Arts & Life

Around the Nation
4:02 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

By Dimming Its Lights, Museum Opens Doors For Kids With Autism

One Saturday each month, the Pacific Science Center of Seattle opens early for people with autism spectrum disorders.
John Keatley Pacific Science Center

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:18 am

On a Saturday at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Wash., life-size robotic dinosaurs roar. A giant video monitor shows a person sneezing as a spray of mist shoots down from the ceiling. Nearby, naked mole rats scurry blindly through a maze of tunnels.

And since it's all mud and rain outside, the place is packed with curious children and adults trying to keep up with them.

Loud noises, bright lights, crowded spaces: This is exactly the situation Mike Hiner tries to avoid with his 20-year-old son Steven, who is autistic.

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Author Interviews
4:02 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

Huckabee Serves Up 'God, Guns' And A Dose Of Controversy

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee was a Republican presidential hopeful in the 2008 election. He writes that he wants his book God, Guns, Grits, and Gravy to introduce Americans to life in "flyover country."
Justin Sullivan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 9:41 pm

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee is currently considering jumping into the race for the Republican presidential nomination. But if you're looking for a clear sign of his intentions, you won't find it in his new book, God, Guns, Grits, and Gravy.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
10:26 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Not My Job: We Quiz Funk Legend George Clinton On The British Parliament

Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 12:42 am

George Clinton, the founding father of funk, is the creator of the bands Parliament and Funkadelic. We'll ask him three questions about another kind of parliament — namely, the British Parliament.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

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Arts & Life
8:53 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Alabama Seeks Stay After Judge Overrules Same-Sex marriage ban

Attorney General Luther Strange wasted no time in seeking to stay yesterday's court decision overruling Alabama's ban on same sex marriage. Strange is asking a federal judge to stay a ruling that ended the law against gay marriage. Meanwhile, advocates are cheering what once seemed an improbable victory in the deeply conservative state. Luther Strange's office asked a federal judge on Friday to put the ruling on hold since the U.S. Supreme Court plans to take up the issue. U.S. District Callie V.S.

Pets
8:45 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Arthritis in Pets

There may be gray on my face but there is play in my heart.
Credit jumpinjimmyjava (Jimmy Brown {Flickr]

As our pets age, they may have to deal with some of the same infirmities that we humans face as we grow older.  Just because the body may not move as fast or as easily as before, your furry companion is still your best friend!

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Author Interviews
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Why A Black Man's Murder Often Goes Unpunished In Los Angeles

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:15 am

In the State of the Union this week, President Obama noted that crime in America is down. "For the first time in 40 years," he said, "the crime rate and the incarceration rate have come down together."

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Author Interviews
6:59 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Two Outcasts Form An Artistic Bond In 'Mr. Mac And Me'

Esther Freud is the author of Hideous Kinky, The Sea House, and other novels.
Courtesy of Bloomsbury Publishing

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 10:49 am

Thomas Maggs is a lonely little boy. When Esther Freud's new novel Mr. Mac And Me opens, he is 13 years old. His brothers have died, his father, who runs a bar, drinks too much of his own stock and beats his son. Thomas dreams of sailing away – and then World War I descends on his small English sea coast town. Tours stop coming, blackout curtains go up, village boys enlist and go off to war.

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Code Switch
6:56 am
Sat January 24, 2015

A Japanese Singing Competition Blooms In Colorado

Two performers rehearse a traditional Japanese dance for Denver's 2015 Kohaku Uta Gassen.
Chloe Veltman KCFR

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:00 am

At a Buddhist temple in downtown Denver, Junko Higdon is rehearsing a traditional song for one of the local Japanese community's biggest annual events.

Higdon is one of 30 amateur singers competing in two teams at this year's Kohaku Uta Gassen, which means, "red and white singing battle."

"White is for the men, red is for the women and whoever gets the most points out the teams wins the trophy," she says.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Do You Have To Read 'Frog'? No, But You Might Want To

Mo Yan won the Nobel Prize for literature in 2012.
Yin Li

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 10:35 am

There are books you read because you want to read them and there are books you read because you have to read them. The former category can include anything that tickles your particular fancies — teenage wizards, goopy aliens, hunky Scotsmen, shark attack survivors, the history of Vladislav's Wallachia, whatever Malcolms your Cowley.

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Movies
3:35 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Sundance A Lab For Changing Models In Film, TV

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 5:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Author Interviews
3:35 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

When Pop Broke Up With Jazz

Frank Sinatra captured by photographer William "PoPsie" Randolph during a 1943 concert. Author Ben Yagoda points to Sinatra as one of the interpreters who helped revive the Great American Songbook.
William "PoPsie" Randolph Courtesy of Riverhead

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 5:18 pm

Writer Ben Yagoda has set out to explain a shift in American popular culture, one that happened in the early 1950s. Before then, songwriters like Irving Berlin, George and Ira Gershwin and Jerome Kern wrote popular songs that achieved a notable artistry, both in lyrics and music.

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Movies
3:35 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

'American Sniper' Exposes Unresolved Issues About The Iraq War

Bradley Cooper stars in American Sniper, based on the life of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle.
Warner Bros.

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 5:18 pm

The movie American Sniper is a surprise box-office hit, but it has also become a lightning rod. Some critics say the film, based on the life of the late Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, glorifies war. Others say it doesn't accurately portray the real Kyle. Still others say the movie — and the reactions to it — are an example of the deep disconnect between civilians and the military.

The vitriol has been ugly, the story complicated. There is no one truth. But when it comes to war, the most credible sources are often people who've experienced it firsthand.

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It's All Politics
1:49 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

5 Surprises From President Obama's YouTube Interviews

President Obama poses for a selfie after being interviewed by YouTube stars GloZell Green (left), Hank Green and Bethany Mota.
YouTube

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 5:06 pm

The White House has been hitting it especially hard on social media these days — it rolled out several previews ahead of President Obama's State of the Union address and an enhanced "river of content" during the speech as well.

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Newscast
9:25 am
Fri January 23, 2015

World Games, China Spotlight and Gold Medals for Marchers

Iris Gross, Executive Director of the Birmingham International Center

Alabama is still buzzing over the news that Birmingham will be the host city for the 2021 World games. The first task in preparing to host the games will be to watch how Poland does it.

Wroclaw, Poland will be hosting the 2017 games and Alabama be taking notes on how that city handles it. Over four thousand athletes from one hundred countries usually take part.

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Monkey See
8:32 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Broad City' And Required Reading

NPR

On this week's Pop Culture Happy Hour, we're joined from Boston by PCHH's official enthusiastic librarian, Margaret Willison. We begin with a conversation about Broad City, the Comedy Central show that recently kicked off its second season (you can see the event Stephen talks about right here). We talk about some of the show's influences, some of what makes it special, and some of the ways it pushes against the boundaries of typical television.

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