Arts & Life

Arts & Life
7:31 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Phosphorescent
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:28 pm

Each month, we ask public radio DJs from across the country to share their favorite new songs. Usually, we stick to a handful, but since April is Public Radio Music Month, we're celebrating with a 10-spot.

  • Larry Groce, host of NPR's Mountain Stage, which is produced by West Virginia Public Broadcasting
  • Rita Houston, the program director at WFUV in New York City
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Arts & Life
6:34 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Meat recall involves Alabama retailers

istockphoto

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The U.S. Department of Agriculture says a Louisiana-based meat packing company has expanded a recall of meat products because of possible bacterial contamination. No illnesses have been reported

The Manda Packing Company recall announced this past week now includes 468,000 pounds of roast beef, ham, turkey breast, tasso pork, ham shanks, hog headcheese, corned beef, and pastrami.

The agriculture department said Friday the products were recalled because of possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

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You Must Read This
6:03 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Dreaming Of Justice: Hardscrabble Lives In Hallucinatory Prose

Alex Espinoza is the author of The Five Acts of Diego León.

Before becoming a novelist and educator, I was a manager at a shop in Santa Monica, Calif., selling sofas and custom-framed art to movie stars and wealthy Angelinos. Eventually I grew frustrated and, determined to reinvent myself as a writer, I quit and went back to school.

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Poetry
5:47 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Harmony Holiday On Finding Poetry In Her Biracial Roots

Harmony Holiday is a poet who lives in New York.
Courtesy Harmony Holiday

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:04 am

In celebration of National Poetry Month, Weekend Edition is hearing from young poets about what poetry means to them. This week, they spoke with Harmony Holiday, a New York poet and dance choreographer who's spending this month archiving audio of overlooked and often misunderstood poetry for The Beautiful Voices Project.


Interview Highlights

On why she first started writing poetry

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Author Interviews
5:47 am
Sun April 14, 2013

After Tragedy, Young Girl Shipped West On 'Orphan Train'

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:04 am

Christina Baker Kline's new novel, Orphan Train, is partially set in 1929, mere months before the stock market crash that would trigger the Great Depression. A young Irish girl, Niamh (pronounced "Neeve"), has just lost her entire family after a fire ripped through their tenement building. She is turned over to authorities who put her on a train bound for the Midwest. The train is filled with dozens of other children who have lost their families in one way or another; they are now hoping that their journey will connect them with new parents and a new, better life.

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Arts & Life
4:09 am
Sun April 14, 2013

In Hazleton, A Mixed Welcome For City's Immigrants

Roads End bar on Broad Street in Hazleton, Pa., displays a sign in 2007 that reads "ALL Legals Served." Longtime residents of the city are divided over the recent influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 5:33 pm

Many residents say Hazleton, Pa., continues life now as a divided city. While some Spanish-speakers build new lives, longtime residents remain split on how the influx has changed their home.

It's not hard to find a Latino business in Hazleton these days, including law firms, insurance agencies and even a migrant education program. Amilcar Arroyo, the publisher of a local Spanish-language newspaper, says Latinos are now firmly establishing themselves as a part of the city.

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Arts & Life
3:58 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Jazz In The Cafeteria: Kids Learn To Listen While They Chomp

Saxophonist Harold Rapp plays during lunchtime at Alice Terry Elementary School in Sheridan, Colo.
Jenny Brundin for NPR

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 5:44 pm

School lunch is often synonymous with loud noise. Studies have shown the decibel level in some cafeterias is as high as a lawn mower.

Every so often, though, students at Alice Terry Elementary School, southwest of Denver, are asked not to make any noise.

When the music teacher told students here they'd occasionally have a "silent" lunch break, this was kindergartner Alyssa Norquette's reaction: "Why do we need a silent lunch? Is it because we're too loud or something?"

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Sunday Puzzle
3:53 am
Sun April 14, 2013

O Say Can You C The Answer?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:04 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a two-word phrase in which the first word starts with O. Drop the O, and you'll get a new word that ends the phrase.

Last week's challenge: Name something in nine letters that is commonly read on Sunday morning. If you have the right thing, you can rearrange all the letters to name a bygone car model that you still see on the road today. What are they?

Answer: Scripture; PT Cruiser

Winner: Pam Smith of Beaverton, Ore.

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Arts & Life
5:27 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

Thao Nguyen's Musical Life Is Far From 'Common'

Thao & The Get Down Stay Down's new album is titled We The Common.
Nick Walker Courtesy of the artist

Thao Nguyen, of the folk-rock group Thao & the Get Down Stay Down, has been on a musical journey since she started performing in her teens in Northern Virginia. Delicate yet fierce in her vocal delivery, she writes often about her social concerns — and it was a trip to a California women's prison that inspired much of her latest album, We the Common.

Ngyuen and her band are on the road for the first time in several years; she spoke with NPR's Jacki Lyden from a tour stop in Kansas City.

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Movies
4:43 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

Jurassic Bark: How Sound Design Changed Our Imaginations

A single trumpet from a baby elephant at the San Francisco Zoo was used for every single T. Rex roar in Jurassic Park.
Universal Pictures

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 7:15 pm

Nobody actually knows what dinosaurs sound like. But if you can imagine the roar of a T. Rex or the bellow of a brachiosaurus, it's probably thanks to the 1993 blockbuster Jurassic Park, which turns 20 this summer.

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Dance
4:02 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

'First American Ballet Star' Soared To Fame With 'Firebird'

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 5:09 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

The dancer who brought "Firebird" and "The Nutcracker" to life at the New York City Ballet died this week. Maria Tallchief was one of America's great prima ballerinas. NPR's Joel Rose has this remembrance.

JOEL ROSE, BYLINE: Maria Tallchief soared to fame in 1949 when she danced the lead role in Stravinsky's "Firebird" in a production choreographed by George Balanchine.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

MARIA TALLCHIEF: He was a poet. And he taught us how to react and to become this poetry.

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Theater
4:02 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

A 'Caesar' With An African Accent

Patterson Joseph plays Brutus, the friend whose betrayal wounds Caesar most — and whose suicide caps off the play's second act.
Richard Termine BAM

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 5:09 pm

The 400-year-old plays of William Shakespeare are constantly being reinterpreted and re-envisioned for new generations. Recently, England's Royal Shakespeare Company produced a Julius Caesar set in contemporary Africa that was a hit at the World Shakespeare Festival, presented in conjunction with the London Olympics. Now the RSC has brought it to America.

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Pets
8:45 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Tax Deductions for Pets

Are you sure I am not deductible?
Credit KNorton

Most folks know that expenses related to the care and well-being of a pet are not deductible on an individual's income tax return.  Or are they? 

********************************

With the deadline coming up for filing personal income tax returns, a lot of us are looking for deductions wherever we can find them.

More than one pet owner has thought about deducting a few extra medical expenses for those veterinary bills last year. After all, the vet is a “doctor” and your pet is a member of the family – a dependent, really, in the truest sense of the word.

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Arts & Life
8:35 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Auburn University approves tuition hike

Auburn University

AUBURN, Ala. (AP) — The Auburn University Board of Trustees has voted unanimously to approve a tuition hike. The board voted Friday to raise tuition by an average of about 4.5 percent and 8 percent at its sister school Auburn University Montgomery. Officials say record reductions in state funding and rising mandatory costs factored into the decision to increase tuition. University officials expect the tuition hike to translate to a $6 million increase in revenue and $2.4 million increase in revenue at Auburn University Montgomery next fiscal year.

Author Interviews
5:17 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Dante's Beauty Rendered In English In A Divine 'Comedy'

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 9:11 am

The Divine Comedy is a 14th century poem that has never lost its edge. Dante Alighieri's great work tells the tale of the author's trail through hell — each and every circle of it — purgatory and heaven. It has become perhaps the world's most cited allegorical epic about life, death, goodness, evil, damnation and reward. It calls upon the reader to ask: What would be our personal hell? What, for us, would really be paradise?

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