Arts & Life

Arts & Life
9:38 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Inside The Musical Mind Of Composer Philip Glass

Composer Philip Glass performs his La Belle et la Bête (Beauty and the Beast) concert, as part of the Budapest Spring Festival in the Palace of Arts in Budapest, Hungary in 2014. (MTI, Balazs Mohai/AP)

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 1:43 pm

Composer Philip Glass is known for his haunting, minimalist (though he doesn’t like that term) sound in operas like “Einstein on the Beach” and scores for films such as “The Fog of War.” He’s now written a memoir, “Words Without Music,” which he discussed with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

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Book Reviews
9:15 am
Tue April 14, 2015

'Cold Silver' Drags Epic Fantasy Through The Mud, Wonderfully

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 2:54 pm

Early in A Crown for Cold Silver — the debut novel by Alex Marshall (a pseudonym for an established author striking off in an epic new direction) — an old woman's battle scars are mistaken for matronly wrinkles. It's a tiny detail, but it speaks volumes. In Marshall's fictional, vaguely medieval world, Cobalt Zosia is a legendary retired general who once led her fearsome Five Villains to victory in a land rife with injustice, mostly of the haves-and-have-nots variety.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue April 14, 2015

'Gutshot' Is Gloriously Grand Guignol

Gutshot, by Amelia Gray
Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 11:22 am

There's a label that occasionally gets slapped on works like these. I'm sure you've heard it before: "This book," reads the label's inevitably bold lettering, "is not for the faint of heart."

It's put there sometimes by censors, more often by sensationalizing marketers, and it always aims to warn you about things like Amelia Gray's Gutshot — a book brimming with blood, sexual deviance, mucus and madness. A book, in other words, that won't fail to make you shudder once or twice.

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Code Switch
3:14 am
Tue April 14, 2015

How Asian-Americans Found A Home In The World Of K-Pop

Asian music hitmaker Jae Chong, at work in a studio in Seoul. His work is all over Asian charts, but his passport is American.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 7:33 am

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Author Interviews
4:40 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Take It From David Brooks: Career Success 'Doesn't Make You Happy'

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 10:38 am

The day after Japan surrendered in 1945, and World War II ended, singer Bing Crosby appeared on the radio program Command Performance. "Well it looks like this is it," he said. "What can you say at a time like this? You can't throw your skimmer in the air — that's for a run-of-the-mill holiday. I guess all anybody can do is thank God it's over."

New York Times columnist David Brooks cites this and other aspects of that 70-year-old radio program as evidence that America once marked triumph without boasting.

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The Salt
4:25 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Clear Fruit Brandies Pack An Orchard Into A Bottle

A pear in a bottle at Westford Hill Distillery's orchard in Ashford, Conn.
Courtesy of Westford Hill Distillers

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 1:26 pm

Every springtime in the lovely Alsace region of France, people stand in blossoming pear orchards, sliding glass bottles over tender young pears. The workers fasten the bottles securely to nearby branches, and then wait a few months for each tiny pear to grow and ripen in its own little glass greenhouse.

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The Salt
2:54 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Sandwich Monday: Breakfast In A Tin

Contains egg nugget.
NPR

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 10:14 am

[Sandwich Monday note: Gillian is our resident British Person.]

Americans often look upon British food as bland and stodgy, so for this week's Sandwich Monday, I decided to prove everyone wrong with my offer of Hunger Breaks All Day Breakfast: a can of baked beans, sausage, bacon and "egg nuggets." After a trip across the Atlantic, we blitzed our meal in the microwave, then poured it back into the can for the complete experience. A cup of strong tea and drizzle are optional.

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The Two-Way
1:44 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Alan Turing Notebook Sells For More Than $1 Million At Auction

A page from the notebook of World War II code-breaking genius Alan Turing is displayed along with his portrait. The 56-page manuscript sold Monday for more than $1 million.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 2:36 pm

A handwritten notebook by Alan Turing, the British mathematician credited with breaking German codes during World War II, sold for more than $1 million at auction Monday in New York. It is the first time a manuscript by Turing, a pioneer in computer science, has come to public market, according to Bonhams.

Bonhams says it is currently unable to reveal the identity of the buyer.

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Author Interviews
12:46 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

How Young People Went Underground During The '70s 'Days Of Rage'

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Monkey See
9:37 am
Mon April 13, 2015

The Hapless 'Veep' Staff Trips Itself Up As Selina Ascends

Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Selina Meyer on HBO's Veep.
Patrick Harbron HBO

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 12:02 pm

One of the central conceits of the first season of HBO's Veep was the carnival of humiliations suffered by Selina Meyer, played so brilliantly by Julia Louis-Dreyfus, in her capacity as vice president. She battled for relevance while waiting for the phone to ring, surrounded by a staff even more determinedly clinging to shreds of power and significance than she was. Later, Selina wound up battling primary opponents in her own bid to become president — a path that proved to have its own endless frustrations.

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Book Review
8:00 am
Mon April 13, 2015

Journey to the Wilderness

Title:  Journey to the Wilderness
Author:  Frye Gaillard  

Transcript and audio to be added soon.

Remembrances
6:43 am
Mon April 13, 2015

Günter Grass, Who Confronted Germany's Past As Well As His Own, Dies At 87

German writer Günter Grass arrives at Günter Grass-Haus, a museum in Luebeck, Germany, for his 80th birthday celebration on Oct. 27, 2007.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 6:53 pm

Günter Grass wrote more than 30 plays, novels, books of poems, essays and memoirs. He was also a visual artist and sculptor. He won the 1999 Nobel Prize in Literature. He died of undisclosed causes in the German town of Lübeck, his publisher, Steidl Verlag, confirmed. He was 87 years old.

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Author Interviews
4:52 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

From Harpies To Heroines: How Shakespeare's Women Evolved

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 5:43 pm

Tina Packer has spent a lifetime researching Shakespeare and his plays, both as an actress and as a director. And as she focused on the role that women play in his works, she noticed a progression.

Consider Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, one of his earliest plays, which centers on a man breaking a defiant woman's spirit. Strong-willed Kate is a harridan; her compliant sister, meanwhile, says things like, "Sir, to your pleasure humbly I subscribe."

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Poetry
4:52 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

I Saw The All-Stars Of Our Generation Honor Allen Ginsberg's 'Howl'

Poet Allen Ginsberg reads his poem "Howl" outside the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., Oct. 19, 1994, before a hearing on the constitutionality of a FCC policy restricting indecent material.
Dennis Cook AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 2:05 pm

Sixty years ago in San Francisco, Allen Ginsberg penned a poem that opened with the now-famous lines:

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked,
dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix ...

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Time Machine
6:54 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Meditating On Maisie Dobbs, Our Favorite Intuitive Detective Psychologist

Originally published on

I'm a romance advocate, and one reason I love romance novels is because they're full of strong, smart, resilient women. But, like many romance fans, I read eclectically – which brings me to another strong, smart woman: Maisie Dobbs, the World War I nurse-turned-sleuth created by Jacqueline Winspear.

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