Business & Education

NPR Story
4:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Plunge In Circulation Forces Changes At Japanese Magazine

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 10:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Wonderful Wife.

It's the name of a women's magazine in Japan. It used to be a top seller back when more women stayed home and took care of their kids.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

But times have changed. As more women work even after having kids, Wonderful Wife has plunged in circulation. So the publisher says it's taking Wonderful Wife off the racks and replacing it with a new magazine aimed at working mothers.

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Law
4:51 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

When Being Pregnant Also Means Being Out Of A Job

While many women continue to work with little change in their duties while pregnant, others find that pregnancy can be a career liability.
Yuri Arcurs iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:06 pm

The workplace has become a more understanding place for pregnant women or new moms these days. Many companies now have lactation rooms and offer more liberal maternity and paternity leave policies than in years past.

But for some women, pregnancy can still be a career liability.

Heather Myers was fresh out of high school and working at a Wal-Mart in Salina, Kan., in 2006 when she found out she was pregnant. She kept a water bottle with her on the sales floor, as her doctor recommended. Then, her supervisor intervened.

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Media
3:23 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Who's Crazy Enough To Start A Newspaper In 2014? Ask LA Register

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:06 pm

The Los Angeles Register is a newspaper that just launched this week. Despite dropping newspaper sales, Ben Bergman of KPCC reports that the publisher thinks there's still an audience for print.

Shots - Health News
2:46 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Got A Hobby? Might Be A Smart Professional Move

Physicist Albert Einstein found great joy in his hobby — playing the violin.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 8:31 am

Maybe you paint, keep a journal or knit. Or maybe you play bass in a punk rock band.

Whatever hobby you have, keep at it. A little study published this week suggests that having a creative outlet outside the office might help people perform better at work.

Psychologists from San Francisco State University found that the more people engaged in their hobbies, the more likely they were to come up with creative solutions to problems on the job. And no matter what the hobby was, these people were also more likely to go out of their way to help co-workers.

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The Two-Way
2:14 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

BP Exec Who Led Cleanup Settles On Charges Of Insider Trading

BP Mobile Incident Commander Keith Seilhan talks with oil cleanup workers in Gulf Shores, Ala., in July 2010. Seilhan has settled with SEC regulators who say he avoided $100,000 in stock and options losses by trading on inside information related to the spill.
Dave Martin AP

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:59 pm

A former BP executive who led the company's cleanup of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill has agreed to pay $224,000 in penalties and restitution in a settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission for allegedly trading on inside information on the disaster.

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Planet Money
1:51 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

How Long Would You Have To Work To Buy A Burger In Your City?

istolethetv/Flickr

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 3:49 pm

How long does the average person have to work to buy a burger in his or her neighborhood? The maps below answer that question for neighborhoods in six cities around the country.

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All Tech Considered
1:27 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Can The Peer Economy Deliver Profits?

Postmates appeals to workers looking for a secondary income, CEO and co-founder Bastian Lehmann says.
Postmates.com

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 2:47 pm

Josh Gibbs normally wouldn't leave his apartment in Northeast Washington, D.C., pick up a loaded pizza from a restaurant in Chinatown, bike to a complete stranger's apartment, drop off the pizza and leave without any cash exchanging hands. But last week, he did just that. And truth be told, he kind of loved it.

"It's exciting. It's just fun," he says. "When the app goes off, when it beeps, I get this little adrenaline rush. I can make some money. It's like a game."

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Education
10:49 am
Thu April 17, 2014

You've Served Your Country, Now Get To Class

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This spring, we're joining our colleagues at NPR's Morning Edition to bring you stories that might help you navigate the higher education money maze. And today we want to talk about veterans.

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The Two-Way
7:38 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Weekly Jobless Claims Stay Near 7-Year Low

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 12:42 pm

There were 304,000 first-time claims filed for unemployment insurance last week, up just 2,000 from the previous week's revised figure of 302,000, the Employment and Training Administration said Thursday.

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Planet Money
6:41 am
Thu April 17, 2014

To Increase Productivity, UPS Monitors Drivers' Every Move

Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:33 am

The American workforce might want to pay attention to all those brown trucks full of cardboard boxes. UPS is using technology in ways that may soon be common throughout the economy.

On the surface, UPS trucks look the same as they did more than 20 years ago, when Bill Earle started driving for the company in rural Pennsylvania.

But underneath the surface, Earle says, the job has changed a lot. The thing you sign your name on when the UPS guy gives you a package used to be a piece of paper. Now it's a computer that tells Earle everything he needs to know.

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Book News: Did Amazon Unintentionally Create A Drug Dealer Starter Kit?

An employee prepares an order at Amazon's fulfillment center in San Bernardino, Calif.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 8:53 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Business
5:43 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Farmer Disputes Georgia's Release Date For Vidalia Onions

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:41 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Our last word in business today is: Illegal Onions.

A major Vidalia onions grower in Georgia has begun shipping the first truckloads of his harvest to supermarkets. No big deal, right? But, in fact, farmer Delbert Bland might be breaking the law.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Under Pressure To Cut Costs, Wall Street Banks Downsize

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:41 am

Many banks report earnings this week. Bank of America turned in a loss after taking a big charge for legal expenses. Citigroup will lay off about 300 stock and bond traders in an effort to cut costs.

NPR Story
4:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Does Business Innovation Depend On A CEO's Age?

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:41 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

One of the keys to success for a company or even a country is the ability to innovate, to create new ideas and products that change how people work, live and behave. And there's now new research suggesting that innovation could depend on the age of the people in charge. Of course innovation is just one measure of success. NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam has returned to join us. Shankar, good morning to you.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Hi, David.

GREENE: So what's this new research about?

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Parallels
2:28 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Meet The Sisters Saving Spanish Horses From Slaughter

Virginia Solera Garcia helps runs the CYD Santa Maria shelter with her sister, Concordia Márquez, adopting horses that might otherwise end up in the food supply.
Jorge Guerrero AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:55 am

It's been four years since Spain's construction-fueled economy collapsed, leaving 57 percent of young Spaniards out of work. Noisy protesters occupy Madrid's streets every weekend, demanding jobs and an end to punishing austerity.

But there is another, voiceless victim of the country's economic crash: Spanish horses.

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