Arts & Life

Author Interviews
2:59 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

'Schroder' Chronicles A Father's Desperate Mistakes

Twelve Books

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 2:43 pm

A father embroiled in a bitter custody battle abducts his 6-year-old daughter and heads off with her through upstate New York and Vermont.

His name is Eric Kennedy and he's the desperate, complicated narrator of a new novel by Amity Gaige. Schroder is written as an explanation to his ex-wife of where he went and why he did it:

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The Salt
2:06 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

An Oscar-Nominated Guacamole: Your Friday Visual Feast

Fresh Guacamole, an Oscar-nominated short film by PES
PES

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 11:11 am

Mashed avocado hand grenades, chopped baseball onions and hand-picked light bulb chili peppers can hardly be considered an authentic recipe, but that's not going to stop a Latina like me for rooting for Fresh Guacamole in the Oscars later this month.

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Monkey See
12:39 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

They Call Me ... Bruce? When Characters Outlive Their Names

Bruce Wayne is only one of the many characters whose name makes him seem perhaps a little older than he is.
DC Comics

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 7:26 am

Look, don't get me wrong. There's nothing wrong with the name "Bruce."

There are plenty of Bruces about, and good and strong and admirable Bruces they are, contributing to society in myriad ways.

You got your Springsteen, of course. Your Campbell. Your Vilanch. Your Dern. Your ... um, Boxleitner. Your Jenner and your ... Baumgartner, was it? Baumgartner.

Bruce: A perfectly fine name. Just not as common in the U.S. as it once was, is my point.

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Monkey See
10:59 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: '30 Rock,' Getting Meta, And The PCHH FAQ

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

In case a thousand thousands of internet words haven't informed you, last night was the final episode of 30 Rock, and in addition to taking a moment to appreciate the show itself, we decided to use it as a jumping-off point for a discussion of "meta" humor — what it is, when it works, and when it just comes off like a crutch. You might be surprised to hear meta traced all the way back to childhood, but hey, that's what we're here for.

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Monkey See
10:46 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Kid President Coaches Up the Entire Internet

Screenshot

If you've been online in the last week, you've probably already gotten a pep talk from Kid President.

In just a week, the viral video, starring the adorable Robby Novak, a nine-year-old from Tennesee, has already garnered over six million hits.

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Movie Reviews
9:24 am
Fri February 1, 2013

'Gatekeepers' Let Us Inside Israeli Security

The documentary The Gatekeepers examines Israeli security policy in interviews with six former heads of the secretive Shin Bet agency.
Sony Pictures Classics

The Oscar-nominated documentary The Gatekeepers centers on Israel's occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip, but from an unusual vantage — not the Palestinians or Israelis on the ground, but six men at the pinnacle of the country's security apparatus: the former heads of the security agency Shin Bet.

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NPR Story
9:16 am
Fri February 1, 2013

So A Girl Walks Into A Bar...

Ask Me Another audience members enjoy some potent potables from The Bell House's esteemed bartenders.
Steve McFarland NPR

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 5:43 pm

This week's versatile V.I.P. has had spells as an author, an ordained minister, a fortuneteller, and a bartender — which serves her well during a delectable drinking game. And with quizzes covering highfalutin children's literature, crossbred celebrities and a geologist's favorite Queen song, this week's contestants show a little versatility, too.

Monkey See
8:15 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Morning Shots: Lois Lane Has An iPad, And Linda Gray Has A Story About Her Leg

iStockphoto.com

Does Lois Lane's iPad mean that Zack Snyder's approach to Superman will be fresher and more modern than people are expecting? [The Guardian]

Too much? Too little? How much information are you supposed to hand out in a movie trailer anyway? [The New York Times]

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History
2:40 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Grand Central, A Cathedral For Commuters, Celebrates 100

Originally published on

Friday marks the day that 100 years ago, Grand Central Terminal opened its doors for business for the very first time. The largest railroad terminal in the world, the magnificent Beaux-Arts building is in the heart of New York City on 42nd St. And while it no longer serves long-distance trains, it's still a vibrant part of the city's eco-system.

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Arts & Life
5:14 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Explosion Hits State Oil Company Building In Mexico City

Firefighters belonging to the Tacubaya sector and workers dig for survivors after an explosion at a building adjacent to the executive tower of Mexico's state-owned oil company PEMEX.
Guillermo Gutierrez AP

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 9:07 pm

What appears to be a significant explosion has rocked the Pemex tower in Mexico City. Television images are showing smoke billowing from the glass high rise in the Mexican capital.

Pemex, the state-owned oil company, tweeted that an explosion happened in a building that is part of the oil giant's headquarters. According to the company and the country's interior minister, 14 people are dead and 80 are injured.

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Arts & Life
4:59 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

The Mexico-Canada Guest Worker Program: A Model For The U.S.?

Armando Tenorio at his home in Mexico last December. Tenorio spends most of the year working on a blueberry farm in Canada, on a temporary work permit, to support his family in Mexico.
Dominic Bracco II The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 12:29 pm

In the U.S., farmers and farm workers alike say the current system to import temporary workers, especially in agriculture, is slow and fraught with abuses.

But the shape of a new guest-worker program is still being hashed out. Some say the U.S. should import temporary workers the same way Canada does. For nearly four decades, the governments of Canada and Mexico have cooperated to fill agriculture jobs that Canadian citizens won't do, and that Mexicans are clamoring to get.

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Midland City Standoff
4:37 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Alabama Governor Calls Mother Of Kidnapped Boy

Governor Robert Bentley has reached out to the mother of the boy being held hostage in a bunker in southeast Alabama.
Credit Al Whitaker / WHNT News 19

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says he has called the mother of the 5-year-old Dale County boy kidnapped from his school bus on Tuesday. The boy is being held in a handmade bunker in Dale County in southeast Alabama.


Bentley said he has talked to the mother on the telephone. He described her as being "very distraught as I would be." The governor has four grown sons.


The governor said he and other state officials are "hoping for a peaceful" resolution of the situation.

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Arts & Life
4:36 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Cyclo-Cross Championship Takes U.S. By Storm, Mud And Sand

Competitors in a men's category race in the 2013 National Cyclo-cross Championships in Bradford, England, this month. The sport requires riders to traverse mud and sand on off-road courses peppered with obstacles.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 6:55 pm

While many Americans will be tuning into the Super Bowl on Sunday, there's another big sports competition this weekend: the Cyclo-Cross World Championships. This weekend's event, in Louisville, Ky., marks the first time in its 60-year history that the world championships will be held outside of Europe.

Cyclo-cross, a grueling sport requiring riders to traverse mud, sand and other obstacles, is growing rapidly in the U.S. And the fans can be a bit crazy. At the 2012 Louisville Derby City Cup, hundreds of people — some in costumes — packed onto the course to cheer the riders on.

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Arts & Life
4:31 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

As U.S. Consumes Less Cocaine, Brazil Uses More

Brazilian federal police patrol the Mamore River, which separates Brazil from Bolivia. The river is used by traffickers to ferry cocaine from Bolivia into Brazil, where cocaine consumption is rising rapidly.
Juan Forero Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 6:55 pm

As cocaine consumption falls in the United States, South American drug traffickers have begun to pioneer a new soft target for their product: big and increasingly affluent Brazil.

And the source of the cocaine is increasingly Bolivia, a landlocked country that shares a 2,100-mile border with Brazil.

As Brazilian police officers and border agents can attest, the drug often finds its way to Brazil by crossing the Mamore River, which separates the state of Rondonia from Bolivia in the heart of South America.

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Movie Reviews
4:17 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

In Prison And Among Zombies, Shakespeare's Reflection Shines

In the Romeo and Juliet-inspired Warm Bodies, a zombie known only as R (Nicholas Hoult) falls in love with Julie (Teresa Palmer), who's still human.
Jan Thijs Summit Entertainment

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 9:39 am

The Italian art-house film Caesar Must Die and the teen zombie-comedy Warm Bodies do not, at first glance, appear to have much in common. But they share a bit of creative DNA, both being inventive riffs that turn Shakespearean tragedies into something else entirely.

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