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If you've consumed coconut oil or coconut meat lately, there's a reasonable chance it was imported from Thailand. And if it was, there's an even better chance the farmer who grew that coconut had a monkey fetch it from a tall tree.

The Wall Street Journal says federal investigators have turned up little to support the argument that Wal-Mart engaged in major bribery as it expanded in Mexico.

When energy booms go bust, the public is often left responsible for the cleanup. That's because while most states and the federal government make companies put up at least some money in advance to pay for any mess they leave behind, it's often not enough.

After the methane industry collapse, there were almost 4,000 wells in Wyoming that the company responsible walked away from. Now, the state has to pay the price.

In a blog post published Monday morning, Amazon is pushing back against an August story in The New York Times that portrayed it as a soul-crushing workplace where employees were forced to work long hours and encouraged to tear each other apart at meetings.

The Washington Post Managing Editor Kevin Merida is leaving his job at the end of the month and heading for ESPN, where he will become senior vice president and editor-in-chief of The Undefeated, a digital site that will explore the intersection of sports, race and culture.

The announcement was made Monday by The Washington Post Executive Editor Martin Baron in a memo sent to staff and later posted to the paper's website.

She liked it so much, she bought the company.

Oprah Winfrey will acquire a 10 percent stake in Weight Watchers International for $43.2 million and take a seat on its executive board, the company announced today. She will also receive options to buy an additional 5 percent stake.

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Americans collectively are losing billions of dollars a year out of their retirement accounts because they're paying excessive fees, according to researchers studying thousands of employer-sponsored retirement plans across the country.

The rearchers say part of the trouble is that many employers that offer 401(k) plans to their workers are outgunned by financial firms that sell them bad plans loaded with hefty fees. That's especially true, they say, for small and midsize employers that don't have much financial expertise in-house.

Kent Smetters is an economics professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. To educate people about how to save and invest more successfully he hosts a radio show, "Your Money," on Sirius XM which, along with his website, he does pro bono. As part of NPR's "Your Money and Your Life" series, we asked Smetters for tips on finding a financial adviser:

Finding a good adviser involves two key steps:

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How do some of the most respected investors on the planet think Americans should be investing their money? NPR talked to three about what a retirement portfolio should look like.

  • David Swensen has made an average return of 13.9 percent a year over the last 20 years for Yale, adding $20.6 billion to the university's endowment. That gives him the best track record of any institutional investor around. "Low costs and diversification serve investors well," he says.

The U.S. government is backing away from Arctic offshore oil and gas drilling on two fronts.

On Friday, the Department of the Interior announced the cancellation of two potential lease sales off the Alaskan coast in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement also denied lease extension requests from two companies, Shell and Statoil, that were exploring the seas for fossil fuels.

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Like all business owners, farmers want to get paid for their work. Sometimes, that work creates problems for the environment, so regulators are advancing the idea of creating environmental markets to allow farmers to make money off of their conservation practices.

Under plans in development, farmers could generate environmental credits by farming in ways that store carbon, filter out water pollution, or preserve wildlife habitat. Those credits could be bought, sold, and traded by companies that need to balance out their own emissions or pollution.

In a desk drawer, I have baggage tags from Eastern, TWA, Braniff, PanAm, Continental, Northwest and more.

As a journalist, I covered each of those airlines as they disappeared from the skies.

On Saturday, I can add one more to my defunct-carrier collection: US Airways will fade into history when its last flight, leaving from San Francisco on Friday night, lands in Philadelphia, scheduled for 6:18 a.m. ET.

A court ruling on Friday gave Google a new boost of confidence for its ambitious goal to digitize all the world's books. The ruling also gives us a new test of the idea of "fair use" of copyrighted content for the era, in which we increasingly expect to find everything online including the kitchen sink.

If you could start selling something in Cuba that would be a sure-fire money maker, what would it be?

Probably something that hasn't been widely available for more than 50 years in the state-controlled economy. A product for which there's pent up demand and one that would surely spruce up the place after decades of neglect.

Mexican businessman Jaime Murow Troice is already selling it: paint.

For a decade now, Google's enormous project to create a massive digital library of books has been embroiled in litigation with a group of writers who say it's costing them a lot of money in lost revenue. On Friday, Google notched a new victory when a federal appeals court ruled that the company's project was fair use.

A three-judge panel's vote was unanimous. Here's the summary opinion written by Judge Pierre Leval of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan, in the case of Authors Guild v. Google, Inc:

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Nevada regulators have ordered daily fantasy sports sites like FanDuel and DraftKings to shut down, saying the businesses can't operate in the state without a gambling license.

The sites, which claim they operate under a skill-based wagering model — not chance-based — and therefore should not be subject to gambling regulations, have soared in popularity over the last year, the Associated Press reports. But recently, increased scrutiny by regulators have dampened some of the excitement surrounding the sites.

Mark Noltner, who lives in suburban Chicago, heard about McTeacher's Nights when he found a flier in his daughter's backpack last year.

"There was a picture of Ronald McDonald [on the flier]," he says, and it was promoting the school fundraiser at a local McDonald's.

During McTeacher's Nights, teachers stand behind the counter at McDonald's, serving up food to their students who come in. At the end of the event, the school gets a cut of the night's sales.

The combustion engine is dominant. In the United States, according to the latest estimates from the Census, more than 76 percent of us get to work alone in a car. The numbers are not quite as lopsided in some big cities, where public transit and other options are more widely available.

Nowadays consumers are more willing to pay extra for a rack of ribs if it's produced nearby. A local bone-in ribeye, on average, costs about $1 more than a conventional steak. A pound of local sliced bacon has a $2 upcharge, according to retail reports from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

What are we paying for when we pay more for local meat? Lots of things. But small producers say one key issue that's holding them back, and driving up costs, is the strict rules when it comes to how they slaughter their animals.

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On Thursday, German authorities issued a mandatory recall of all Volkswagen diesel cars outfitted with emissions-cheating software.

Shortly after the German Federal Motor Transport Authority ordered the recall of 2.4 million diesel cars in Germany, Volkswagen announced it would be recalling 8.5 million cars across Europe.

The criticism Oscar-winning actress Jennifer Lawrence has lobbed at herself for not pushing for a higher fee to star in the film American Hustle is reverberating in Hollywood and beyond.