Alabama heroin overdoses

Alabama Center for Rural Enterprise

A new report on sanitation and drinking water has singled out Lowndes County, Alabama for its widespread lack of sewage systems for its residents.

According to the report from the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, around 80 percent of Lowndes County residents don’t have access to municipal waste treatment and have to install their own septic systems. Those systems can cost up to $30,000 thanks to the type of soil in the area, and the median household income in Lowndes County is just $26,000.

Law officers in northwest Alabama say they are seeing a surge of heroin abuse and crime related to the drug.

They say the resurgence of heroin in Alabama in recent years mirrors national patterns.

The Times-Daily reports that authorities in several northwest Alabama counties say they didn't see heroin in their areas before 2013. But in the past two years, they've made arrests for drug crimes related to its sale. In Lauderdale County, officials reported five overdose-related deaths this year.

(Information in the following story is from: The Birmingham News,

The Jefferson County Coroner says 57 people died because of heroin overdoses in 2012 and the figure is nearly double the number of people who died after overdosing on the drug in 2011. reports heroin was also listed as a contributing factor in five other deaths in 2012.

Authorities say 30 people died in Jefferson County from overdoses on the drug in 2011, which was nearly double the number of people who died from overdosing on the drug in 2010.