Arts & Life

Music Reviews
1:53 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

K'Naan Brings Down Walls On 'Country, God Or The Girl'

K'Naan's new album is titled Country, God or the Girl.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 6:06 pm

The Somali-born rapper and singer-songwriter K'Naan can sure pack a lot into a 3-1/2-minute pop song: clever wit, heartfelt angst, a hook you can't shake — and, in the new track "Hurt Me Tomorrow," honky-tonk piano. That's the sort of quirk that helped win K'Naan his earliest fans. All sorts of eccentricities survive on Country, God or the Girl, his most expansive and elaborately produced work to date. Mostly, though, the new album soars with pairings of sharp, confessional rap and catchy vocal hooks.

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Music Reviews
12:40 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

Budapest Quartet Gets To The Heart Of Beethoven

The Budapest String Quartet in 1919.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Wed October 17, 2012 11:42 am

The Budapest String Quartet has always been my standard-bearer for chamber music. I grew up listening to their recordings, and especially admired not only their gorgeous sound, but also the uncanny interaction among all four players, even when there were changes in personnel. They had a way of playing as if they were speaking to each other, expressing deep and sometimes complicated feelings.

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The Two-Way
12:36 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

Citigroup CEO's Exit Leaves Wall Street Scratching Its Head

Vikram Pandit on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on in June.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Today's announcement that Vikram Pandit had abruptly resigned as chief executive of banking giant Citigroup has left competitors, analysts and media pundits stunned and sputtering.

"This comes as a huge surprise," William George, a Goldman Sachs board member, said in an interview on CNBC.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
12:15 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

Should We Ration End-Of-Life Care?

Sally Pipes and Ken Connor argue against the motion "Ration End-of-Life Care" in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.
Samuel LaHoz

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 2:19 pm

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

As the presidential candidates make their cases to the nation, health care is taking up a lot of talking points. But one subject that's less likely to be debated forthrightly is end-of-life care.

A big driver of U.S. health care expenditure is what's spent in the last year of life. Those who argue in favor of rationing that care say the country cannot afford to provide unlimited health care — either the government or insurance companies have to ration end-of-life care as a policy response.

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Asia
11:03 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Reporter On Friendship With Malala Yousafzai

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we've been talking a lot about the national debt this election year, but did you know that Americans, as a group, owe more than a trillion dollars in student loan debt? In a few minutes, we'll speak with a former college professor, who says faculty advisors need to be doing more to help students think that through. That's in just a few minutes.

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Arts & Life
9:21 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Restored Covered Bridges in Blount Co. to Reopen

The Easley Covered Bridge near Rosa, Alabama.
en.wikipedia.org

Two of three historic covered bridges in Blount County are set to reopen to traffic next week.

Blount County Commission Chairman Chris Green tells al.com (http://bit.ly/RvV1kp ) restoration is complete except for some final details on the Swann and Easley covered bridges. The county is planning a ribbon cutting at the west end of the Swann Bridge at 11 a.m. Monday.

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Television
4:58 am
Tue October 16, 2012

A Check On How The Fall TV Season Is Going

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 9:45 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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NPR Story
3:52 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Umpire Calls Are A Problem In Baseball's Post Play

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 9:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the baseball playoffs tonight, the Detroit Tigers have a chance to put the reeling New York Yankees on the brink of elimination. Meanwhile, the San Francisco Giants have slowed the St. Louis Cardinals who'd been playing with the kind of magic touch that carried them to last year's World Series title. Last night in San Francisco, the Giants beat St. Louis 7-1 to even their National League Championship Series at one game each. NPR's sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us to talk more baseball.

Good morning.

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The Salt
2:03 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Urban Parisian Vines Produce Wine With A Drop Of History

Crowds watch as Clos Montmartre's grapes are harvested during its annual October wine festival.
Jacque Brinon AP

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 9:45 am

In America, vineyards are usually tucked in out-of-the-way rural areas, among country lanes. But in France, where great wine is a way of life, vineyards are everywhere — even in the middle of the country's biggest city.

High on the hills of the neighborhood of Montmartre in Paris is Clos Montmartre, the city's last working vineyard.

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Crisis In The Housing Market
2:01 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Renters No More: Newbies Lured To Homeownership

Kitsy Roberts and Janko Williams have traded a rent payment for a mortgage. The Seattle couple is planning to put a lot of sweat equity into their fixer-upper.
Wendy Kaufman NPR

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 9:45 am

In many American communities, buying a home is now less expensive than renting. And with the economics tilting in favor of homeownership, many first-time buyers are jumping into the market.

After eight years of renting, Kitsy Roberts and her husband, Janko Williams, are practically giddy about their new Seattle home. And like proud parents, they are eager to show it off, from its historic details to its fresh paint.

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Music News
1:03 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Jason Lytle Balances The Studio And A Life Outdoors

Former Grandaddy frontman Jason Lytle just released a new album, Dept. of Disappearance.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 9:45 am

Jason Lytle is the man behind the Modesto, Calif., band Grandaddy. The band released its debut in 1997, but it was Grandaddy's second album — The Sophtware Slump — that broke through with critics and fans. Even David Bowie called himself a fan when he approached the band members after seeing them play.

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Movie Interviews
1:40 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Tyler Perry Transforms: From Madea To Family Man

Tyler Perry is currently starring in the new action thriller Alex Cross, which opens in theaters on Friday.
Sidney Baldwin 2012 Summit Entertainment LLC

Whenever Tyler Perry is in front of the camera, he's usually behind it as well. A screenwriter, director, producer and star, Perry grew up poor in New Orleans, but he has become a movie phenomenon — he was described in the New Yorker as the most financially successful black man the American film industry has ever known.

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Monkey See
8:00 am
Mon October 15, 2012

A Day Later, The Space Jump Guy Is OK, But How About The Rest Of Us?

Felix Baumgartner of Austria as he jumps out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on Sunday.
Red Bull Stratos AP

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:23 am

More than 7 million people were watching as Felix Baumgartner sat at the edge of his space capsule yesterday 24 miles off the ground and got ready to jump, in what was known as the "Red Bull Stratos" project, better known as the "space jump." I saw it myself; he opened the door, and there was something there that certainly seemed to be space.

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History
6:50 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Is The Nobel Prize A Boys Mostly Club?

Tawakkol Karman, a 2011 Nobel Peace Prize winner, is one of few women in the ranks of Nobel laureates.
Donnelly Marks Courtesy of Nobel Media

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:04 am

As the last of this year's Nobel Prize winners are announced and media focus shifts away from Sweden, two things are clear about the winners.

One: They have all done laudatory work in their respective fields.

Two: Aside from the European Union, which was awarded the Peace Prize, all of this year's Nobel laureates are men.

They join the ranks of hundreds of people who have received the awards over the past 111 years. But what is surprising about the list of Nobel laureates is just how few women are on it.

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Around the Nation
6:06 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Iowa Baby's Birth Is One For Number Lovers

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 6:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Katie Deremiah and Ron Fitzgerald of Des Moines, Iowa thought it was cool when their son was born on September 10th last year, offering the fun sequence: 9, 10, 11. Last week, they had a daughter, weighing 8 pounds, 9 ounces. Attention numerologists - little Laila was born on October 12th at military time 13:14, outnumbering her big brother at 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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