Alabama Emergency Management Agency

Emergency planners and other officials from Alabama and Mississippi will be meeting in Mobile next week for a two-state conference on hurricane preparedness in the area.

The Alabama Emergency Management Agency and Mississippi Emergency Management Agency are hosting the Central Gulf Coast Hurricane Conference starting Tuesday. The conference will give groups such as volunteer organizations and faith-based groups to discuss hurricane response plans with government response agencies.

Today may be the day of reckoning for supporters of football at The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

UAB President Ray Watts says he will announce his decision today on whether to reinstate the Blazers football program, as well as the bowling and rifle teams. The initial announcement to cancel UAB football angered students, alumni, and local community leaders.

We spoke to Birmingham City Council President Johnathan Austin about the situation. He says the loss of UAB football has a wide impact. / Alabama Emergency Management Agency

The head of the Alabama Emergency Management Agency says timing, better forecasting and preparation helped the state avoid a repeat of the problems that occurred during a winter storm two weeks ago.

Agency Director Art Faulkner tells The Associated Press that many difficulties were avoided because the worst of the frozen precipitation fell late Wednesday and early Thursday instead of during the middle of the day.

Alabama Emergency Management Agency officials received an early wake-up call and were notified that Hurricane Juliet had made landfall at about 2 a.m. near Pascagoula, Miss.

Hurricane Juliet was not real, but it gave EMA local officials and the National Weather Service a chance Tuesday to practice what they would do in the event of a real category 3 storm.

Most of the exercise took place at EMA headquarters in Clanton.

Alabama's Emergency Management Agency plans to conduct an exercise to practice how the state would respond if a Category 3 hurricane were to enter the Gulf of Mexico.

   EMA officials said they would work with other state agencies and private groups to simulate the state's response to a hurricane.

   For the purpose of the exercise, the simulated storm will be called Hurricane Juliet. EMA officials said more than 170 people would participate in the exercise, which will begin at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the EMA headquarters in Clanton.

Nick Oxford for The New York Times

Alabama's governor says the state stands ready to help Oklahoma recover from a deadly tornado.