Business & Education

The Two-Way
10:47 am
Thu March 19, 2015

NPR Appoints The AP's Michael Oreskes As News Chief

Michael Oreskes says that he admires NPR's reportorial muscle and that the network's greatest strength can be found in its ability to tell stories that listeners find compelling, accessible and absorbing.
Chuck Zoeller AP

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 1:57 pm

NPR has named Michael Oreskes, a top Associated Press executive and former New York Times editor who has led newsrooms in such global centers as New York, Washington and Paris, to run its news division.

Officially, Oreskes will be the network's senior vice president for news and editorial director, a slightly refashioned title. Oreskes is currently vice president and senior managing editor at the AP, where he oversees the giant international news wire's daily report.

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The Salt
10:33 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Cramped Chicken Cages Are Going Away. What Comes Next?

Free-range houses allow chickens to move around freely, but operating costs were 23 percent higher than for traditional cages, according to a new study.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 2:57 pm

For the past two years, at an undisclosed location in the Upper Midwest, a large commercial egg farm has been probed with every tool of modern science. Researchers have collected data on feed consumed, eggs produced, rates of chicken death and injury, levels of dust in the air, microbial contamination and dollars spent. Graduate students have been assigned to watch hours of video of the hens in an effort to rate the animals' well-being.

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Business
4:02 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Blue Shield Of California Loses Its Tax-Exempt Status

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 5:03 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Technology
4:02 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Companies Worried About Hackers Turn To Cyber Insurance

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
2:33 am
Thu March 19, 2015

More Americans Opt For Risky Long-Term Car Loans

Nearly a third of new auto loans now last 74 months or longer, which alarms some analysts.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 6:05 pm

There comes a day in every car owner's life when she knows, it's time. For Carolyn Ballard of Atlanta, that was on a hot day last July, while driving her SUV with misfiring cylinders.

"I drove to the dealership with the car literally chugging along," she says. "I mean, in traffic on the interstate. I was just sweating, thinking I've just got to get to the dealership so I can get rid of this, before I put any more money into it."

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The Two-Way
8:39 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Microsoft Is Phasing Out Internet Explorer

The logo of Microsoft's Internet Explorer, the Web browser due to be phased out in the next version of Windows.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 8:41 am

Clippy will soon get a roommate in Microsoft heaven or hell, depending on your perspective. This week, Microsoft announced that it will phase out Internet Explorer, its much-maligned Web browser, beginning with Windows 10.

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All Tech Considered
5:07 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Premera Blue Cross Cyberattack Exposed Millions Of Customer Records

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 7:28 pm

Another big health insurance company has revealed it has been the target of a massive cyberattack.

Premera Blue Cross says hackers may have taken up to 11 million customer records. Those records include credit card numbers, Social Security numbers, even information about medical problems. This news is just coming out but Premera issued a statement saying it discovered the breach on Jan. 29. That's about the same date that Anthem, another Blue Cross company, told the FBI that it was breached.

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Business
5:07 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

More Storefront 'Roommates' Splitting Space, Customers

Toni Riffel, the coffee guy, and Sarah O'Brien, the pastry lover, didn't know each other before they came together to share this space in Atlanta's Grant Park neighborhood.
Tom Nguyen Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 5:08 pm

More businesses across the country are teaming up to share space and customers. And while the economic marriages of convenience can have real advantages, they also come with some some stresses.

Sarah O'Brien is the owner of the Little Tart Bakeshop in Atlanta and shares a space with Octane, a local coffee roaster. She describes the relationship like having a roommate.

"We have to split our bills, we have to split the cleaning duties. It's just like having a roommate, you know, without the chore chart," she says.

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Economy
5:07 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Federal Reserve Says Job Market Conditions Have Improved

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Race
3:45 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Starbucks Faces Criticism Over 'Race Together' Campaign

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

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The Salt
3:26 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Pain From The Grain: Corn Belt Towns Languish As Prices Drop

With corn production expected to remain high, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is predicting that prices will continue to fall well into next year.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:27 pm

On a recent snowy afternoon on a farm in central Illinois, Dan Byers parked his pickup at the end of a dirt road and looked over some of his fertile land. A few years ago, high grain prices earned farmers here about $400 per acre for their corn and soybean crops. This year, it's possible that every acre Byers farms will cost him $50.

"It just takes a certain amount of fixed money to put a crop in and raise it," says Byers. "At today's prices, not much of anything works right now until there's a rebound."

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The Salt
3:00 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

This Spanish Pig-Slaughtering Tradition Is Rooted In Sustainability

Pig farmer Armando Escaño stands with his Iberian pigs on his farm on western Spain's dehesa. Escaño raises pigs for jamón ibérico, Spain's most prized ham.
Lauren Frayer for NPR

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 7:51 pm

In Spain, an age-old way of surviving the winter is getting some new attention from foodies worldwide. It's called la matanza — literally, the killing of a pig. It's an ancient ritual in danger of dying out, amid an influx of commercial abattoirs and modern supermarkets. But Spain's matanza is now getting renewed interest from farm-to-table food enthusiasts.

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The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Fed Sends Clear Sign On Raising Rates, But Says Hike Unlikely In April

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, seen Feb. 25 on Capitol Hill.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 4:42 pm

Updated at 2:47 p.m. ET

The Federal Reserve moved a step closer toward ending its zero interest rate policy. In a statement released Wednesday afternoon, the Fed dropped a pledge to be "patient" before raising rates. But, the Fed's Open Market Committee said, it is unlikely to raise rates in April.

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Economy
4:14 am
Wed March 18, 2015

The Fed's Next Move Is A Delicate One

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Business
4:14 am
Wed March 18, 2015

A Nuclear Deal With Iran Could Increase Global Oil Glut

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 9:09 am

It's not just Benjamin Netanyahu and other world leaders who are scrutinizing the Iran negotiations. Oil traders are, too. That's because there's already an oil glut, and an Iran deal could lift sanctions and mean even more oil.

"Even the thought that Iranian oil could be unleashed on the global market is, you know, getting people to sell first and ask questions later," says Phil Flynn, a senior market analyst and oil trader at The Price Group in Chicago.

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