Arts & Life

The Salt
1:53 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

We Didn't Build This City On Rock 'N' Roll. It Was Yogurt

A depiction of meal with cheese from Tacuinum Sanitatis, a medieval handbook on health and well-being based on the Taqwim al‑sihha, an 11th-century Arab medical treatise.
via Wikimedia

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 4:17 pm

Since The Salt is diving deep into yogurt this week, let's take a moment to rewind all the way back to 10,000 BC when it all began.

During the Paleolithic, or "Old Stone Age," humans relied on hunting and gathering for food and, as a result, lived a nomadic lifestyle. With the advent of the Neolithic, or "New Stone Age," around 10,000 BC, humans began the process of domesticating plants and animals in what is today the Middle East.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu July 16, 2015

A Tale Of Tarot And Boy Wizards Takes A Disturbing Turn In 'Child Eater'

Courtesy of Jo Fletcher Books

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 11:34 am

Like most things mystical, tarot cards aren't given much mainstream credence in our Internet age. Rachel Pollack, however, knows the magic they still contain.

Besides being simply another multiple-award-winning fantasy author, Pollack is a world-renowned authority on tarot. It's no shock, then, that her new book richly overlaps these areas of interest. The Child Eater is Pollack's first novel in over a decade, and it mixes medieval high fantasy, contemporary supernatural horror, and the mystic practice of the tarot into a winning, deceptively simple whole.

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Thu July 16, 2015

'Go Set A Watchman' Is A Revelation On Race, Not A Disappointment

Andrea Mabry AP

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 10:02 am

Editor's note: spoilers ahead.

I don't remember how old I was when I read To Kill A Mockingbird for the first time. But I do know that I loved it — which is why I was thrilled in February at the news that another manuscript penned by Harper Lee, previously unknown to the larger public, existed and would be published this summer.

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The Seams
3:34 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Men Strut Their Stuff At Their Very Own New York Fashion Week

Designer Thom Browne says he usually shows his men's collections in Paris, but he felt it was important to support the first Fashion Week for men in New York.
Jacki Lyden

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 10:33 am

Men's fashion is having a huge moment: Higher sales, more designers, and now, the first-ever, stand-alone New York Fashion Week: Men's, which closes tonight.

Celebrated designer Thom Browne opened the week: "I do show my men's collection in Paris," he says. "But, it being the inaugural season for Men's Fashion Week here in New York, it was really important for me to be here and support men's fashion here in New York."

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The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Obama: 'No Precedent' To Revoke Bill Cosby's Presidential Medal Of Freedom

President Obama joins comedian Bill Cosby and others to sing "Happy Birthday" to Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., on March 8, 2009, at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.
Haraz N. Ghanbari AP

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 3:56 pm

President Obama says there's "no precedent" to revoke the Presidential Medal of Freedom for comedian Bill Cosby, who has been accused by several women of sexually assaulting them.

"There's no precedent for revoking the medal," Obama said at a news conference today. "We don't have that mechanism."

Cosby was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2002 for his contributions to television.

Here are Obama's full comments on the allegations against Cosby:

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Author Interviews
2:26 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

'Cartel' Author Spins A Grand Tale Of Mexico's Drug Wars

In 2013, residents of some towns in western Mexico took up arms in an effort to defend their villages against drug gangs.
Marco Ugarte AP

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 3:42 pm

Novelist Don Winslow has spent 10 years immersed in the Mexican drug wars. He has studied all the players, from the lowly traffickers to the kingpins who head up the cartels. One of the characters in his new novel, The Cartel, is based on drug kingpin Joaquin Guzman, known as El Chapo, who escaped from a Mexican prison over the weekend.

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Commentary
12:45 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Tracing The Origin Of The Campaign Promise To 'Tell It Like It Is'

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has promised to "tell it like it is" during his presidential campaign.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 5:50 pm

"I tell it like it is." Chris Christie made this his campaign slogan. Donald Trump repeats it whenever he's challenged on something he has said. And Scott Walker, Rick Perry, Mike Huckabee, John Kasich and Rick Santorum have said the same thing. It's the conventional pledge of candor, or what passes for it in American public life.

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The Salt
12:42 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

What Ever Happened To The Boozy Cake In 'To Kill A Mockingbird'?

A Lane cake is a layered sponge cake filled with a rich mixture of egg yolks, butter, sugar, raisins and whiskey and topped with boiled icing.
Nadia Chaudhury for NPR

Originally published on Sun July 19, 2015 7:45 am

To mark this week's release of Harper Lee's long-awaited second novel, Go Set a Watchman, why not try an old-fashioned cake from Alabama, featured prominently in Lee's classic first novel, To Kill a Mockingbird.

In it, Scout Finch's neighbor, Maudie Atkinson, is known for her Lane cakes and guards her recipe closely. She bakes one for Aunt Alexandra when she moves in with the Finch Family. Scout gets buzzed from the whiskey in it and comments, "Miss Maudie Atkinson baked a Lane cake so loaded with shinny it made me tight."

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Arts & Life
12:31 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Jon Vickers, Intense Canadian Tenor, Dies At 88

Tenor Jon Vickers in the title role of Benjamin Britten's opera Peter Grimes at New York's Metropolitan Opera in 1983.
James Heffernan Metropolitan Opera Archives

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 1:31 pm

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Arts & Life
12:31 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Is Transparency The Music Industry's Next Battle?

Taylor Swift performs in Dublin. In June, Swift protested Apple's payments to musicians in its new Apple Music streaming service.
Carrie Davenport Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 11:48 am

The issue of how much musicians theoretically earn from their work has moved out of the trade press and into social media's trending topics recently, whether that's Taylor Swift demonstrating her clout via a successful protest of Apple Music or Jay Z's Tidal promising artists higher royalty rates than other streaming services. In the background of these debates is the question of whether songwriters and performers are actually getting all the money they're owed.

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Arts & Life
7:32 am
Wed July 15, 2015

Forsooth! A visit to Camp Shakespeare EXTREME

What did you do during your last trip to summer camp? Maybe a little canoeing or making s’mores around the campfire? Some youngsters visiting Montgomery have something else in mind. They’re trading arts and crafts for performing classic characters like Lady MacBeth and Hamlet. Meet Camp Shakespeare Extreme.

“Oh, gentle Romeo, if thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully. Or, if thou thinkst I am too quickly won, I’ll frown and say thee ‘nay,’ so thou wilt woo…” says sixteen year old Meredith from Helena, Alabama.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Wed July 15, 2015

'ZeroZeroZero' Argues Cocaine Is Everywhere ... But Is It Really?

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 10:06 am

Our understanding of politics and history often bends toward simplicity — toward using particular figures, events or, in the case of books like Mark Kurlansky's Salt: A World History, elements that help us grasp a movement, time period or even the grand development of human civilization.

Roberto Saviano's ZeroZeroZero follows Salt's lead but switches up the white substance: The thesis of Saviano's sprawling, ultimately unwieldy book is that by understanding the global cocaine trade we can gain unparalleled knowledge of the world we live in.

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The Salt
5:58 pm
Tue July 14, 2015

The 'Immortal' Homemade Yogurt That Traveled 'Round The World

A recent batch of Veena Mehra's yogurt in Houston. She's been making yogurt the same way, with the same starter, for about 40 years.
Courtesy of Nishta Mehra

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 10:53 am

As Dan Charles reported on Monday, yogurt has a way of igniting passions. In his story of arson, the flames were literal.

Once you start looking, it's really not hard to find people — even entire countries — deeply attached to this nourishing and calming food.

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The Two-Way
5:57 pm
Tue July 14, 2015

Smithsonian To Post Sign At Exhibition Featuring Bill Cosby-Owned Art

Quilts from the Bill and Camille Cosby collection hang at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C., in this Nov. 6, 2014, photo.
Evan Vucci AP

The Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art in Washington will post a sign Wednesday telling visitors an exhibition that includes art owned by Bill Cosby and his wife, Camille, is "fundamentally about the artworks and the artists who created them, not Mr. Cosby," representatives for the Smithsonian Institution say.

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Around the Nation
4:32 pm
Tue July 14, 2015

Residents Of Harper Lee's Hometown Celebrate 'Go Set A Watchman'

Originally published on Tue July 14, 2015 6:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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