Arts & Life

Food
2:37 am
Tue February 12, 2013

An Italian-Inspired Valentine's Feast From 'Nigellissima'

If you can't find pennette, use the small bulging crescents that are chifferi, or regular elbow macaroni, instead.
Courtesy Random House

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 12:51 pm

Before the roses and the romance, Valentine's Day commemorated the Roman Saint Valentine — Valentinus, in Latin. And in her new cookbook, Nigellissima: Easy Italian-Inspired Recipes, chef Nigella Lawson offers up simple recipes that celebrate the cuisine of the country Saint Valentine called home.

Lawson joins NPR's Renee Montagne to share some recipes for a romantic dinner for two, and describes the time she spent in Italy.

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Ledbetter Movie
5:29 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Ala.'s Lilly Ledbetter Signs Pact To Make Movie

Lilly Ledbetter with President Barack Obama.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

An Alabama woman has struck a deal with a Hollywood filmmaker to make a movie about her long battle for women to receive equal pay as men.


Lilly Ledbetter's long struggle to receive equal pay for the time she worked as a supervisor at the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. plant in Gadsden led to the first bill Barack Obama signed into law as president.


Ledbetter's attorney Jon Goldfarb of Birmingham says she has signed an agreement with Hollywood filmmaker Rachel Feldman.He says details about the cast or where the movie will be made have not been finalized.

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The Salt
5:28 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Less Potent Maker's Mark Not Going Down Smoothly In Kentucky

With too little distilled bourbon to meet demand, Maker's Mark is lowering the product's alcohol content from 90 to 84 proof.
Ed Reinke AP

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 6:58 pm

Kentucky is bourbon country. Bar shelves in Louisville are stocked with a crowded field of premium bourbons; the city's Theater Square Marketplace restaurant alone carries close to 170 different brands. So when news trickled out that longtime distillery Maker's Mark plans to water down its bourbon, locals were stunned.

Bourbon has to be aged at least two years — and that's where Maker's Mark got in trouble. Chief Operating Officer Rob Samuels says the company simply didn't make enough.

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Book Review
3:53 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Chinaberries and Crows: An Anthology

“Chinaberries and Crows: An Anthology”

Editor: Bert Hitchcock

Publisher: Solomon & George Publishers

Pages: 220

Price: $20.00 (Paper)

At a time when independent bookstores are going out of business all over America, the Gnu’s Room –it’s a pun—in Auburn, Alabama, makes a lot of sense. It is organized as a nonprofit bookstore, mainly used books, and as a local center for the arts: literary, visual and performing.

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Technology
3:11 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Video Game Violence: Why Do We Like It, And What's It Doing To Us?

A typical scene from Call of Duty: Black Ops 2, the latest in the series of wildly popular video games.
Activision

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 8:57 am

Violent video games have been a small part of the national conversation about gun violence in recent weeks. The big question: Does violence in games make people more violent in the real world?

The answer is unclear, but one thing is obvious: Violence sells games. The most popular video game franchise is Call of Duty, a war game where killing is the goal.

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Book Reviews
2:15 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Larry Brown: A Writer’s Life

  “Larry Brown: A Writer’s Life”

Author: Jean W. Cash

Publisher: University of Mississippi Press

Pages: 400

Price: $35.00 (Cloth)

Late in the evening of November 23, 2004, the Mississippi writer Larry Brown said to his wife, Mary Annie, what were just about his last words. “I’m ready to go to bed….Life’s good now, ain’t it?”

Brown died of a heart attack the next morning.

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Author Interviews
1:33 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

An 'Autopsy' Of Detroit Finds Resilience In A Struggling City

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and Detroit native Charlie LeDuff says that the city must forget the future and instead focus on the present. His new book is called Detroit: An American Autopsy.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 9:36 am

For some, Detroit may be a symbol of urban decay; but to Charlie LeDuff, it's home. LeDuff, a veteran print and TV journalist who spent 12 years at The New York Times, where he shared a Pulitzer Prize in 2001, returned home to the city after the birth of his daughter left him and his wife — also a Detroit native — wanting to be closer to family.

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Arts & Life
10:16 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Valentine's Advice: Love & Manners

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 10:32 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. It's almost Valentine's Day and we realize that, along with the avalanche of pink hearts and stuff, there's also an avalanche of questions at this time of year from whether it's OK to romance by text message to how do you decide who pays for dinner to how to figure out whether you're in love or just, you know, stuck in the friend zone.

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Alabama Weather
8:48 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Storms Drench Parts of Alabama, Damage Homes

A crew from the National Weather Service plans to inspect storm damage in southwestern Alabama to determine whether damage to homes in the area was caused for a tornado or high winds.

Preliminary reports from the weather service indicate that homes were damaged near the small community of St. Stephens, a few miles outside Jackson. Survey crews were planning to assess the damage on Monday.

Forecasters say more than 4 inches of rain has fallen in parts of the Alabama -- and the totals are continuing to climb.

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The Two-Way
6:06 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Book News: Pablo Neruda's Body Will Be Exhumed For Autopsy

Chilean poet and diplomat Pablo Neruda in Stockholm with his wife Matilda after he received the Nobel Prize for literature.
Keystone Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
6:03 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Feb. 11-17: Romance, Clockwork, Secrets And Empire

Vintage Books

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Christine Sneed, Peter Carey, Nell Freudenberger and Tom Holland.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

You Must Read This
6:03 am
Mon February 11, 2013

On The 50th Anniversary Of Sylvia Plath's Death, A Look At Her Beginning

Sylvia Plath

Craig Morgan Teicher's latest collection of poetry is called To Keep Love Blurry.

Fifty years ago today, Sylvia Plath ended her life as a major poet and an artist of the highest order. But one could hardly have predicted, from her taut yet unfocused first book, The Colossus, her only book of poetry published in her lifetime, that she would, or even could, become the poet we know, revere — and maybe even fear — as Sylvia Plath.

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Music
2:35 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Hollywood's 'Hooray': Hardly A Happy Hymn

Doris Day's somber 1958 version of "Hooray for Hollywood," which was included on an album of the same name, better reflects the song's creatively complicated lyrics.
Sony Picture Archives

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 10:41 am

When the Oscars are handed out later this month, the ceremony will most likely be punctuated by music that has pretty much come to stand for movies and Movieland. Ironically, the composer grew up in Detroit, and the lyricist came from Savannah, Ga. — yet together they wrote the quintessential Tinseltown anthem.

"Hooray for Hollywood" was written for the Warner Brothers film Hollywood Hotel. It was a corny little "let's-go-to-Hollywood-and become-stars" movie from 1937, with some cute dialogue.

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Book Reviews
12:00 am
Mon February 11, 2013

The Cruise of the Rolling Junk

The Cruise of the Rolling Junk
Author:  F. Scott Fitzgerald

“The Cruise of the Rolling Junk”

Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald

Introduction by Julian Evans

Foreword by Paul Theroux

Publisher: Hesperus Press Limited

Pages: 92

Price: $11.95 (paper)

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Arts & Life
4:41 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

California State University Seeks Black Students From The Pews

Students stand in the back row of a filled chemistry class at the California State University East Bay in Hayward, Calif., in September 2009. Officials from the Cal State system are seeking new prospective African-American students in church pews.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 1:25 pm

At church on Sundays, African-American students are hearing a possibly unexpected pitch alongside the familiar sermon: Come to Cal State University.

Officials from the California State University system have been pioneering a program of seeking new prospective African-American students in church pews — a program that's serving as a model for similar efforts elsewhere.

Blacks make up about 6.6 percent of California's population, according to 2011 census data. Jorge Haynes, a Cal State spokesman, said the university system's African-American population is 5 percent.

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