Arts & Life

The Salt
4:00 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

Forget Fish Fridays: In Louisiana, Gator Is On The Lenten Menu

Tastes like chicken, but it's OK for Lent: Fried alligator, as served at New Orleans' Cochon restaurant.
Chris Granger Courtesy of Cochon

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 4:59 pm

Is it OK to eat alligator on Fridays during Lent? That question isn't just rhetorical in Louisiana, which has large populations of both Catholics and gators.

"Alligator's such a natural for New Orleans," says Jay Nix, owner of Parkway Bakery, which serves a mean alligator sausage po boy sandwich. "Alligator gumbo, jambalaya. I mean, it's a wonder that alligator isn't our mascot, you know?"

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Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
4:00 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

How Ellen DeGeneres Helped Change The Conversation About Gays

Ellen DeGeneres during a taping of The Ellen DeGeneres Show in 2011 in Burbank, Calif.
Michael Rozman/Warner Bros. AP

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 4:59 pm

In 2008, during the brief window when it was legal for same-sex couples to get married in California, perhaps no couple drew more attention than Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi.

After their wedding, photos of the couple were everywhere; DeGeneres, beaming, in a white suit and holding hands with de Rossi, the very picture of the princess bride so many young girls dream of being one day. It was a cultural touchstone, and Dietram Scheufele, a communications professor at the University of Wisconsin, says it was neither the first nor the last time DeGeneres has played that role.

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Author Interviews
4:00 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

In A World That's Always On, We Are Trapped In The 'Present'

Erikona iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 4:59 pm

By now, you've probably heard people call themselves "slaves" to their phones or their computers. We all know what that means — but why are we allowing ourselves to be slaves to the very instruments of technology we've created?

Douglas Rushkoff, who spends his days thinking, writing and teaching about media culture, says it's time for people to stop chasing every ping and start using technology in a way that makes us feel more free. Rushkoff's latest work is called Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now. He joined NPR's Audie Cornish to talk about the book.

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The Salt
1:07 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The McCamembert

An awkward introduction.
NPR

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:36 pm

McDonald's in France is offering the McCamembert — a burger with Camembert cheese. Here's what one review had to say, once I ran it through Google Translate:

We, on the bottom rather than the goat!

Makes sense to me.

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NPR Story
1:02 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

'Mary T. and Lizzy K.': History's Unlikely Friendship

Sameerah Luqmaan-Harris plays Elizabeth Keckly and Naomi Jacobson plays Mary Todd Lincoln in Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater's production of Mary T. & Lizzy K.
Scott Suchman

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 4:03 pm

More than a century before Steven Spielberg's film Lincoln offered an intimate portrait of the 16th president and his family, a memoir from the first lady's dressmaker offered a glimpse into the Lincoln White House.

Elizabeth Keckley, Mary Todd Lincoln's seamstress and maybe her closest friend, told her story of slavery and self-emancipation, and her relationship with the Lincolns in a tell-all memoir called Behind The Scenes.

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Fresh Air Interviews
11:26 am
Mon March 25, 2013

How And Why The Hollywood Star Machine Made 'Gods Like Us'

promo image
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:25 pm

As a film critic for The Boston Globe, Ty Burr has met a lot of movie stars and is often asked what they're really like. What he has realized is that often, the actor's image has little to do with their actual personality, but that's not what interests him; Burr is more curious about why we ask that question to begin with. Burr wants to know "why we respond to these people who we think are larger than life [and] that are — especially in the classic days — manufactured and all their irregularities sanded off and presented to us as some kind of perfection."

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Fresh Air Interviews
11:25 am
Mon March 25, 2013

Remembering Chinua Achebe And The Importance Of Struggle

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 11:39 am

To remember Chinua Achebe who died last Thursday, Fresh Air listens back to an interview with the great African writer that originally aired on May 10, 1988. In it, Achebe talks about the literary trope of the white explorer or missionary living amongst the savages, and the importance of struggle.

Arts & Life
8:34 am
Mon March 25, 2013

Crossing On The Paris

Crossing On The Paris

“Crossing on the Paris: A Novel”
Author: Dana Gynther Publisher: Gallery Books, Simon & Schuster
Pages: 314
Price: $15.00 (Paper)

The date is June 15, 1921, Le Havre, France. Three women who have never met are captured by the ship’s photographer as they mount the gangplank for the maiden voyage of the French luxury liner “Paris.”

The “Ship of Fools” motif in fiction, most famously exploited in the novel by Katherine Anne Porter, is time honored and very useful.

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Highway Accidents
8:31 am
Mon March 25, 2013

590 Killed in 2 Alabama Counties

One person was killed when a truck loaded with lumber crossed the median and collided with another vehicle, January 18, 2008. The accident occured near Interstate 20/59 at Arkadelphia Road.
Joe Songer/Birmingham News

Accident data shows that speed and traffic volume raise the risk of fatal accidents, leading to identifiable pockets of higher crash rates when those elements combine.


Al.com reports (http://bit.ly/YLUVHn) that 537 fatal crashes in Jefferson and Shelby counties killed 590 people between 2007 and 2011.


Statistics show the number of fatal crashes trending upward toward the end of that period, though stronger laws intended to improve driver behavior could reverse the trend, analysts say.

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Toomer's Corner Oak Trees
7:52 am
Mon March 25, 2013

Auburn Plans Commemorative Items from Oaks

Auburn University plans to turn portions of poisoned oak trees into commemorative items. Auburn fans can roll the iconic oak trees for a final time at an A-Day ceremony on April 20.
Auburn University

Auburn University plans to turn portions of the poisoned oaks at Toomer's Corner into commemorative items.


The vice president of Auburn Alumni Affairs, Debbie Shaw, told al.com the items will be at numerous price points.


Fans can roll the trees for the final time at an A-Day ceremony on April 20. Shaw said the trees will be removed April 23. After that, Auburn will install three concrete poles with wires 3 to 4 inches apart for fans to roll while plans are made to renovate the corner.

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The Two-Way
6:16 am
Mon March 25, 2013

Book News: Willa Cather's Letters To Be Published Against Her Wishes

Pulitzer Prize-winning American author Willa Cather wrote such novels as My Antonia and O Pioneers!
Hulton Archive Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
6:03 am
Mon March 25, 2013

March 25-31: Freedom, Peace And Pilgrimages

Penguin Books

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 2:45 pm

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movies I've Seen A Million Times
4:01 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

The Movie Chris O'Dowd Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey in a scene from the 1987 movie Dirty Dancing.
Archive Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 8:41 am

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Author Interviews
4:01 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

For Toms River, An Imperfect Salvation

Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:03 pm

In 1953, the Swiss chemical company Ciba came to Toms River, N.J. By all accounts, the community was delighted to have it. The chemical plant for manufacturing textile dye brought jobs and tax revenue to the small town on the Jersey shore. The company invested in the town's hospital and donated land for a golf course.

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The Picture Show
8:34 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Drawing Artistic Inspiration From C-SPAN's Talking Heads

(Left to right) Sketches of Henry Kissinger, Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama
Courtesy of Michael McCutcheon

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 12:49 pm

A few months ago, Reid Cherlin, a GQ magazine contributor and former White House spokesman for President Obama, was sent a link to a website with what he says was "a sort of grotesque sketch" of his face.

It was the website of Michael McCutcheon, a 73-year-old retiree who draws sketches of all of the guests on C-SPAN's morning programming. Cherlin was a guest on C-SPAN last year, a pretty normal thing for D.C. pundits.

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