Arts & Life

Arts & Life
3:58 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

With Headline Bus Tour, 'New York Post' Takes Manhattan

The New York Post is notorious for topping its stories of scandal and gossip with brazen and pun-laden headlines.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 11:06 am

One of the joys of living in New York City is laughing at the giant screaming headlines in the New York Post. When the former secretary of state knocked back a beer on one of her trips abroad: "Swillary." When the Lance Armstrong doping scandal broke: "Drug Pedaller." And when CIA director David Petraeus admitted having an affair? "Cloak And Shag Her."

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Arts & Life
3:38 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Statue Of Liberty Will Reopen July 4th, Says Parks Service

A sea shell rests on a wall surrounding the Statue of Liberty, in New York in November. Tourists in New York will miss out for a while on one of the hallmarks of a visit to New York, seeing the Statue of Liberty up close. Though the statue itself survived Superstorm Sandy intact, the storm damaged buildings and Liberty Island's power and heating systems.
Richard Drew AP

The National Park Service is almost finished with extensive repairs at the Statue of Liberty site and they expect to reopen it to the public by July 4th.

The damage was caused by Hurricane Sandy. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said in a statement that the hurricane damaged docks, the energy infrastructure on Ellis Island and crippled the security screening system.

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Arts & Life
2:48 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

WATCH: After 'Fascist' Accusations, Ukrainian Parliament Brawls

Ukrainian opposition and majority lawmakers fight around the rostrum during the session of parliament in Kiev, Ukraine, on Tuesday.
Sergei Chuzavkov AP

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 3:49 pm

You thought our politics were bad. If you need a fresh reminder that it could be worse: Official business at Ukraine's parliament was suspended for a short time, while MPs exchanged punches.

Russia Today has video:

And an explanation as to what caused the brawl:

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Arts & Life
2:44 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

'We Survived Iraq': An Iraqi Makes A New Home In North Carolina

Ali Hamdani was a doctor in Iraq before becoming a translator for NPR. He now lives in North Carolina.
Lourdes Garcia-Navarro NPR

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 6:51 pm

Ten years after the Iraq War began, NPR is catching up with people we encountered during the conflict. Back in 2008, NPR's armored car was targeted with a so-called sticky bomb in Baghdad. Ali Hamdani, an Iraqi who worked for NPR as a translator and producer, narrowly escaped. Shortly afterward, he left Iraq for the Unites States as a refugee.

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Author Interviews
1:26 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Veterans Face Red Tape Accessing Disability, Other Benefits

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 4:05 pm

Ten years ago, the United States invaded Iraq and began what the Bush administration said would be a short war.

But it wasn't until December 2011 that the United States officially ended its military mission there.

In addition to the tens of thousands of Iraqis who died, the war cost the lives of nearly 4,500 American service members, and wounded more than 32,200 men and women in America's military. Many of the wounded vets have faced — or are still facing — long waits for their disability and other benefits to begin.

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Arts & Life
12:53 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Malala, Pakistani Teen Shot For Demanding An Education, Heads To School In U.K.

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban, attends her first day of school on Tuesday just weeks after being released from the hospital.
Malala Press Office AP

Some terrific news today: Malala Yousafzai's story has come full circle. If you remember, the Pakistani teenager was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman because she was in favor of girls receiving an education.

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Arts & Life
12:20 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

How Master Chefs Keep France's Brightest Culinary Flames Alive

Serge Devesa, executive chef at New York's InterContinental Barclay Hotel, prepares bouillabaisse, a specialty from his hometown of Marseille, France. Devesa was just named a master chef by the Maître Cuisiniers de France.
Courtesy of InterContinental Barclay

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:08 pm

On the television show MasterChef, amateur chefs compete for a title and go on to open their own restaurants, or ink TV deals. That's the Hollywood version of the master chef, anyway.

But to earn the title in France, chefs must be inducted into the prestigious — and very exclusive — society called Maître Cuisiniers de France. It's more than 60-years-old, and it's one of the highest honors in the country.

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Music Reviews
12:17 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Justin Timberlake Returns To Music With Enthusiasm And 'Experience'

The 20/20 Experience is Justin Timberlake's first album since 2006.
Tom Monro RCA

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 9:03 am

The orchestral swirls, the transition to a soul-man groove, the falsetto croon — there you have some of the key elements to Justin Timberlake's album The 20/20 Experience. The title implies a certain clarity of vision, even as any given song presents the singer as a starry-eyed romantic, bedazzled by a woman upon whom he cannot heap enough compliments, come-ons and seductive playfulness.

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Arts & Life
12:08 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

House Across From Westboro Baptist Is Painted With Gay Pride Rainbow Colors

Planting Peace is painting the house across from the Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka with the colors of the gay pride rainbow.
Courtesy of Carol Hartsell Huffington Post

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 2:41 pm

Aaron Jackson took inspiration from a 9-year-old kid who stood up to Westboro Baptist Church protesters.

As Mark wrote last year, Josef Miles stood in front of protesters carrying signs that read "God Hates [Gays]" with his own sign that read "God Hates No One."

Today, Jackson is following through on a project that started about six months ago when he decided to buy a house across the street from the infamous church in Topeka, Kan.

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Arts & Life
12:00 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

An 'Absolute Will To Forget': Iraq Casts Shorter Shadow Than Vietnam

A soldier in the last American military convoy to depart Iraq, from the 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, waves after crossing over the border into Kuwait on Dec. 18, 2011.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 1:30 pm

Sometimes the whole country wants to forget.

Tuesday marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the war in Iraq. The last U.S. troops didn't leave that country until the end of 2011.

But Iraq, which dominated much of the nation's political discourse over the past decade, already seems largely forgotten.

"The Iraq War casts a shadow, but not a very large one," says Richard Kohn, a military historian at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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Books
11:12 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Hemon's 'The Book Of My Lives': Finding Beauty In Sarajevo's Scars

Aleksandar Hemon is also the author of Nowhere Man.
Velibor Bozovic Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 1:47 pm

The war in Bosnia left Sarajevo ruined by siege scars. Aleksandar Hemon describes in his new memoir how "the streets were fractured by mortar-shell marks — lines radiating from a little crater at the point of impact." But he notes that those holes were later "filled out with red paint" and that "the people of Sarajevo now, incredibly, called [them] 'roses.' "

The same could be said about the essays that make up The Book of My Lives, Hemon's first book of nonfiction, a collection of thorned, blood-red roses that make beauty out of his broken past.

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Arts & Life
10:56 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Can Arizona Demand Voters' Proof Of Citizenship?

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 11:29 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, the president of Xavier University of Louisiana has been on the job for 45 years now and he's guided the school through many storms, including Hurricane Katrina. Norman Francis will be with us in just a few minutes to share his wisdom about higher education and other issues. But first, a hot button issue we've been following had its day in the Supreme Court yesterday.

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Arts & Life
10:50 am
Tue March 19, 2013

How Does A Jewish Artist Tell The Ultimate Christian Story?

A coach and high school students work on Osvaldo Golijov's Passion According to St. Mark with the composer (right) in November 2012.
Chris Lee courtesy of Carnegie Hall

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 5:45 pm

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Arts & Life
10:48 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Music We Love Now: New Albums Of Bach, Beethoven And Brahms

Lisa Batiashvili plays the Stradivarius used to help birth Brahms' great Violin Concerto in D.
Anja Frers DG

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 9:04 am

New albums of music by the "Three Bs," Bach, Beethoven and Brahms, prove that going back to basics has its advantages. Hear a sweet-toned violin concerto, an audacious piano sonata and a solo cello suite caressed by a lute.

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Television
10:27 am
Tue March 19, 2013

A Measured Look At Roth As The Writer Turns 80

A new documentary about Philip Roth premieres on PBS next week as part of a slew of celebrations in honor of the novelist's 80th birthday.
PBS

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 1:11 pm

In Chinua Achebe's novel The Anthills of the Savannah, one of the characters says, "Poets don't give prescriptions. They give headaches."

The same is true of novelists, and none more so than Philip Roth. If any writer has ever enjoyed rattling people's skulls, it's this son of Newark, N.J., who's currently enjoying something of a victory lap in the media on the occasion of his 80th birthday. The celebration reaches its peak with a new documentary — Philip Roth Unmasked — that will screen on PBS next week as part of the American Masters series.

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