Arts & Life

Arts & Life
4:34 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

How Louisville Went From 'Little Brother' To Powerhouse

Louisville forward Chane Behanan celebrates after defeating Michigan in the NCAA basketball championship on Monday. It was the school's first basketball title since 1986.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 6:34 pm

University of Louisville fans have had a lot to cheer about lately — and not just basketball.

Monday's big victory by Louisville's men's basketball team over Michigan is just the latest success for the school and for an athletic department that is quickly becoming one of the country's most admired.

In January, the football team upset fourth-ranked Florida to win the Sugar Bowl, and coach Charlie Strong turned down a lucrative offer from the University of Tennessee to continue rebuilding the Louisville program.

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Arts & Life
4:14 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

Vermont Bests The Nation In Local Chow

A Vermont farm stand. The state excels at getting the produce to the people.
David Sucsy iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 6:00 pm

Sure, it's a tiny state, but Vermont is powerful when it comes to shopping at farmers markets, ordering up veggies from a CSA, and developing distribution systems for local products.

That's why the Green Mountain State topped the 2013 Strolling of the Heifers Locavore Index, a ranking of all 50 states and the District of Columbia based on their commitment to local food.

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Arts & Life
3:01 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

Brad Paisley Ventures Out Of Country's 'Wheelhouse'

Brad Paisley's new album is titled Wheelhouse.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 6:34 pm

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Arts & Life
2:51 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

Spring Storm Brings Snow To Colo., High Winds To Wyo., Dust Storm In Ariz.

A woman crosses the street as steam rises from a manhole cover in Denver's financial district on Tuesday.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 3:31 pm

We almost feel guilty writing this post, because here in Washington, we're finally seeing some spring (the cherry blossoms have reached full bloom!): But in the Plains, a spring storm is bringing snow to Colorado and Wyoming and whipped up enough winds to cover parts of Arizona in dust.

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Arts & Life
2:42 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

Brad Paisley's 'Accidental Racist' Sparks At Least One Dialogue

LL Cool J (left) and Brad Paisley backstage during the 48th Annual Academy Of Country Music Awards Sunday in Las Vegas.
Jerod Harris/ACMA2013 Getty Images for ACM

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 7:18 am

"It can't be a coincidence that 'Accidental Racist' came out the same day Code Switch launched," @Melanism tweeted at us on Monday.

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Sports
12:45 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

Being A 'Hot Poet' And A 'Hot Basketball Player

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 1:28 pm

In an essay for Sports Blog Nation, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Stephen Dunn reflects on his path from college basketball player to poet. "What basketball and poetry have in common," he writes, "is that they each provide opportunities to be better than yourself — opportunities for transcendence."

Remembrances
11:28 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Remembering Annette Funicello, America's Mouseketeer

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 1:05 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. We're going to remember Annette Funicello. She died yesterday at the age of 70 from complications of multiple sclerosis, which she had had for more than 25 years.

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Arts & Life
11:26 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Former Social Security Commish Writes Haiku

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally, the latest in our series Muses and Metaphors. We are celebrating National Poetry Month by hearing your poetic tweets. You've already started sending us poems that are 140 characters or less. Today, we hear from former Social Security Commissioner Michael Astrue. He joined us earlier in the program to talk about the president's proposal to change Social Security. But in addition to his government service - you might know this - Mr. Astrue is a published poet. And here he is.

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Movie Reviews
10:57 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Going 'Mental' And Enjoying The Ride

Shaz (Toni Collette), a hotheaded stranger new to the Australian town of Dolphin Heads, becomes the unlikely answer to a local politician's problems when she steps in to nanny his children.
Dada Films

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 1:39 pm

Mental is madder than madcap. I heard one critic sniff, "It's kind of broad" — and, Your Honor, the defense agrees! But if broad means "unsubtle," it doesn't have to mean "unreal." Mental makes most other movies seem boringly, misleadingly sane.

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Civil Rights Movement
10:30 am
Tue April 9, 2013

50 Years Since King’s Letter Recalls Spring Hill as Civil Rights Leader

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote his "Letter From a Birmingham Jail" after being arrested for violating a court order banning civil rights demonstrations.
baptistspirituality.wordpress.com

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Monkey See
10:26 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Let's Rush To Judgment: 'Carrie'

Sony Pictures

Carrie was Stephen King's first published novel. First released in 1974, it was followed in 1976 by Brian De Palma's film adaptation, for which both Sissy Spacek and Piper Laurie were nominated for Oscars.

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First Reads
9:14 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Exclusive First Read: 'Snapper,' By Brian Kimberling

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 10:11 am

Brian Kimberling's debut novel, Snapper, is a lovely, loose-limbed collection of stories about an aimless ornithologist named Nate, who as the book opens is possessed of a glitter-covered pickup truck and a massive (somewhat requited) crush on redheaded dream girl Lola. Nate and his friends wander toward marriage and maturity over the course of 13 linked stories — encountering angry snapping turtles, bald eagles and mystic mechanics along the way.

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Book Reviews
9:10 am
Tue April 9, 2013

From Wolitzer, Dramas Of The Gifted (And Less So)

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 9:42 am

Meg Wolitzer's fat, talky new novel begins in 1974 at an arts camp in the Berkshires where six teenagers sit around in a teepee smoking pot and discussing Gunter Grass. Yes, Gunter Grass, which gives you an idea of the kind of kids Wolitzer is writing about: smart, privileged, pretentious.

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Code Switch
7:46 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Mom Says: "Learn Chinese"

Hu, with her mom, Jeannie.
Channing Johnson Elise Hu

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 11:50 am

My earliest memory of code switching is at Pizza Hut, back when Pizza Huts were sit-down restaurants with salad bars and garlic bread. (Like any daughter of immigrants, most of my memories involve food.) My mom and dad would speak with the waiters in English, ordering our pan-crust pizzas and Pepsi products, but we used Mandarin at the table. Our Mandarin was our secret code.

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The Two-Way
6:14 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Book News: Margaret Thatcher Authorized A Posthumous Biography

Britain's then-Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher at the Tory Party Conference in Blackpool, England, in 1981.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:18 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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