Business & Education

The Salt
11:14 am
Wed June 24, 2015

Survival Of The Greenest Beer? Breweries Adapt To A Changing Climate

The Smuttynose Towle Farm brewery in Hampton, N.H., has an invisible but tight envelope that keeps the interior temperature consistently cool or warm, prevents energy loss and ultimately saves money.
Courtesy of Smuttynose Brewing Company

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 3:05 pm

When you hear the words "green brewery," you might picture gleaming solar panels or aerodynamic wind turbines. But the most valuable piece of technology at the $24 millionheadquarters of Smuttynose Brewing Co. on the seacoast of New Hampshire isn't quite as sexy.

"The place you have to start is the building envelope," says Smuttynose founder Peter Egelston.

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The Salt
11:09 am
Wed June 24, 2015

Genetically Modified Salmon: Coming To A River Near You?

AquaBounty's salmon (background) has been genetically modified to grow bigger and faster than a conventional Atlantic salmon of the same age (foreground.)
Courtesy of AquaBounty Technologies, Inc.

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 3:25 pm

While the debate over whether to label foods containing GMO ingredients plays out across the country, another engineered food has long been waiting to hit grocery stores: genetically modified salmon.

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Shots - Health News
10:19 am
Wed June 24, 2015

When Does Workplace Wellness Become Coercive?

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 11:37 am

Christine White pays $300 a year more for her health care because she refused to join her former employer's wellness program, which would have required that she fill out a health questionnaire and join activities like Weight Watchers.

"If I didn't have the money ... I'd have to" participate, says White, 63, a retired groundskeeper from a Portland, Ore., community college.

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Business
5:35 am
Wed June 24, 2015

Confederate Flag Merchandise Is Delicate Topic For Retailers

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 1:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Health Care
4:09 am
Wed June 24, 2015

Calif. Health Officials Aid People Facing Astronomic Drug Bills

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 12:54 pm

Copyright 2015 KQED Public Media. To see more, visit http://www.kqed.org.

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Every day for six months last year, Mikkel Lawrence stood over his bathroom sink in Northern California and took two pills that were very expensive.

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Around the Nation
4:09 am
Wed June 24, 2015

S.C. Retailers Caught In The Middle Of Renewed Debate Over Confederate Flag

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 9:06 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
5:33 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

What's Trending On Instagram? A Battle With Twitter

Instagram's latest update features curated photo collections and trending tags.
Instagram

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 6:35 pm

Consider yourself warned: Instagram rolled out an update Tuesday, and the photo-sharing app may be about to eat up a lot more of your time.

More substantial than other recent makeovers touting new filters, this change will transform Instagram into a stream of real-time updates from around the country. Following in the footsteps of Twitter and Facebook, Instagram wants to be a source for your news.

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The Salt
5:18 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

As Tastes Shift, Food Giant General Mills Gets A Makeover

Product developer Erin Schutt was part of a team that came up with a new line of frozen vegetables for General Mills' Green Giant brand.
Jim Zarroli NPR

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 1:54 pm

It's not just the Lucky Charms that are getting a makeover at General Mills. The company's announcement Monday that it is removing artificial colors and flavors from its cereal line is part of a much bigger overhaul at the food giant.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Senate Votes To Advance The White House Trade Agenda

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 3:58 pm

The Senate voted 60-37 Tuesday to advance President Obama's trade agenda — setting up a big victory for the White House and a painful loss for labor unions.

This latest Senate vote clears away procedural hurdles for legislation granting Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) to Obama. That power allows the president to negotiate trade pacts and then put them on a so-called fast track through Congress. With TPA in place, Congress would take a simple yes-or-no vote on any trade deal, with no room for amendments.

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Business
10:36 am
Tue June 23, 2015

Airlines Vs. Airports: A Dogfight Over Fees Imposed On Fliers

A plane takes off from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport on May 25. Airports want Congress to raise passenger fees to pay for improvements.
Trevor Collens AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 1:35 pm

You'd think everyone in the aviation industry would be on the same page about improving air travel. Surely they all want more modern aircraft and upgraded airports, right?

They do. But airlines and airports are in a political dogfight this summer over who should be getting more of your money for improvements.

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NPR Story
4:02 am
Tue June 23, 2015

Musicians Deny Requests To Allow Their Music To Be Streamed

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 7:10 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
4:02 am
Tue June 23, 2015

Anti-Austerity Greek Government Yields Ground At EU Summit

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 1:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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U.S.
4:02 am
Tue June 23, 2015

How Fracking Is Fueling A Power Shift From Coal To Gas

Bill Pentak of Panda Power Funds (left), Plant Manager John Martin (center) and Construction Manager Rob Risher (right) stand in front of the construction site for the new Panda Liberty gas power plant in Towanda, Penn. The plant, expected to come online in early 2016, was deliberately sited on top of the Marcellus Shale to take advantage of the cheap, abundant gas.
Marie Cusick WITF

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 7:10 am

When you flip on a light switch, odds are, you're burning coal. But as the fracking boom continues to unleash huge quantities of natural gas, the nation's electric grid is changing. Power plants are increasingly turning to this low-cost, cleaner-burning fossil fuel.

Bill Pentak stands in the middle of a construction site, looking up at his company's latest project towering overhead — a new natural gas power plant.

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The Two-Way
7:13 pm
Mon June 22, 2015

In The Battle Between Taylor Swift And Apple, Swift Didn't Fight Alone

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 12:51 pm

Taylor Swift is no stranger to positive, even fawning, press coverage. Just this month, there was the story about teenagers using light-up bracelets from a Swift concert to flag down help when they were trapped inside their car after a crash. The headline from MTV read "Taylor Swift Saved Three Teens' Lives — Literally."

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The Salt
6:19 pm
Mon June 22, 2015

Local Food Is Still A Niche. Can It Grow Beyond That?

Elk Grove, Calif., is a suburb of Sacramento, about 15 miles from the city center. This 14-square mile view of the city was photographed on Apr. 23, 2015.
Courtesy of Planet Labs

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 9:40 am

Local food enthusiasts have been trying to make the case that buying food from farmers nearby supports local economies, boosts food security and is better for the environment.

But so far, "local" food still makes up a pretty small fraction of what Americans eat. And given that most agriculture in the U.S. is geared toward producing food crops — from corn to soybeans to almonds — for the global market, it doesn't seem likely that will change.

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