Business & Education

Movies
4:03 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Can 'Fast & Furious' Survive Paul Walker's Death?

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 4:14 am

Since the tragic death of actor Paul Walker in a car crash, Universal Pictures has been struggling with how to handle its billion-dollar Fast & Furious franchise. Production on the seventh movie was underway when he died. David Greene talks to reporter Kim Masters, who has been following the story for The Hollywood Reporter. Masters also hosts The Business on member station KCRW.

Business
4:03 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Demand Grows For Trappist Monks' Beer

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 6:27 am

In Belgium, the Trappists produce Orval. Forbes Magazine reports there simply aren't enough monks to expand production of Orval. The abbey once had 35 monks, but today that number is down to just a dozen.

Business
4:03 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Fresh Merger Talks Involving Time Warner Expected To Begin

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 4:17 am

Charter Communications Inc. is expected to announce a new merger offer for Time Warner Cable Co. this week. It will be the company's third such offer. Industry analysts don't expect this one to work any better.

Business
4:03 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Amazon's Workers In Germany Strike Over Pay

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 6:11 am

About 1,000 unionized Amazon workers in Germany are going on strike in the midst of the crucial holiday season. They're asking to be paid on a similar scale to the mail order and retail sectors.

Parallels
1:49 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Battle Of The Bottom Feeder: U.S., Vietnam In Catfish Fight

Freshly caught catfish wriggle in large nets in Doddsville, Miss.
Jackie Northam NPR

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 12:17 pm

Bill Battle peers through the window of a pickup truck at his catfish farm, Pride of the Pond, near Tunica, Miss. The land is pancake-flat, broken up by massive ponds, some holding up to 100,000 pounds of catfish.

Cormorants fly low over the ponds, keeping an eye out for whiskered, smooth-skinned fish. Battle keeps a shotgun in the front seat; business is hard enough without the birds cutting into his profit.

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Europe
5:56 pm
Sun December 15, 2013

Ireland Exits Bailout Program, But Economy Still On The Mend

On Sunday, Ireland became the first country to formally exit the bailout program funded by the International Monetary Fund and the European Union.
Peter Muhly AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 7:24 am

Ireland was one of the countries hardest hit by Europe's debt crisis. On Sunday, it passed a big milestone when the nation became the first country to formally exit the bailout program funded by the International Monetary Fund and the European Union.

After three years of the bailout program, it isn't hard to find signs of improvement in Ireland and of an economy coming back from the dead.

"Don't get me wrong, it's been bad in a lot of ways, but there's a silver lining in every cloud," says Conor Mulhall, a 41-year-old father of three.

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The Salt
7:43 am
Sun December 15, 2013

Sriracha: First, The Crisis. Now, The Movie

Can't get enough of Sriracha? Now it can fill your belly and your screens.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 1:20 pm

Lately, it seems as if news about Sriracha has been as ubiquitous as the much-loved hot sauce itself.

First, there was the panic over a potential shortage, after a judge ordered the California factory where Sriracha is made to partially shut down, as our friends on the Two-Way blog have reported.

Now, this red hot culinary phenomenon is starring in its own documentary.

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Digital Life
4:32 pm
Sat December 14, 2013

Tug Of Authority Over Legal Gap In Online Privacy

iStockphoto

Even the most mundane online tasks require us to hand over sensitive data. Privacy policies pass by with an easy click. Yes, each company has its own legal language about the risks we take on, but the standards for consumer protection are murky.

"There is no one law in the United States that mandates that websites and phone applications have good data security," says law professor Woodrow Hartzog, who focuses on the area of privacy law and online communication.

So if there isn't one set of rules, who's working to keep your personal information safe?

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Business
4:13 pm
Sat December 14, 2013

A Woman Takes The Wheel At GM

For the first time, a woman has been named CEO of a major U.S. automotive company. Mary Barra, 51, breaks a glass ceiling in one of the most male-dominated industries in the nation. But women buy more than half the cars in America, so the question is why it took so long.

Around the Nation
3:20 pm
Sat December 14, 2013

Going The Distance: Mileage Running On Marathon Flights

David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 7:58 am

Travis MacRitchie is at his Los Angeles apartment packing a single carry on bag for a flight halfway across the world.

"I'm going off on a pretty ridiculous adventure, so fingers crossed that it'll go okay," he says.

He's headed to the Middle East on a flight to Bahrain and he'll be back home in just three days.

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All Tech Considered
5:56 pm
Fri December 13, 2013

A Movement To Bake Online Privacy Into Modern Life, 'By Design'

"The death of privacy has been predicted repeatedly over the years," says Ann Cavoukian, Ontario's privacy commissioner. "And my response to that is, 'Say no to that,' because, if you value your freedom, you will value your privacy."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 6:46 pm

As we become a more digitally connected society, one question has become increasingly pervasive: Is the expectation of privacy still reasonable?

Ann Cavoukian, the privacy commissioner for Ontario, Canada, thinks so. She contends that privacy — including privacy online — is foundational to a free society. She developed a framework for approaching privacy issues back in the 1990s that's been recognized around the world.

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Around the Nation
5:21 pm
Fri December 13, 2013

States Settle Into Wooing War With Bids For Boeing Plane Plant

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 5:56 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Negotiations between Boeing and the machinists union in Washington State broke down again last night. The union rejected Boeing's latest contract offer. The deal would've guaranteed that production of the new 777X airplanes would stay in the Seattle area. Now, the aerospace giant may be taking those planes and thousands of jobs elsewhere.

Other states are eagerly courting them. But Michael Tomsic of member station WFAE in Charlotte reports that landing the aerospace company won't come cheap.

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The Salt
4:31 pm
Fri December 13, 2013

Call the FBI! China Is Trying To Steal America's Seeds!

Seed corn sits in the hopper of a planter.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 6:54 pm

If you think grains of rice or kernels of corn are free gifts of nature, think again. Seed companies — and the FBI — take a very different attitude, and walking off with the wrong seeds can land you in very serious trouble indeed.

In two apparently unrelated cases this week, federal prosecutors arrested citizens of China and charged them with stealing seeds that American companies consider valuable intellectual property.

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Private School Tax Credits
3:57 pm
Fri December 13, 2013

Alabama Taxpayers Contributing To Get Tax Credits

Nearly 600 Alabama businesses and individuals are getting state tax credits by contributing to private school scholarship programs.
Credit kootation.com

Nearly 600 Alabama businesses and individuals are getting state tax credits by contributing to private school scholarship programs.

The tax credits were included in the Alabama Accountability Act that the Legislature passed in February. State Revenue Department spokeswoman Carla Snellgrove says that 582 donors have given $19.5 million to organizations set up under the new law to provide scholarships to students who move from failing public schools to participating private schools.

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Textbooks-Religion Complaints
3:50 pm
Fri December 13, 2013

Ala. Critics Say School Texts Insult Christians

Alabama's school board is postponing a decision on new school textbooks after conservatives complained they promote Islam and oppose Christianity.
Credit istockphoto

Alabama's school board is postponing a decision on new school textbooks after conservatives complained they promote Islam and oppose Christianity.

State School Superintendent Tommy Bice asked for the delay Thursday following complaints by the Eagle Forum of Alabama and ACT for America.

The groups complained that 12 textbooks proposed for social studies classes have a pro-Muslim slant and are anti-Christian.

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