Arts & Life

Book Reviews
2:15 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Larry Brown: A Writer’s Life

  “Larry Brown: A Writer’s Life”

Author: Jean W. Cash

Publisher: University of Mississippi Press

Pages: 400

Price: $35.00 (Cloth)

Late in the evening of November 23, 2004, the Mississippi writer Larry Brown said to his wife, Mary Annie, what were just about his last words. “I’m ready to go to bed….Life’s good now, ain’t it?”

Brown died of a heart attack the next morning.

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Author Interviews
1:33 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

An 'Autopsy' Of Detroit Finds Resilience In A Struggling City

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and Detroit native Charlie LeDuff says that the city must forget the future and instead focus on the present. His new book is called Detroit: An American Autopsy.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 9:36 am

For some, Detroit may be a symbol of urban decay; but to Charlie LeDuff, it's home. LeDuff, a veteran print and TV journalist who spent 12 years at The New York Times, where he shared a Pulitzer Prize in 2001, returned home to the city after the birth of his daughter left him and his wife — also a Detroit native — wanting to be closer to family.

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Arts & Life
10:16 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Valentine's Advice: Love & Manners

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 10:32 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. It's almost Valentine's Day and we realize that, along with the avalanche of pink hearts and stuff, there's also an avalanche of questions at this time of year from whether it's OK to romance by text message to how do you decide who pays for dinner to how to figure out whether you're in love or just, you know, stuck in the friend zone.

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Alabama Weather
8:48 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Storms Drench Parts of Alabama, Damage Homes

A crew from the National Weather Service plans to inspect storm damage in southwestern Alabama to determine whether damage to homes in the area was caused for a tornado or high winds.

Preliminary reports from the weather service indicate that homes were damaged near the small community of St. Stephens, a few miles outside Jackson. Survey crews were planning to assess the damage on Monday.

Forecasters say more than 4 inches of rain has fallen in parts of the Alabama -- and the totals are continuing to climb.

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The Two-Way
6:06 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Book News: Pablo Neruda's Body Will Be Exhumed For Autopsy

Chilean poet and diplomat Pablo Neruda in Stockholm with his wife Matilda after he received the Nobel Prize for literature.
Keystone Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
6:03 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Feb. 11-17: Romance, Clockwork, Secrets And Empire

Vintage Books

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Christine Sneed, Peter Carey, Nell Freudenberger and Tom Holland.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

You Must Read This
6:03 am
Mon February 11, 2013

On The 50th Anniversary Of Sylvia Plath's Death, A Look At Her Beginning

Sylvia Plath

Craig Morgan Teicher's latest collection of poetry is called To Keep Love Blurry.

Fifty years ago today, Sylvia Plath ended her life as a major poet and an artist of the highest order. But one could hardly have predicted, from her taut yet unfocused first book, The Colossus, her only book of poetry published in her lifetime, that she would, or even could, become the poet we know, revere — and maybe even fear — as Sylvia Plath.

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Music
2:35 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Hollywood's 'Hooray': Hardly A Happy Hymn

Doris Day's somber 1958 version of "Hooray for Hollywood," which was included on an album of the same name, better reflects the song's creatively complicated lyrics.
Sony Picture Archives

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 10:41 am

When the Oscars are handed out later this month, the ceremony will most likely be punctuated by music that has pretty much come to stand for movies and Movieland. Ironically, the composer grew up in Detroit, and the lyricist came from Savannah, Ga. — yet together they wrote the quintessential Tinseltown anthem.

"Hooray for Hollywood" was written for the Warner Brothers film Hollywood Hotel. It was a corny little "let's-go-to-Hollywood-and become-stars" movie from 1937, with some cute dialogue.

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Book Reviews
12:00 am
Mon February 11, 2013

The Cruise of the Rolling Junk

The Cruise of the Rolling Junk
Author:  F. Scott Fitzgerald

“The Cruise of the Rolling Junk”

Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald

Introduction by Julian Evans

Foreword by Paul Theroux

Publisher: Hesperus Press Limited

Pages: 92

Price: $11.95 (paper)

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Arts & Life
4:41 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

California State University Seeks Black Students From The Pews

Students stand in the back row of a filled chemistry class at the California State University East Bay in Hayward, Calif., in September 2009. Officials from the Cal State system are seeking new prospective African-American students in church pews.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 1:25 pm

At church on Sundays, African-American students are hearing a possibly unexpected pitch alongside the familiar sermon: Come to Cal State University.

Officials from the California State University system have been pioneering a program of seeking new prospective African-American students in church pews — a program that's serving as a model for similar efforts elsewhere.

Blacks make up about 6.6 percent of California's population, according to 2011 census data. Jorge Haynes, a Cal State spokesman, said the university system's African-American population is 5 percent.

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Books
4:01 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

Last Chance To Submit For Round 10 Of Three-Minute Fiction

You have until 11:59 p.m. ET Sunday to send in your original short fiction. The challenge this round is to write a story in the form of a voice mail message. Submit your story here: https://npr3mf.submittable.com/submit

Arts & Life
2:52 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

West's Allure Dulls Monkhood's Luster For Some Buddhists

Telo Tulku Rinpoche, left, prays with Buddhist monks in front of inmates in a prison colony in Kalmykia, Russia, on Sept. 7, 2010. After renouncing his monkhood, Telo Rinpoche can no longer wear traditional robes, but still serves as the region's Tibetan Buddhist spiritual leader.
Yuri Tutov AP

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 3:58 pm

In Philadelphia in 1972, an immigrant couple of Kalmyk origin gave birth to a boy they named Erdne. A few years later, the Dalai Lama renamed him Telo Tulku Rinpoche and identified him as one in a long line of reincarnations of an ancient Buddhist saint. The boy was then taken to a monastery in the mountains of southern India to learn the teachings of the Buddha.

Telo Rinpoche was one of the first of his kind: someone from the West learning thousand-year-old traditions a world away from his family.

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Arts & Life
2:30 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

New Tango Favorites From 'Global Village'

Argentinean singer Lucio Arce plays tango in the classic style.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 9:58 pm

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Arts & Life
2:29 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

As Islam Grows, U.S. Imams In Short Supply

Muslims pray during a special Eid ul-Fitr morning prayer at the Los Angeles Convention Center on Aug. 30, 2011, in Los Angeles.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 3:58 pm

Islam in America is growing exponentially. From 2000 to 2010, the number of mosques in the United States jumped 74 percent.

Today, there are more than 2,100 American mosques but they have a challenge: There aren't enough imams, or spiritual leaders, to go around.

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Author Interviews
2:28 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

Small Objects Reveal 'The Real Jane Austen'

Harper Collins

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 3:58 pm

Flotsam and Jetsam: of such things are stories made. Writers use objects to give their stories weight, attachment and verisimilitude, like Gary Paulsen's The Hatchet; Jean Shepherd's Red Ryder BB Gun inspired A Christmas Story; and how about Dashiell Hammett's The Maltese Falcon?

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