Alabama National Weather Service

Alabamians are remembering the April 27th, 2011 tornadoes that rampaged across the state.

Now, the National Weather Service in Alabama is using a new severe weather warning system.

Stephen Latimer is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Huntsville. He says this new system provides more details about the storms.

Alabama is delaying its planned severe weather preparedness day because of the very real severe weather much of the state is experiencing.

Tomorrow was supposed to be "Ready Alabama Preparedness Day." Events would have included thousands of schoolchildren gathering in downtown Birmingham for weather education sessions. But the state says it's delaying the event out of caution and concern for the safety of both students and the first responders who would be teaching the sessions.

Weather forecasters along the Tennessee Valley are warning residents of northern and central Alabama to be on guard for icy roads this morning.

The overall threat of snow and sleet has eased over much of Alabama. But temperatures are expected to hover right around the freezing mark, and in some cases below freezing, as residents recover from a nasty ice storm.

National Weather Service

Temperatures plummeted across Alabama after storms left flooding and scattered damage across the state.

Al.com reports that crews from the National Weather Service were being sent to Pike, Bullock and Russell counties to determine whether tornadoes snapped trees and caused other damage in those areas.

Weather service reports show temperatures fell as much as 15 degrees from midnight until morning rush hour Monday. And forecasters say overnight lows could drop to the mid-20s as far south as the coast.

National Weather Service

Forecasters have issued a heat advisory covering the entire state of Alabama as temperatures are expected to approach 100 degrees.

The National Weather Service said the heat advisory will be in effect starting at 11 a.m. Friday.

Weather service forecasters expect temperatures to range from 95 degrees to 100 degrees across much of the state.

Forecasters say the heat index -- what the temperature feels like -- will climb to 110 degrees in some areas.

In the Mobile area, highs are expected to hit 96 degrees Friday, 98 on Saturday and 99 on Sunday.

National Weather Service

Soaring temperatures are prompting warnings about extreme heat in parts of Alabama.

Highs in the upper 90s will combine with humidity to make it feel like it's nearly 110 degrees in some areas.

Forecasters say it will be even worse over the weekend as temperatures climb higher and rain chances remain low.

The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory that reaches from north of Birmingham southward in to southeastern corner of the state.

Forecasters say the advisory extends from Friday morning through Sunday night.

National Weather Service

Forecasters have issued a flood advisory for several areas of central Alabama.

The National Weather Service is warning of urban and small stream flooding Tuesday afternoon in areas that include Prattville, Millbrook and Montgomery.

Forecasters say they're expecting between 1 and 2 inches of rain and the risk of flooding is greatest in low lying and flood prone areas.

Officials say drivers should avoid traveling over roads covered by water because it could be deeper than it looks.

National Weather Service

It may be hot now, but forecasters say Alabama could soon see another round of records for cool temperatures.

A cold front moving through the state Monday brings the possibility of strong storms to south Alabama. But the National Weather Service says conditions will change quickly.

Daytime heat indexes in the low 100s will give way to overnight lows in the 50s and low 60s by Wednesday.

The National Weather Service says the chill could break records dating as far back as 1889, when Montgomery reached a summertime record low for the date of 66 degrees.

National Weather Service

The National Weather Service is warning of severe thunderstorms and flash floods in in several areas of Alabama.

Forecasters said Tuesday that a storm capable of producing winds of up to 60 mph was spotted 14 miles north of Evergreen and is expected to move northeast at about 35 mph. The severe thunderstorm watch spans several areas of northeast, central and south Alabama.

Forecasters say the storm is expected to cause rain in areas where the soil is already saturated from a previous round of bad weather.

National Weather Service

Power is out in parts of north Alabama after storms moved across the area.

Huntsville Utilities says a line of storms with lightning and winds knocked out electrical service in the Hazel Green area of Madison County on Thursday.

Crews were working on that outage along with several smaller ones in the area.

The National Weather Service issued a flash flood warning for parts of Madison and Limestone counties after as much as 3 inches of rain fell in a brief period.

Forecasters say another 2 inches of rain is possible in parts of the Tennessee Valley.

National Weather Service

More rain and the chance of floods are headed toward southwest Alabama, which is still drying out from a deluge last week.

The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch from Friday afternoon through Sunday for an area that includes Mobile and the tourist towns of Gulf Shores and Orange Beach.

Forecasters say rainfall amounts of 1 inch to 3 inches are expected, and some areas could receive as much as 7 inches of rain.

National Weather Service

As a weekend with little rain in the forecast approached, residents in many parts of Alabama were still mopping up after more than two feet of rain fell in some areas in a two-day span.

The storms also brought ferocious winds and possible tornadoes to some areas.

Some of the heaviest totals of Tuesday and Wednesday rains ranged from 22 inches to 26 inches over Perdido Bay, Wolf Bay, Foley and Orange Beach, based on radar estimates, Al.com reported.

National Weather Service

The National Weather Service says at least four tornadoes touched down in Alabama during this week's storms, including an EF-2 tornado that flung a semitrailer onto the roof of an industrial plant in the Fort Payne area.

The Fort Payne-area twister was brief but powerful, with estimated winds up to 125 mph. Survey crews from the weather service say it flipped three large semitrailers, vaulting one into the air and onto the factory's roof around 12:30 a.m. Friday.

National Weather Service

Forecasters say parts of Alabama could have more than a foot of snow on the ground by the time the wintry precipitation ends.

A winter storm warning covers nearly the entire northern half of the state. Many schools and businesses are closed or opening late Wednesday.

The National Weather Service says Tuesday's snow and ice totals ranged from a trace north of Birmingham to 6 inches in Alabama's northeastern corner.

National Weather Service

Alabama is bracing for a one-two punch of winter weather expected to bring ice and snow accumulations across central and north Alabama.

The National Weather Service in Birmingham has issued a winter storm warning beginning 9 p.m. Monday. The warning area includes the cities of Hamilton, Jasper, Birmingham, Hoover, Pell City Tuscaloosa and Gadsden.

Forecasters say accumulations of one to two inches of snow are possible across much of north central Alabama. Accumulations of up to two-tenths of freezing rain are also possible.

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