Arts & Life

Author Interviews
4:22 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Why You Should Give A $*%! About Words That Offend

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 7:41 am

If you said the "s" word in the ninth century, you probably wouldn't have shocked or offended anyone. Back then, the "s" word was just the everyday word that was used to refer to excrement. That's one of many surprising, foul-mouthed facts Melissa Mohr reveals in her new book, Holy S- - -: A Brief History of Swearing.

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Author Interviews
2:00 am
Mon May 13, 2013

After Leaving Senate, Snowe Is Still 'Fighting For Common Ground'

A Republican from Maine, Olympia Snowe served as a U.S. Senator from 1995 to 2013. Above, she speaks at a news conference in South Portland, Maine, in March 2012.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 8:18 am

As a Republican senator from Maine, Olympia Snowe was known for her willingness to stand alone. A moderate with independent views, she had substantial influence in the health care debate as both sides vied for her vote. Earlier this year she left the Senate, out of frustration, she says, with the inability to get anything done.

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Book Reviews
12:00 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Opening the Doors by B. J. Hollars

“Opening the Doors: The Desegregation of the University of Alabama and the Fight for Civil Rights in Tuscaloosa”
Author: B.J. Hollars
Publisher: The University of Alabama Press
Pages: 288
Price: $29.95 (Cloth)

Alabama Governor George Wallace’s infamous stand in the schoolhouse door took place on June 11, 1963, at Foster Auditorium, nearly fifty years ago.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
2:49 pm
Sun May 12, 2013

The Movie Mark McKinney Has 'Seen A Million Times'

A scene from Hayao Miyazaki's 1988 film, My Neighbor Totoro.
The Kobal Collection Tokuma Enterprises

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 5:51 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Author Interviews
2:40 pm
Sun May 12, 2013

After Long Wait, Novelist James Salter Shares 'All That Is'

Todd Webb Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 5:51 pm

On the list of great postwar American male novelists — along with Philip Roth, Norman Mailer and John Updike — is James Salter.

With the publication of his first book in 1957, he won the admiration of writers and critics alike. But after 1979, his production slowed. Salter still wrote — essays, short stories, poetry — but nothing on a grander scale.

Now, that long-awaited novel has been published. All That Is sets out to give a sweeping portrait of human experience.

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The Two-Way
2:05 pm
Sun May 12, 2013

Banksy Mural May Be Coming To U.S. After All

A man inspects a plastic cover placed over Slave Labour, an artwork attributed to Banksy, in London. This piece of art was put up for sale in Miami last February, but the ensuing outrage led to the auction's cancellation. The mural is now part of an exhibition in London, and is is expected to move to the U.S. afterward.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 5:00 am

You might remember the story of the uproar earlier this year over a piece of art by the mysterious graffiti artist Banksy that disappeared from its home on a wall in north London and ended up on the auction block in Miami.

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Author Interviews
4:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Chasing A Dream, Speeding Down 'The Emerald Mile'

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 7:03 am

Host Rachel Martin talks to writer Kevin Fedarko about his new book, The Emerald Mile, which tells the harrowing story of three men who ride the flooded Colorado River through the Grand Canyon.

Sunday Puzzle
4:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

This One Is For You, Ma

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 5:55 am

On-air challenge: You are given two words starting with M-A. The answer is a third word that can follow the first one and precede the second one, in each case to complete a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase.

Last week's challenge: Name a famous performer whose last name has six letters. Move the first three letters to the end — without otherwise changing the order of the letters — and add one more letter at the end. The result, in seven letters, will name a place where this person famously performed. Who is it, and what's the place?

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Digital Life
4:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

He Didn't Just Call His Mother, He Made Her A Star

In My Mom on Movies filmmaker Joshua Seftel talks with his mom, Pat, about movies, pop culture and life by webcam.
Courtesy of Phillip Toledano

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 12:25 pm

A little over three years ago, filmmaker Josh Seftel's father passed away. After that, he says, it became difficult to keep up with his mom. He didn't use the phone very often and she didn't like email.

But then he got an idea.

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Author Interviews
4:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

A 'Cooked Seed' Sprouts After All, In America

Cover of The Cooked Seed

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 1:16 pm

Anchee Min's best-selling memoir Red Azalea told the story of her youth in China during the Cultural Revolution. Her followup, The Cooked Seed, picks up nearly 20 years later as she arrives in America with $500 in her pocket, no English and a plan to study art in Chicago.

Min tells NPR's Rachel Martin that her life in China ended because of her relationship with Madame Mao, a former actress and the wife of Chairman Mao Zedong.

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Author Interviews
3:54 pm
Sat May 11, 2013

The 'Curious' Story Of Robert 'Believe It Or Not!' Ripley

Robert Ripley traveled the world collecting souvenirs like this Balinese lion mask.
Courtesy Ripley Entertainment

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 5:26 pm

Before there was YouTube or Mythbusters or The Amazing Race, there was Robert "Believe It or Not!" Ripley.

Ripley's pioneering mix of the strange, the shocking and the barely believable grabbed Americans' attention and grew his newspaper cartoon into a media empire.

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Pets
8:45 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Happy (?) Mother's Day

Mama and Her Litter of Pups
Credit tikicat90 (Rachel Larson)

Being kind to animals is more than just an idea.  It's a way of treating them with respect and encouraging others to do the same.  That would include making sure that our own pets are spayed or neutered to help prevent the problem of pet overpopulation.

**************************************

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Arts & Life
6:47 am
Sat May 11, 2013

FBI Team honored for rescuing kidnapped Alabama boy

FBI

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — FBI Special Agent in Charge Stephen Richardson and his team have been named as finalists for the 2013 Heyman Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Medal. They are being honored for their role in the rescue of a 5-year-old south Alabama boy who was abducted at gunpoint earlier this year. The boy, who was held in an underground bunker for six days, was rescued safely. His captor, Jimmy Lee Dykes, was killed. Richardson oversaw a FBI team that included crisis negotiators, tactical units, bomb experts, behavioral scientists and surveillance units.

Author Interviews
4:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

A Nigerian-'Americanah' Novel About Love, Race And Hair

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is a Nigerian-born author and MacArthur fellow. Her earlier works include the novels Purple Hibiscus and Half of a Yellow Sun and the short story collection The Thing Around Your Neck.
Ivara Esege Random House

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:22 pm

School romances face a lot of obstacles: the big decision at graduation, the competing demands of two burgeoning careers, perhaps a period spent in a long-distance relationship. But the young lovers in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's latest novel, Americanah, must overcome even more challenges than usual: military rule, immigration restrictions and, during their years apart, other relationships.

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Monkey See
4:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Christopher Guest Comes To HBO With A 'Family' Comedy That's Serious

Chris O'Dowd (left) stars in Family Tree, a new HBO show from Christopher Guest (right) and Jim Piddock.
Suzanne Tenner HBO

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 9:11 am

Christopher Guest has made so many people laugh since he started making mock documentaries with This Is Spinal Tap in 1984 that his fans might be surprised to hear his response to Scott Simon's question on Saturday's Weekend Edition about whether he ever thinks about making a serious movie.

Referencing Family Tree, his new show for HBO starring Chris O'Dowd as a man discovering his roots, Guest says that even with comedy, the emotional content can still be critical.

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