Arts & Life

World
6:10 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Canadian Man Returns To Ireland To Find Lost Love

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 10:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Sandy Crocker has gone more than 500 miles for love. The Canadian man was touring in Ireland when he met a freckled woman with reddish brown hair. They spoke for a couple minutes at a café, then she left. Back in Canada, he was heartbroken.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M GONNA BE (500 MILES)")

THE PROCLAIMERS: (Singing) But I would walk 500 miles, and I would walk 500 more...

Around the Nation
6:06 am
Mon September 24, 2012

S.C. Shooting Range Rents Automatic Weapons

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 8:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Television
4:14 am
Mon September 24, 2012

'Homeland,' 'Modern Family' Are Big Emmy Winners

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 10:10 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

"Homeland" and "Modern Family" were big winners last night at the Emmy Awards. For Showtime, the "Homeland" win was a first-ever Emmy for a drama series.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's a thriller about the CIA fighting terrorism in the U.S. It also won acting awards for Claire Danes and Damian Lewis.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE 2012 EMMY AWARDS")

Read more
Music Interviews
2:24 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Grizzly Bear On Candor, Democracy And Too Much Music

Grizzly Bear
Tom Hines Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 10:10 am

Grizzly Bear, which has just released its fourth studio album, Shields, spoke to Morning Edition host David Greene about democracy within the band, censorship and candor in interviews, and achieving success as an indie band. Hear the radio version at the audio link and read part of their conversation below.


Interview Highlights

On division of labor in Grizzly Bear

Read more
Fresh Air Weekend
8:49 pm
Sun September 23, 2012

Fresh Air Weekend: Andrew Rannells, Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan's Tempest features 10 new songs with many feisty, baffling, sometimes beautiful moments.
Courtesy of the artist

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Read more
Around the Nation
3:35 pm
Sun September 23, 2012

Rare Specimens: An Unusual Match-Up In Entomology

Entomologists Alma Solis and Jason Hall specialize in moths and butterflies, respectively.
Marty Ittner Friends of Sligo Creek

Originally published on Sun September 23, 2012 5:16 pm

Alma Solis, a researcher at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Systematic Entomology Lab, and her husband, Jason Hall, a researcher with the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum, are, at first blush, a natural match.

Both are entomologists, a career that requires long hours, field work and travel for months at time — all without huge pay. But the couple soon learned that though they shared a passion, they did not share a specialty.

Hers: moths.

His: butterflies.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:33 pm
Sun September 23, 2012

'New Deal' Town Turns 75, Utopian Ideals Long Gone

A visiting rabbi teaches children. The majority of Jersey Homesteads came from the Bronx's Jewish community.
Russell Lee Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 12:29 pm

The town of Roosevelt, N.J., was born out of an era not much different from today. It was 1937, the economy was in the toilet, and the country bitterly divided.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt had won a second term in office — an election as acrimonious as today's — and with his re-election, a host of New Deal programs moved forward. One of these projects built 99 towns outside of industrial centers across the country. The town of Roosevelt, 50 miles south of New York City, was one of them.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:18 pm
Sun September 23, 2012

Vt. Town Hires Livestock To Save Money, Go Green

Charlotte, Vt., has a new, old-school strategy to keep cemetery grass cut: Let animals do the work.
Kirk Carapezza Vermont Public Radio

Originally published on Sun September 23, 2012 4:51 pm

Cities and towns facing tight budgets have often neglected their cemeteries, an oversight that has left many of them in disrepair with broken fencing, crumbling gravestones, overgrown grass and persistent weeds.

But this summer, the Vermont town of Charlotte implemented a new strategy to both save money and keep grass in the town's graveyards under control, and it's a decidedly traditional way of doing it: Let goats and sheep do the work.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:16 pm
Sun September 23, 2012

The Life And Times Of Movie Star 'Laura Lamont'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 1:05 pm

It's a small town girl's dream: One day, you're strutting the floorboards of a summer stage; the next, the silver screen. Thus is the arc of Elsa Emerson, a Door County, Wis., girl whose life at the Cheery County playhouse never quite goes away when she becomes the Oscar-winning Laura Lamont.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:23 am
Sun September 23, 2012

Giant Panda Cub Found Dead At National Zoo

Originally published on Sun September 23, 2012 2:11 pm

The giant panda cub born to much excitement at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C., last weekend was found dead this morning.

The Associated Press reports panda-keepers were alerted by sounds of distress from the cub's mother, Mei Xiang, but it was too late. The cause of death is not yet known, but zoo officials are planning a press conference at 1 p.m. ET.

Read more
Why Music Matters
11:03 am
Sun September 23, 2012

Scrolling Spaceways With Steely Dan And Shonen Knife

Mission specialist Stan Love's playlist for space includes David Bowie's "Space Oddity," XTC's "Another Satellite" and Shonen Knife's "Riding on the Rocket."
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 10:36 am

Weekends on All Things Considered continues its "Why Music Matters" series with music from the heavens, as chosen by astronaut Stan Love.

"In space, every day is an important day of work," Love says. But when he was sent up to the space station to drop off and pick up crew members, the returning station crew member asked, "Dudes, where are the tunes?"

Read more
The Two-Way
4:25 pm
Sat September 22, 2012

World Rhinocerous Day Pokes At A Serious Issue

Rhinos stand at a water hole in Mkomazi rhino sanctuary on in Mkomazi, Tanzania.
Chris Jackson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 12:39 pm

If you had a sudden urge to put a horn on your head, not use your knees and chew on some leaves, you may be catching the spirit of World Rhino Day. It's being celebrated all over the world with art shows, auctions, walk-a-thons and lectures with the theme of "Five Rhino Species Forever."

Read more
Arts & Life
3:54 pm
Sat September 22, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction Round 9 Still Open

A reminder from weekends on All Things Considered guest host Jacki Lyden that Round 9 of Three-Minute Fiction is still open for submissions. Our judge, Brad Meltzer, is looking for an original short story that revolves around a U.S. president — fictional or real — in under 600 words. Listeners can submit their story online at www.npr.org/threeminutefiction. The deadline for submissions is Sunday, September 23, at 11:59 p.m. ET.

Movies I've Seen A Million Times
2:21 pm
Sat September 22, 2012

The Movie Michael Peña Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Actor-writer-director Woody Allen on the set of his 1984 film, Broadway Danny Rose.
Brian Hamill Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 23, 2012 11:51 am

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actor Michael Peña, whose credits include Crash, World Trade Center, and End of Watch, which opened in theaters this weekend, the movie he could watch a million times is Woody Allen's Broadway Danny Rose.

Read more
Music Interviews
11:03 am
Sat September 22, 2012

Elliott Sharp: 'Blues Is A Feeling'

"Blues is a feeling, and it exists cross-culturally. It always has existed, and it always will. It's part of being human," says musician Elliott Sharp.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 2:36 pm

In the 1980s, Elliott Sharp was the height of New York City cool, a central part of that town's experimental music scene. His creations were inspired by advanced mathematical concepts. He tuned his guitars according to the Fibonacci Sequence and wrote challenging pieces inspired by fractal geometry.

Read more

Pages