Arts & Life

Mass Shootings
9:28 am
Wed January 23, 2013

The Motivations of Suicidal Killers: A Conversation With Author Adam Lankford

Adam Lankford is the author of "The Myth of Martyrdom" which explores what really drives suicidal killers.
adamlankford.com

  Mass shootings seem to be on the rise lately. In light of the incident at Sandy Hook Elementary last month, everyone from the president on down to local school systems have been trying to find ways to curb gun violence and prevent such an incident from happening again.

Read more
Kitchen Window
6:38 am
Wed January 23, 2013

A Slight Twist On The Sunday Roast

Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 12:08 pm

There are certain foods that are almost as fun to say as they are to eat. This is especially true when it comes to British cuisine. There are the easy jokes about bangers and mash (sausages and mashed potatoes), bubble and squeak (fried patties of cabbage, potatoes and any other random leftovers) and stargazy pie (savory pastry with whole sardines horrifyingly poking their heads out the top crust). While it doesn't have quite the same Anglotastic drama, my favorite entry in the genre is the simple Sunday roast.

Read more
Book Reviews
6:03 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Here's To The Pleasures Of 'Drinking With Men'

iStockphoto.com

"More than anywhere else," writes Rosie Schaap, "bars are where I've figured out how to relate to others and how to be myself." It's the same for a lot of us, though many won't admit it. Americans tend to have a weirdly puritanical view of drinking, and a lot of people see bars as nothing more than havens for lowlifes and alcoholics. But as Schaap points out in her new memoir, they're missing out. "You can drink at home. But a good bar? ... It's more like a community center, for people — men and women — who happen to drink."

Read more
Movie Interviews
2:26 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Mel Brooks, 'Unhinged' And Loving It

Mel Brooks has made a name for himself with comedy classics like Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein and The Producers.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 4:28 pm

Read more
Arts & Life
9:03 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Sports Calendar's Black Hole Gives Us Time To Reflect On Sportswriters

According to commentator Frank Deford, Sports Illustrated writer Peter King — shown here during an event at Seton Hall Preparatory Academy in Dec. 2005 — is the champion model of sportswriters.
Tim Larsen AP

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 7:13 am

Sports fans are jealous of sportswriters, because it's a dream job where you get to watch games free, which is, above all, what sports fans want.

Once upon a time this was true. The sportswriters watched games, keeping score, me. . .tic. . . u. . . lous. . . ly, and then wrote it all up, so that the poor devils who had real jobs could read about the games.

Well, that's the way it was.

Read more
Arts & Life
5:12 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

NAACP President On 'Commonality' of Selma, Seneca Falls and Stonewall

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 7:48 pm

In his inaugural address, President Obama made reference to historic events in the women's rights movement, the black civil rights movement and the gay rights movement.

Read more
Arts & Life
5:11 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Gen. John Allen Cleared In Inquiry Stemming From Petraeus Scandal

Marine Gen. John Allen.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 5:57 pm

Marine Gen. John Allen has been cleared in a misconduct inquiry prompted by the extramarital-affair scandal that led to the resignation of CIA Director David Petraeus.

The Washington Post, which broke the story, reports:

Read more
Obit-Hinton Mitchem
4:59 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Longtime Ala. Democratic Sen. Hinton Mitchem Dies

Longtime Alabama Democratic Senator Hinton Mitchem has died.
Credit votesmart.org

One of Alabama's longest serving legislators, former Democratic state Senate President Pro Tem Hinton Mitchem of Union Grove, has died. He was 74.


Direct Communications President Rick Heartsill, a friend of Mitchem, says the former senator died Tuesday after a long illness.


Mitchem was a longtime tractor dealer in Albertville. He was first elected to the Albertville City Council in 1968 and then to the state House of Representatives in 1974. After serving four years in the House, he was elected to the Senate in 1978 and in 1982.

Read more
Birmingham Bombing - Congress
4:37 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Recognition Sought For Church Bombing Victims

Lawmakers want to honor the victims of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in 1963 with the Congressional Gold Medal.

Nearly 50 years ago, white supremacists planted a bomb in a Birmingham, Ala., church that killed four young girls preparing to worship. It was an act of terror that shocked the country and propelled the Congress to pass that historic 1964 Civil Rights Act. Lawmakers now want to honor those victims of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing with the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian honor that Congress can bestow.

Read more
Arts & Life
4:36 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Can Israel Live With A Nuclear Iran?

Shmuel Bar (left) and Jeffrey Goldberg argue against the motion "Israel Can Live with a Nuclear Iran."
Samuel LaHoz

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:17 am

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

If Iran gets a nuclear weapon, what would be the impact on Israel?

Some say this would be an existential threat that Israel cannot tolerate. Iranian nuclear weapons would raise the stakes most every time there was a conflict in the region.

But others argue that Israel could live with a nuclear Iran because the Israelis have such a powerful military of their own, including nuclear capabilities. In addition, an Israeli attack on Iranian nuclear facilities could unleash a cascade of events that would further destabilize the region.

Read more
Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

A Poignant Voyage On 'The Pirogue'

More than 30 men set out to sea in the titular boat of The Pirogue. With that many actors and only an hour of time, not every character gets fleshed out — but the director's eye for singular faces helps.
ArtMattan Productions

The journey from Senegal and poverty to Europe and supposed prosperity takes seven days by fishing boat. The Pirogue spends only about an hour on open water, but that's enough to convey the risks that make the trip foolish, and the desperation that makes it inevitable.

Read more
Arts & Life
3:57 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

French Twitter Lawsuit Pits Free Speech Against Hate Speech

A wave of racist tweets prompted a Jewish student organization to file a lawsuit asking the American company Twitter to reveal the identities of users sending anti-Semitic tweets. Twitter says data on users is collected and stocked in California, where French law cannot be applied.
Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 7:48 pm

A French judge will decide this week if Twitter must hand over the identities of users sending anti-Semitic tweets. The case, brought against Twitter by a Jewish student organization, pits America's free speech guarantees against Europe's laws banning hate speech.

The controversy began in October, when the French Union of Jewish Students threatened to sue Twitter to get the names of people posting anti-Semitic tweets with the hashtag #unbonjuif, or "a good Jew."

Read more
Arts & Life
3:57 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Algeria Attack Raises Security Alarms For Energy Firms

This undated image shows the Amenas natural gas field in Algeria, where Islamist militants raided and took hostages last week. Dozens of hostages and their captors were killed when Algerian forces subsequently raided the facility.
BP AP

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 7:48 pm

The prime minister of Algeria is defending his government's response to last week's attack on a natural gas plant that left 37 hostages dead. He says the Islamic militants who were behind the attack planned to blow up the facility and would have killed a lot more people if they hadn't been stopped.

The attack happened at a huge, internationally operated facility in the Sahara. And it underscores the dangers that energy companies face when they do business in politically unstable places.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:57 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

A Historic Arrival: New York's Grand Central Turns 100

Beams of sunlight stream through the windows of Grand Central Terminal, circa 1930.
Hal Morey Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 12:44 pm

Where's the Apple store? Where's the bathroom? How do I get out of here?

Those are some of the most commonly asked questions from people visiting New York's Grand Central Terminal, according to information booth officer Audrey Johnson-Gordon. And it's no wonder: The terminal boasts passages, ramps, restaurants, stores, subway connections and more passages. It is, after all, a temple of transit, full of people going somewhere else in a hurry.

Read more
Movies
3:57 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Female Directors Make Strong Showing At Sundance

A scene from director Ryan Coogler's Fruitvale, an entry in this year's U.S. Dramatic Competition at the Sundance Film Festival. It dramatizes the 2009 shooting of an unarmed man by a Bay Area transit police officer.
Rachel Morrison Sundance Film Festival

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 4:28 pm

Sundance, the biggest American film festival, has been known for its off-kilter picks. Steven Zeitchik, arts and entertainment writer for the Los Angeles Times, tells NPR's Melissa Block that this year's gathering in Park City, Utah, is no different.

Sex Sells At Sundance

Read more

Pages