Arts & Life

Remembrances
10:48 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Former 'Ebony' Editor Was Proud German

Tell Me More remembers Ebony Magazine's former managing editor, Hans Massaquoi. He arrived in America as an outsider, after growing up black in Nazi Germany. Host Michel Martin speaks with his former colleague, Lynn Norment about his career and legacy.

The Salt
10:27 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Still Life With Cheeseburger: Art That Looks Good Enough To Eat

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 12:22 pm

Back in the day – the 17th century – Vermeer, Rembrandt and the rest of the Dutch Golden Age crew blazed a trail for realism in art. Their work wasn't just technically dazzling; it was also distinctive. Instead of fat baby cherubs and saints, they painted the stuff of every day life. Often, that meant food.

In their hands, grapes popped with juiciness. Lobsters steamed, ready for cracking. Milk practically splashed the viewer as it poured from the jug.

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Arts & Life
9:52 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Classical Crib Sheet: Top 5 Stories This Week

Anne Akiko Meyers, holding the "Vieuxtemps" Guarneri del Gesu violin, which reportedly sold for a record price. She says the anonymous buyer has offered her use of the instrument for life.
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 2:20 pm

  • Anne Akiko Meyers — the violinist who made news a year ago for an album recorded on her two Stradivarius instruments, including the then record price-breaking "Molitor" Strad, which she purchased for $3.6 million — announced yesterday that she's been given lifetime use of the 1741 "Vieuxtemps" Guarne
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Monkey See
9:41 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Nerd Culture And The Return Of Regrettable TV

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

We were all struck last week by Noel Murray's A.V. Club piece "The changing face of 'nerds' (and autism) in popular culture," so we spent this week's first segment talking about the separate but related matters it raises of how popular culture deals with nerds and how it deals with autism, not to mention how it deals with the messy and imprecise crossover between the two.

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Arts & Life
7:33 am
Fri January 25, 2013

NWS Cancels Winter Weather Advisory for North Ala

A snapshot of the National Weather Service forecast for North Alabama.
srh.noaa.gov

Forecasters say the threat of freezing rain is over for most of north Alabama.


Temperatures are well above freezing in the Tennessee Valley, and the National Weather Service has canceled a freezing rain advisory for the region.


Forecasters say light coatings of ice are still possible in the east Alabama counties of Cherokee and Cleburne along the Georgia line. But any problems should be gone by mid-morning Friday.


Dozens of schools delayed opening as a precaution against slippery roads.

Television
1:46 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Lives Of Praise, Lives In Progress On 'The Sisterhood'

The new TLC show The Sisterhood follows the lives of five preachers' wives in Atlanta.
TLC

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 8:14 am

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Arts & Life
9:03 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

After Years Of Estrangement, Eight Siblings Become A Family

Bryan Wilmoth (right) reunited with his brother Michael years after their parents kicked Bryan out for being gay. All six of their siblings either ran away or were kicked out of their family's home over the years.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 8:14 am

When Bryan Wilmoth was in his late teens, his father found a love letter from a man in Bryan's box of things.

Furious at the discovery of a gay son, Bryan's father took him for a ride and dropped him off in the middle of the night with a $5 bill.

"That's sort of all I remember — sleeping outside in the country that night," Bryan, 50, recounts to his brother Michael, at StoryCorps in Los Angeles.

Growing up in a strict, religious household, Bryan and his seven younger siblings all became estranged from their parents over the years.

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Arts & Life
4:59 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Manti Te'o: 'What I Went Through Was Real'

Manti T'eo.
Jonathan Daniel Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:16 am

In his first TV interview, Manti Te'o told Katie Couric Thursday that what he "went through was real."

The Notre Dame linebacker, whose athleticism and tragic personal story buoyed him to stardom, has been in the spotlight ever since DeadSpin revealed part of that amazing story wasn't real.

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Movie Reviews
4:57 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

'Yossi': Out In Israel, And That's Just Fine

After his lover dies in a military exercise, a devastated Yosssi (Ohad Knoller) must move from grief and shame into acceptance of his homosexuality.
Strand Releasing

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:18 am

In the decade since Israeli director Eytan Fox made Yossi & Jagger, the precursor to his sublimely tender new drama Yossi, Israel has undergone two significant changes. A tacit and active homophobia has given way, at least in the open cultural climate of Tel Aviv, to a matter-of-fact acceptance of gay rights. At the same time, Israeli cinema has bloomed, becoming a thriving international presence in just about every genre.

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Arts & Life
4:08 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

American Sentenced To 35 Years For Role In Mumbai Attack

David Coleman Headley, whose scouting missions were central to the 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai, was sentenced to 35 years in prison today.

According to the AP, one American woman injured during the attacks that killed 160 people testified that because of Coleman, she knew the "sound of life leaving a 13-year-old child."

"I don't have any faith in Mr. Headley when he says he's a changed person and believes in the American way of life," US District Judge Harry Leinenweber said before handing down the sentence.

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Arts & Life
4:06 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Two Decades On, Vusi Mahlasela Still Sings 'To The People'

Vusi Mahlasela's new album, a live recording of his 20th-anniversary show in Johannesburg, is titled Sing to the People.
Erik Forster Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 6:36 pm

South African singer-songwriter Vusi Mahlasela came of age during the 1970s, an era dominated by the violent student uprising in Soweto. From the start, his musical expression has been about love and hope for his country. His songs play as anthems of South Africa's rise from apartheid to democracy and have helped earn him the nickname "The Voice."

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Monkey See
4:06 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Home Video Review: 'Buster Keaton: The Ultimate Collection'

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Buster Keaton, aka "The Great Stone Face," brought side-splitting comedy to the silent-screen era. Here, he's pictured in 1924's The Navigator.
Kino Lorber

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 4:44 pm

Time now for a home-viewing recommendation from NPR movie critic Bob Mondello. A quiet recommendation — because Bob is touting the Ultimate Buster Keaton Collection, a 14-disc set of classic silent comedies.

Silent film had three great clowns. Charlie Chaplin's Little Tramp is the one everyone remembers; all-American daredevil Harold Lloyd is the one who made the most money; and Buster Keaton was the genius.

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Movie Interviews
4:06 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Filmmaker Holds Up 'A Mirror' In Interviews With Israel's 'Gatekeepers'

The interviews that form the core of The Gatekeepers began with a connection to Ami Ayalon, who was the head of Shin Bet from 1996 to 2000.
Avner Shahaf Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 2:36 pm

The Gatekeepers is an Israeli documentary based on long interviews with the six surviving heads of the Shin Bet — that's Israel's domestic security service. These six "gatekeepers" were in charge for more than 30 years.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

A Political 'Knife Fight' With All The Edge Of A Spork

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Political consultant Paul Turner (Rob Lowe) may be "the master of disaster," but the campaign satire Knife Fight doesn't give him much of an edge.
IFC Films

Framed for television and photographed in faded panels of astonishing blahness, Knife Fight is a dull political dramedy that ping-pongs between caustic misanthropy and soapy sentiment. Playing like a mashup of tropes from far superior small- and large-screen entertainments (Scandal, House of Lies, Ides of March), this clunky feature from Bill Guttentag is satire at its most soft-bellied and toadying.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

The Hard-Earned Liberty Of 'Happy People'

The simple, rough-edged lives of the Russian villagers in Werner Herzog's documentary Happy People: A Year in the Taiga make for a rhythmic study of ancient natural harmonies.
Music Box Films

It's midway through Burden of Dreams, the superb documentary about the making of his glorious 1982 fiasco Fitzcarraldo, and iconoclastic director Werner Herzog has had enough.

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