordable Care Act.

Trump says he wants to repeal and replace the health care law that is responsible for insuring about 20 million people, while Clinton has vowed to retain it and even expand its reach.

Here are the candidates' plans:


HILLARY CLINTON

  • Keep and build on Obamacare
  • Offer a tax credit of up to $5,000 to offset out-of-pocket costs over 5 percent of income

Deals, deals and more deals — corporations are on a merger binge. But are they helping or hurting the economy?

In the short run, mergers can hurt workers, consumers and savers. But most economists say that in the long run, consolidation can increase efficiency and strengthen U.S. corporations, helping the economy for all. Let's walk through recent events, and consider the arguments.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

One family has owned and operated The New York Times since 1896. And this week, the fifth generation takes on a leadership role. A.G. Sulzberger, the new deputy publisher, remembers his father showing him the printing press when he was 5.

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