Bill Hightower

Primary results are in, and incumbent governor Kay Ivey will face Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox in the November 2018 gubernatorial election.

Governor Ivey managed to avoid a runoff against a field of opponents including Huntsville Mayor Tommy Battle, evangelist Scott Dawson, and State Senator Bill Hightower.

She is seeking to win the governorship outright for the first time; she inherited the position after then-Governor Robert Bentley resigned in April 2017 amid a sex-tinged scandal.

In a response to her primary challengers, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey has released a letter from her doctor saying the 73-year-old governor is in "excellent health."

Ivey's campaign released the letter yesterday after her challengers indirectly made a political issue of the frontrunner's age and health.

In the brief letter from Dr. Brian Elrod of Montgomery, the doctor wrote that he sees "no medical issues that would prevent her from fulfilling her obligations as governor."

Alabama’s incumbent governor Kay Ivey is rounding the corner toward the June primary elections with a commanding fundraising lead.

According to fundraising reports filed earlier this week, Ivey has raised a total of $3.6 million. She became governor last year after her predecessor Robert Bentley resigned amid a scandal and impeachment calls.

While Ivey has started spending on TV ads, she still has $1.7 million in hand going into the peak of campaign season.

State Senator Slade Blackwell has dropped out of the race for Alabama governor, shortly after having announced his surprise candidacy.

Alabama Republican Party spokesperson Katie Lansford says Blackwell withdrew from the race yesterday. He had initially planned to run for another term in his Mountain Brook senate district, but signed up to run for governor just before the qualifying deadline on Friday instead.

The Alabama Senate voted to protect faith-based adoption organizations refusing to place children with gay parents or in certain other households because of their religious beliefs.

The Alabama Senate approved that bill on a 22-9 vote yesterday.

The legislation would prohibit the state from refusing to license or sign contracts with faith-based adoption groups that refuse certain adoption placements because of their religious beliefs.