autism

An Alabama bill requiring some insurers to cover autism treatment for children is set to become law.

The state House of Representatives voted unanimously yesterday morning to go along with Senate changes and send the bill to the governor. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey's press office has indicated she will sign the bill later this morning unless a legal review finds problems.

The mandate applies to employers with 51 or more employees.

The Alabama Senate has voted in favor of a bill that would require insurers to cover autism therapy but only until the child turns 18.

Senators voted 33-1 Tuesday to mandate the coverage of applied behavioral analysis, an intensive therapy for those with autism.

The House approved the bill unanimously earlier this session. The bill now heads back to the House, where Representatives will decide whether to go along with Senate changes to the bill.

A bill requiring insurance companies in the state to pay for autism therapy has passed the Senate budget committee. But the committee chairman is threatening not to advance the bill, as he continues negotiations.

Senators are asking a budget committee to vote this week on an autism bill that would require insurers to pay for an intensive therapy.

Senator Dick Brewbaker of Pike Road said Tuesday that 26 of 35 senators signed a petition asked for a committee vote this week instead of waiting. Brewbaker says the bill deserves a vote because the legislative clock is rapidly winding down

The state House of Representatives unanimously approved a bill that would mandate insurance coverage for autism therapy.

Representatives voted 100-0 in favor of the bill yesterday. It now moves to the Alabama Senate. The bill mandates coverage of an autism treatment called applied behavioral analysis therapy. The Autism Society of Alabama says Alabama is one of only five states that does not require the coverage. Parents whose children have autism and have received the therapy have called it “life-changing”, but it’s also very expensive.

Alabama senators are seeking to rename Selma's Edmund Pettus Bridge to the Journey to Freedom Bridge. The historic site in the voting rights movement bears the name of a Ku Klux Klan officer.

The bridge became a symbol of the fight for voting rights after marchers were beaten by state troopers in 1965.

It is Selma's most notable landmark, but its KKK association has drawn the anger of some in the majority black city. Pettus was a U.S senator, a Confederate general and a KKK grand dragon.

Autism and Pets

Apr 26, 2014
Xena the Warrior Puppy Facebook page

For years people believed that interaction with companion animals was helpful for children with autism, providing them with unconditional love, nonjudgemental friendship, and social interaction.  A new study shows that dogs can provide very real benefits for these children.

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