Business & Education

Business
4:42 am
Tue August 13, 2013

BlackBerry May Be Sold

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with BlackBerry weighing its option.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

GREENE: The Canadian telecom firm announced yesterday that it maybe looking for new owners. BlackBerry was valued at more than $80 billion back in 2008. Then the iPhone and Android came along and stole its dominance of the smartphone market. Now BlackBerry is worth only about $5.4 billion and its market share is plummeting.

Economy
4:42 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Communities Debate Whether Sharing Services Saves Money

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

We're going to take a look this morning at how the economic downturn has hurt the places where we live - cities, counties, towns - and the ways that people are trying fight through.

MONTAGNE: We begin in Wisconsin, where, as in much of the country, municipalities are running out of sources of cash. Residents complain taxes are too high, then wince when services are cut.

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Business
4:42 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Why Modern Latinas Are A Challenge To Marketers

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Hispanic American are an increasingly important consumer demographic to woo. That's according to a new study from the market research firm Nielsen. The report says that most of today's Latinas are the primary decision makers when it comes to household spending.

But marketing to them is a real challenge, as NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji reports.

SHEREEN MARISOL MERAJI, BYLINE: Welcome to the home of the contemporary Latina consumer.

PAMELA MARIA WRIGHT: Hi.

MERAJI: Hi. How are you?

Good. How are you?

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Shots - Health News
3:07 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Obamacare: People With Disabilities Face Complex Choices

Speech-language pathologists Jill Tullman (left) and Mendi Carroll (right) work with Bryce Vernon at Talking with Technology Camp in Empire, Colo., on July 25.
Kristen Kidd KCFR News

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

The Affordable Care Act has set new standards — called essential health benefits — outlining what health insurance companies must now cover. But there's a catch: Insurance firms can still pick and choose, to some degree, which specific therapies they'll cover within some categories of benefit.

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Parallels
2:01 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Windsor, Ontario, To Detroit: 'Reset And Come Out Stronger'

The Detroit skyline seen from Windsor, Ontario. The two cities are connected by more than just a bridge.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

The Detroit River is the mile-wide boundary that separates the United States and Canada. And the city park on the Windsor, Ontario, side of the river offers a better view of the Detroit skyline than anywhere else.

In a quirk of geography, Detroit actually sits north of its Canadian neighbor. Natives like Stephen Santarossa, who's from Windsor, love this bit of trivia and relish the puzzled look on visitors' faces as they try to draw that mental map.

"Do you realize that you are now looking north?" he says.

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Shots - Health News
2:00 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Patients Can Pay A High Price For ER Convenience

In case of emergency, go to the strip mall or the hospital?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

Medical entrepreneurs are remaking the emergency room experience. They're pulling the emergency room out of the hospital and planting it in the strip mall.

It's called a "free-standing ER," and some 400 of them have opened across the country in the past four years.

The trend is hot around Houston, where there are already 41 free-standing ERs and 10 more in the works.

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The Two-Way
6:09 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Judge Throws Out Discrimination Claims Against Paula Deen

Will Paula Deen's admission of using a racial slur crumble her empire?
Courtesy of Food Network AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:24 pm

A federal judge in Georgia threw out the discrimination claims against Paula Deen on Monday in a lawsuit that sparked widespread criticism, led sponsors to jump ship and the Food Network to drop her show.

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The Two-Way
11:49 am
Mon August 12, 2013

London Puts Stop To Sidewalk Bins That Track Cellphones

A promotional image from Renew shows one of its recycling/advertising kiosks in London. City officials asked the company to stop recording data about the phones of passing pedestrians.
Renew

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:37 pm

The city of London has ordered a company to cease tracking the cellphones of pedestrians who pass its recycling bins, which also double as kiosks showing video advertisements. The bins logged data about any Wi-Fi-enabled device that passed within range.

The company, called Renew, recently added the tracking technology to about a dozen of the 100 bins it had installed before London hosted the 2012 Summer Olympics.

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The Two-Way
6:09 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Book News: Does Lance Armstrong Have The Right To Lie In His Memoirs?

Lance Armstrong is being sued for false claims in his books, which were marketed as nonfiction.
Nathalie Magniez Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:47 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Economy
4:48 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Sequestration Has Georgia Town On Edge

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:53 am

Warner Robins, Ga., is a booming community that is entirely dependent on civilian Defense Department employment. The local Air Force Base is massive, but because it's mostly a logistics depot, the bulk of the employees are not service members.

Business
4:13 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Premium Parking Space Comes With Big Price Tag

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Premium Parking.

A parking spot in London is on the market for $465,000. That buys an outdoor location near Buckingham Palace and a 91-year lease.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The price tag is more than two spots sold in Boston this summer off and go for $280,000 apiece. But with London's daily parking go fees running at $60, it's actually a deal actually - at only $14 a day.

MONTAGNE: If you park there for 91 years.

GREENE: If. That's a big if.

Business
4:13 am
Mon August 12, 2013

U.S. Postal Service Reports Quarterly Losses

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:53 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with more postal problems.

The United States Postal Service posted three quarters of a billion dollars in losses last quarter, making it nearly $4 billion so far this year. These losses come despite major trims to the operating budget in 2013. One immediate impact, it looks unlikely that Postal Service will be able to make a multibillion-dollar payment to a retiree benefits fund at the end of September. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Salt
2:09 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Food Delivery Hits The Web, But Restaurants Pay The Price

A Seamless sticker is displayed next to the menu in the window of a restaurant in New York's Times Square on Saturday. Rivals Seamless and GrubHub said Friday that they have completed their combination, creating an online takeout company covering about 25,000 restaurants in 500 cities.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:56 am

Two big restaurant delivery websites — Grubhub and Seamless — have announced a merger. Together, they'll allow diners in 500 cities the convenience of ordering from thousands of restaurants with just a few clicks on their computer. For restaurants, the costs of being on these websites can be hard to swallow.

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Parallels
2:08 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Too Much, Too Fast: China Sees Backlash From Massive Growth

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 10:25 am

At a time when much of the world is mired in economic torpor, China still enjoys enviable growth rates. Yet there's no question that its economy is growing more slowly these days.

Just ask Yan Liwei, a salesman for a construction materials company, who was visiting a park in Shanghai this weekend.

"The number of new construction projects is declining somewhat. It's taking longer for many of our clients to pay us what they owe," Liwei says. "Many small and midsized developers are feeling a cash crunch."

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The Salt
3:55 am
Sun August 11, 2013

America, Are You Tough Enough To Drink Real Russian Kvas?

A man drinks fresh kvas, the ancient Russian fermented-bread drink, in Zvenigorod, 35 miles west of Moscow.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:09 pm

While American kids stand in line for the ice cream truck on sweltering summer days, kids in Russia have historically queued up for something different: the kvas truck.

Kvas is a fermented grain drink, sort of like a barely alcoholic beer. And in the heat of the summer, it was served from a big barrel on wheels, with everyone lining up for their turn at the communal mug. It may sound like a far cry from rocket pops and ice cream sandwiches, but most Russians have fond memories.

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