Arts & Life

Book Reviews
6:03 am
Sun July 27, 2014

A Foodie Detective Solves Crime In A Delectable Italian Mystery

Angelica's Smile cover art.

The Inspector Montalbano books, by Italian author Andrea Camilleri, supply everything I need for the beach. A good mystery. An exotic location — in this case, the beaches and piazzas of Sicily. And great writing that wears its fineness lightly, and keeps the pages turning. All with the most charming fuss-bucket of a detective to come along since Hercule Poirot: Inspector Salvo Montalbano.

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Movie Interviews
4:24 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Director Says Hoffman Inhabited 'Most Wanted Man' Role

Anton Corbijn directed Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his final roles — playing a haggard German intelligence agent in the film adaptation of the John le Carré spy thriller A Most Wanted Man.
Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 6:29 pm

When actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died of a heroin overdose in February, he left behind several unreleased films.

His most significant role: The haggard German intelligence agent Gunther Bachmann in the spy thriller A Most Wanted Man. Hoffman's character leads a fictional intelligence unit and is tasked with recruiting informants within the Islamic community to uncover terrorist plots.

The film is based on the 2008 John le Carré novel by the same name. It's set in Hamburg, Germany, more than 10 years after Sept. 11.

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My Big Break
4:23 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

An Idea That Stuck: How A Hymnal Bookmark Helped Inspire The Post-It Note

3M employee Art Fry had a problem: When he sang with his church choir, his paper bookmarks were forever falling out of his hymnal. Thankfully for Fry, his coworker Spencer Silver had a new adhesive in the works.
Courtesy of 3M

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 6:29 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

For Spencer Silver, a retired chemist at 3M, his big break was the Post-it Note.

It all started when he stumbled on a new type of adhesive that used tiny microspheres.

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Author Interviews
4:11 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Lessons In 'Essentialism': Getting More Out Of Life By Doing Less

Odin M. Eidskrem iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 6:29 pm

Greg McKeown doesn't believe in having it all or doing it all. In his new book Essentialism, he argues that we should pursue only those things that are truly important — and eliminate everything else.

"In the bigger picture essentialism is about fighting this nonsense that we have been sold ... that if we can fit it all in then we can have it all," he tells NPR's Eric Westervelt.

McKeown provides advice and real-life examples from people who revised their do-it-all approach. He says you don't have to say yes to everything in order to be successful.

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Code Switch
4:11 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Hoping To Reach A Wider Audience, Lifetime Breaks Out Of Familiar Formula

On Wednesday, Lifetime premiered BAPs, a reality show that follows "an exclusive, privileged and affluent group of African American friends from St. Louis who self-identify as 'BAPs' — Black American Princesses and Princes."
Richard Knapp

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 6:29 pm

TV viewers have come to expect a certain formula from Lifetime shows — stories of desperate women, sudden teen pregnancy, or sentimental romance — starring women who are, for the most part, white. But on Wednesday, Lifetime added something different to their lineup with the premiere of a new "docu-series" called BAPs. BAPs stands for Black American Prince or Princess. The reality show follows a group of young, wealthy African Americans in St. Louis through dinner parties and shouting matches.

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History
9:33 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Lover's Letters To President Harding Pushed German Cause

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 12:32 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Arts & Life
9:20 am
Sat July 26, 2014

The Battle of Mobile Bay-- "Resaca"

Pat Duggins

Alabama Public Radio is looking back on the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Battle of Mobile Bay. It was on August 5, 1864 when the engagement helped to both seal the fate of the Confederacy, and put Abraham Lincoln into a second term in office. The APR news team is examining Alabama’s role in the Civil War in 1864. For some, the conflict has turned into an expensive hobby that can get pretty loud…

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Strange News
9:15 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Dressing Up As A T-Rex Is All Part Of The Job

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 12:32 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Pets
8:45 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Retired Military Dogs Go To Washington

Military Dogs Go to Washington, DC
Credit American Humane Association [Facebook]

When American service men and women finish their tours of duty overseas they return home, often to a hero's welcome.  For their canine comrades on the front lines, it's a different story. 

********************** 

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Commentary
7:40 am
Sat July 26, 2014

We Can Be Heroes — With Some Glue And A Little Fabric

Twelve-year-old Hayley Lindsay spent almost a month working with her dad on this Toothless the Dragon costume. There are sawn-off crutches in the front legs so she can comfortably walk on all fours.
Petra Mayer

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 12:32 pm

The San Diego Comic-Con is in full swing — celebrating not just comics, but movies, TV, books, video games and really cool costumes. It's called cosplay: the art and science of dressing up like your favorite character.

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NPR Story
7:35 am
Sat July 26, 2014

'Back Channel' Turns Up White House Intrigue

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 12:32 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. When Stephen Carter's new novel opens, President Kennedy is alone in a bedroom with the beautiful intern. Did I say this was a novel? We'll let Professor Carter pick up his narrative.

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Author Interviews
7:35 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Plot To Poison Famed French Wine Makes For Gripping (Pinot) Noir

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 12:32 pm

Romanée-Conti — a legendary French vineyard — produces one of the most elegant and extravagantly-priced wines in the world. In January 2010, proprietor Aubert de Villaine received a threat to his livelihood, if not his life: Pay more than 1 million euros in ransom, or his Burgundy vines would be poisoned.

Maximillian Potter first wrote about this plot for Vanity Fair and has now authored a book called Shadows in the Vineyard: The True Story of the Plot to Poison the World's Greatest Wine.

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Movies
7:34 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Silent Film Fans Make Some Noise To Help ID Forgotten Treasures

The Library of Congress started their Mostly Lost workshop to help identify films from its archives. The event also includes presentations from early film experts like Serge Bromberg, who this year recreated the stage performance that was part of the 1914 animated film Gertie the Dinosaur.
Bill Dragga Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 1:06 pm

Deep in the archives of the Library of Congress' Culpeper, Va., film preservation center lie thousands of movies in cool, climate-controlled vaults. Hundreds are a century old or older, and unidentified. Their titles have been lost over the years and the library knows little about them, so it started inviting fans of early film to a yearly event called Mostly Lost to help figure out what they are.

And you know what? Those fans are rowdy.

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Code Switch
5:34 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Dueling Markets Show Native American Art Is Big Business

An estimated 175,000 people travel to New Mexico in August to view Native American art.
Larry Lamsa Flickr

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 2:26 pm

The 93rd annual Santa Fe Indian Market is only a month away. It's the biggest and best-known destination for Native artists and Native art collectors on the planet, and this year, it's got competition — a new event called the Indigenous Fine Arts Market.

Native American art and culture is big business. If you don't believe that, look no further than the controversial or illegal sides of the market. If you've been paying attention over the last year, you've seen some lurid and fascinating headlines:

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:12 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Not My Job: We Ask A San Francisco Drag Queen About Queens, N.Y.

Jose Guzman Colon Courtesy Peaches Christ

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 11:06 am

Behind all the nerd billionaires and trendy restaurants in today's San Francisco, there is another city, where the most interesting people aren't wearing hoodies — they're wearing spike heels, glitter catsuits and fantastic hair.

We've invited Peaches Christ, Queen of San Francisco Drag Queens, to play a game called "Fuggedaboutit!" Three questions for a drag queen about Queens — that borough of New York City destined to be the next hipster capital now that Brooklyn is old news.

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