Business & Education

Business
4:12 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Justice Department Approves American, U.S. Airlines Merger

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:56 pm

The Justice Department approved an airline merger Tuesday that will create the world's largest carrier. AMR, the parent of American Airlines, and U.S. Airways agreed to divest a number of slots and gates at key airports in order to enhance competition.

Energy
4:12 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Ethanol Is Center Stage In Fight Over American Fuel Tanks

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:56 pm

Two large industries — agriculture and oil — are fighting a pitched battle over access to your car's fuel tank. Americans are buying less gasoline, but a federal law requires the country to include an increasing amount of corn-based ethanol in the country's fuel supply. Facing billions of dollars in lost sales, the oil industry wants the government to reverse course on ethanol.

West Alabama-Auto Program
3:36 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Univ. Of West Ala. Starting Automotive Program

The University of West Alabama is getting some help as it starts a new automotive program.
Credit University of West Alabama

The University of West Alabama is getting some help as it starts a new automotive program.

The school at Livingston has received a grant of $100,500 from the Delta Regional Authority that will be used to buy equipment for a new automotive technician certification program.

The program is designed to train workers for part suppliers for Mercedes Benz. The companies are expanding operations following a $2.4 billion investment by the German automaker to add production lines at its plant near Tuscaloosa.

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Parallels
1:22 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Do For-Profit Schools Give Poor Kenyans A Real Choice?

Young students in a Bridge International Academy school in Nairobi, in September. On the surface, there's little to distinguish these schools from others in the developing world. But Bridge's model relies on teachers reading lessons from tablets.
Frederic Courbet for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 12:54 pm

Bridge International Academies has set up more than 200 schools in Kenya over the past four years, and plans to open 50 more in January.

Using a school-in-a-box model, Bridge's founders say it gives primary schoolkids a quality education for roughly $5 a month.

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The Two-Way
11:12 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Justice Reaches Deal To Allow American, US Airways Merger

A US Airways plane rests near two American Airlines jets at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport last year. The combined carrier would be named American Airlines.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 11:57 am

The Justice Department has reached a deal that will allow for the merger of American and US Airways, opening the door to the creation of the world's largest airline.

The merger still needs final approval from a bankruptcy court.

The U.S. had hoped to block the merger arguing that it would result in less competition and higher prices for consumers.

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The Salt
10:12 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Have Bitcoin To Burn? Next Stop Could Be The Farm

Economists say small-business owners — especially farmers dealing in high volume and low profit margins — are more likely to accept a volatile currency like Bitcoin than bigger businesses.
Allen Sheffield Flickr

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 1:54 pm

For food producers who sell directly to consumers, credit cards are both a blessing and a curse.

They're a way to do business with cashless customers, but 3 percent of every credit card sale is usually charged to the farmer as a transaction fee. That adds up in a high-volume, low-profit business like agriculture.

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The Two-Way
9:21 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Bailout Chief Tapped For Tougher Job: Regulating Derivatives

Meet the new boss? Timothy Massad, left, is to be nominated to replace Gary Gensler, right, as chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
Official portraits from the Treasury Dept. and CFTC

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 9:33 am

The news, as Bloomberg Businessweek writes, is that:

"Timothy Massad, the Treasury Department official responsible for overseeing the U.S. rescue of banks and automakers after the credit crisis, will be nominated to head the country's top derivatives regulator."

But leave it to The Wall Street Journal to neatly sum things up in a headline:

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Business
4:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Detroit Billionaire Goes On Real Estate Buying Binge

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:47 am

Despite the bankruptcy, parts of downtown Detroit are going gangbusters, and that's in large part because of one guy. Online mortgage mogul Dan Gilbert has bought up 40 buildings and counting. He's filling those buildings — some of which used to be vacant — with new businesses. But some residents are wary of his expanding reach in the city.

Business
4:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Millions Will Be Lost If Mexico Doesn't Go To World Cup

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Tomorrow in Mexico, the unthinkable may occur. The nation's beloved soccer team may fail to qualify for next year's World Cup in Brazil. OK, this may not be the grimmest news to come out of Mexico in recent years, but it will be a blow.

And it's a business story because as NPR's Carrie Kahn reports from Mexico City, the team's failure could cost broadcasters, sponsors and sports teams hundreds of millions of dollars.

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Business
4:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Apple And Samsung Resume Courtroom Battle

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:15 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with tech giants back in court.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: Apple and Samsung resumed their legal battles today. Last year, Samsung was found guilty of patent infringement. A judge ordered that Apple be paid a billion dollars in damages. Earlier this year, another judge reduced that amount to $450 million. Now a new trial, where a jury will reconsider both the allegations and the damages awarded. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
4:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

China Celebrates Singles Day By Buying Stuff

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: singles sales.

Yesterday, as Americans mark Veterans Day, China celebrated Singles Day. The holiday is a Chinese twist on Valentine's Day, a day to focus not on couples but on yourself.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And apparently the concept is good for business. It has led to an unprecedented online shopping spree. Internet sales in China yesterday beat out last year's U.S. Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales combined.

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NPR Story
4:01 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Affordable Care Act's Website Reflects Law's Complexity

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Its MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. We'll get a look this week at how many people have signed up for health insurance on the new government exchanges. According to the Wall Street Journal, fewer than 50,000 people have obtained coverage so far through the federal website. That's well below the government's original forecasts.

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Reporter's Notebook
2:04 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Dwindling Middle Class Has Repercussions For Small Towns

When reporter Kelly McEvers stepped off the train in Lincoln, Ill., she asked, "What happened to my hometown?"
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 1:23 pm

My parents moved away from Lincoln, Ill., two decades ago, when I was in college. I hardly ever get back there. But my mom still works in Lincoln, and it was to Lincoln I headed to meet her this fall, after returning to the U.S. from the Middle East.

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Parallels
1:58 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Will Colombia's Gamble On Medical Tourism Pay Off?

A billboard announces discounts on cosmetic treatments in a street of Cali, Valle del Cauca department, Colombia. In recent years the country has been building facilities specifically designed for medical tourists.
Luis Robayo AFP/Getty Images

International medical tourism is big business worldwide. Countries like India and Thailand lead the way as top destinations for people looking for high quality care at a fraction of the cost back home.

Lately, countries closer to the U.S. are also trying to break into the market — such as Colombia — which until recently was better known for drug trafficking than nose jobs.

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All Tech Considered
4:30 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Share And Share Alike: A Time Of Collaborative Consumption

Renting out your couches — or your entire place — is powered by San Francisco–based Airbnb, which has now connected more than half a million willing hosts and travelers in more than 34,000 cities.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 7:17 pm

This week on-air and online, the tech team is exploring the sharing economy. You'll find the stories on this blog, aggregated here and we would love to hear your questions about the topic. Just email, leave a comment or tweet.

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