Arts & Life

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Joel McHale made a name for himself by skewering celebrities and the world they live in on E! Network's The Soup. Then he became a celebrity in his own right: He was in the hit NBC show Community and now he stars in the new CBS comedy The Great Indoors.

In a new memoir, McHale again takes aim at the nature of celebrity — by making fun of celebrity memoirs. It's called Thanks for the Money: How to Use My Life Story to Become the Best Joel McHale You Can Be, and it's full of anecdotes from McHale's life that are both real and imagined.

The Best And Worst Halloween Candy, Ranked

Oct 29, 2016
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After 15 seasons in the NFL, Steve Young became the first left-handed quarterback ever voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He tells his story in a new memoir, QB: My Life Behind the Spiral.

We've heard that Young is a great, great, great grandson of Brigham Young, the second president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. So we've invited him to play a game called "Not so great great great grandsons" — three questions about grandsons who didn't quite live up to their famous forefathers.

American Humane Association

The Emerging Hero category honors the partnership that often develops between human and dog. Some of these animals are trained in such areas as detection of diseases such as cancer,  others are just pets who, without any special training, instinctively assist their human companions, and some are overcomers who have triumphed over adversity in an extraordinary way.  "Overcomer" - that's Hooch!

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The Berlin Wall was a scar — a concrete and barbed wire boundary that divided families, East and West, communism and capitalism, tyranny and democracy. People died trying to climb over it while others labored to carve tunnels beneath it.

"Blow not your broth at Table," George Washington wrote in an early school exercise on civility. And "bedew no mans face with your Spittle." Wise man.

Other etiquette rules hold up less well over time ("to Pull off the Hat when there is no need is Affectation.") More recently, Emily Post warned young ladies against unchaperoned boating with young men, lest a sudden fog delay them and her reputation be ruined (sudden fog, as you perhaps know, is prime cover for you-know-what).

Comedian Tracey Ullman is known for her spot-on impersonations of Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and much more.

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It's almost unfair to talk to comedian Tracey Ullman on the radio. She's best known for her spot-on impersonations in which she doesn't just sound like - she also looks like - German Chancellor Angela Merkel or Dame Judi Dench or Dame Maggie Smith.

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Those first bubbles were almost a revelation. A couple of days before, I had mixed together flour and water into a paste. But now pockets of gas percolated through that seemingly inert glob. It was breathing. It was alive.

This gloppy mess, exuding a whiff of vinegar, was my nascent sourdough starter. When mature, it would be a pungent brew of yeasts and bacteria, a complex ecosystem that would hopefully yield delicious loaves of sourdough bread.

Opening Credits

Oct 28, 2016

Sit back and relax as we revisit "Spin-offs," a mash-up game featuring *brilliant* spin-off pitches for popular TV shows, and "You Call That An Ending?", a game examining questionable TV series finales.

Heard on TV Favorites

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Cliffhanger Ending

Oct 28, 2016

First, enjoy an all-new game with a phone contestant whose knowledge of popular TV characters is put to the test. Then, we hear terrible 80s TV plots, and are reminded Who's The (TV) Boss. You might want to readjust your recliner for this one.

Heard on TV Favorites

Commercial Break

Oct 28, 2016

Refill the popcorn bowl and settle in: Jonathan Coulton and They Might Be Giants alter classic TV theme songs to be about more recent series. Then New Yorker critic Emily Nussbaum tells Ophira Eisenberg what it's like to get paid to watch TV (spoiler: it's awesome) before leading a game featuring excerpts from her own reviews.

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As you read this, we at Pop Culture Happy Hour are preparing for our final west coast stop at the Now Hear This podcast festival in Anaheim on Saturday, October 29, after the four shows we recently did in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. We had an enormous amount of fun with our fourth chairs: Audie Cornish in Seattle and Portland, Mallory Ortberg in San Francisco, and Kumail Nanjiani in L.A. And this week, we're bringing you a mix of two segments from those shows.

Artist Ragnar Kjartansson stands surrounded by women in gold strapless gowns. One by one, the women climb onto a slowly rotating pedestal to practice their performance: strumming an E minor chord on a golden guitar for two and a half hours. The group is rehearsing in a cavernous gallery at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. The piece, Woman in E, is a new-ish work by Kjartansson, one of the art world's biggest stars.

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It might seem that Dan Brown takes his art-history/conspiracy thrillers very seriously. Yet there's one clue, hidden in plain sight, that he doesn't: He keeps letting director Ron Howard turn them into silly movies. Maybe it's Howard or producer Brian Grazer who's nervous about the moderately subversive elements in Brown's cleverly plotted, clunkily written novels. Or perhaps it's star Tom Hanks, the usually gung-ho actor who plays Brown's hero, Harvard professor Robert Langdon, with an uncharacteristic skepticism.

Iggy Pop cares very deeply about things that are cool. This is clear throughout Gimme Danger, the new documentary about the legendary rock band The Stooges, just based on the choices their wild, writhing, frequently shirtless frontman makes at every stage of his career: jumping into the crowd during his shows, squatting in a house in Detroit after the 1967 riots, taking advantage of a post-breakup contract with David Bowie to reunite the band on someone else's dime.

As the host of the Peabody Award-winning series Parts Unknown, Anthony Bourdain has visited conflict zones like Beirut, Congo, Gaza and Libya — places his CNN colleagues routinely cover. But Bourdain is clear that he doesn't want to be mistaken for a journalist.

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I think often about cities and the stories we tell about them.

Gruel, glop, cooked mush. The English language has been less than kind in describing porridge. Which seems a tad ungrateful, really, considering that grains cooked in water or milk fed our earliest civilizations.

But now, this stalwart dish is staging a culinary comeback.

Think steaming, cumin-scented millet topped with coarsely grated Gruyere cheese. Buckwheat cooked in coconut milk, with buttered dates and cinnamon. Teff polenta garlanded with diced dandelion greens and freshly grated parmesan.

Amazon's new 10-part series Good Girls Revolt was inspired by a landmark 1970 case involving a group of women working at Newsweek magazine who sued their employers for gender discrimination. At the show's fictitious News of the Week magazine, women begin to rise up, too.

Imagine: the chance to live on an uninhabited tropical island for a month, off the grid, creating art.

No phone, no television, no Internet.

Instead, spectacular night skies, crystalline turquoise waters and extraordinary marine life on the coral reef just a short swim from your back door.

This week, Alt.Latino takes a literary turn as we explore the world of Latino noir.

Good guys, bad guys and cops who are both; murder, intrigue and gallows humor; highly stylized writing — it's all there, as with any noir fiction. But these books and stories are written by Latinx authors.

What The Real Witches Of America Eat

Oct 26, 2016

What do witches eat? If you're thinking of blood and feathers and cauldrons bubbling with eye of newt and toe of frog, you couldn't be more off-menu.

The correct, and disappointingly dull, answer is pizza, bread, fruit, nuts, granola bars, Cornish hens, Dunkin' Donuts, Starbucks coffee, leg of lamb, beer, cheese, Merlot, frozen cheesecake and other supermarket comestibles.

I Shall Faint: 'Unmentionable' Unpacks Victorian Womanhood

Oct 26, 2016

Victorian manners occupy a space both sublimely funny and quietly horrific. With deeply specific and often counter-intuitive advice, Victorian pundits attempted to establish class markers and prescribe "acceptable" behavior that tended to come down harder on women than on men.

How specific and stifling? When at a dinner party, a lady eyeing the dessert course would have to hope a man was willing to cut her pear for her, as she was implicitly discouraged from doing it herself.

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