Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Al Hicks / NY Dept. of Environmental Conservation

A researcher in Georgia who has studied one of Alabama's biggest bat colonies says the colony could be all but wiped out within years by the deadly fungus that causes white-nose syndrome.

Encyclopedia of Alabama

    An obituary says the Gadsden resident died Monday at the age of 99. No cause of death is listed. 

 Martin helped build the modern Republican Party in Alabama. He became the first Republican elected to the U.S. House from Alabama in seven decades in 1964 and served one term.

Merlin D. Tuttle, Bat Conservation International

A disease that's affecting bats nationwide has been found in a species in Alabama for the first time. 

 A statement from the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources says white-nose syndrome has now been detected in the southeastern bat.

Byrne snapper
byrne.house.gov

This year’s federal red snapper season on the Gulf Coast is scheduled to begin a week from today. And it’s scheduled to end just 72 hours later.

That short season has outraged anglers and business owners on Alabama’s coast – and it has U.S. lawmakers scrambling to do something about it.

U.S. Representative Bradley Byrne represents Alabama’s 1st Congressional District, including the Gulf Coast. He’s been working on the red snapper season for years, and he’s one of five lawmakers currently petitioning Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to intervene and extend the season on an emergency basis.

 Alabama's wildlife agency says more hunters are reporting the number of deer they kill in the state under a new, mandatory system. 

A statement from the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources says hunters had reported killing about 81,000 deer in the state as of Feb. 9.

That compares to fewer than 20,000 kills that were reported during each of the last three years.

The difference is at least in part because of a new law that requires hunters to report deer harvests. Such reporting was previously voluntary.

 State wildlife officials are cautioning hunters that it remains illegal to bait deer despite the drought that damaged wildlife food plots.

Officials with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources say they have written a large number of citations for baiting deer.    

State law forbids hunters from hunting over bait. Food must be 100 yards away from the hunter and out of the hunter's line of sight.

Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Director Chuck Sykes said there is a false rumor that baiting has been allowed because of 2016's drought.

Governor Robert Bentley’s proposed constitutional amendment authorizing a state lottery would send proceeds from ticket sales to the state's general fund.

The proposal says any proceeds from the lottery after expenses and prizes would go to the general fund for "ordinary expenses of the executive, legislative and judicial departments of the state."

Some have said the money should be directed specifically toward education.

Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore’s effort to have his ethics charges dismissed has been thrown out by a federal judge.

Yesterday afternoon, U.S. District Judge Harold Allbritton issued an order dismissing Moore’s lawsuit against the Alabama Judicial Inquiry Commission. Alabama’s chief justice is facing ethics charges that could result in his removal from office, and Judge Allbritton says that state process should continue without federal interference.

The state is looking to pay for outside legal counsel to represent Governor Robert Bentley and his Law Enforcement Chief. A-P-R student reporter Katie Willem has more…

The state will pay up to two hundred thousand dollars to represent Gov. Robert Bentley and his law enforcement chief in a wrongful termination lawsuit.        The legal action is being brought forward by the governor's fired secretary of law enforcement.

Supreme Court
Equal Justice Initiative

The U.S. Supreme Court says lower courts in Alabama and two other states must re-examine three death penalty convictions for evidence of racial prejudice in jury selection.

The court ruled yesterday in the cases of Christopher Floyd of Alabama, Jabari Williams of Louisiana and Curtis Giovanni Flowers of Mississippi.

A federal jury has found former Birmingham Health Care CEO Jonathan Dunning guilty on 98 counts of conspiracy, wire fraud, bank fraud and money laundering.

According to AL.com, jurors began deliberating last Tuesday afternoon, and finally reached a verdict Friday. Dunning was acquitted on another 14 counts.

A federal appeals court has declined to stop an upcoming execution in Alabama.

Yesterday, the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals denied an emergency stay sought by inmate Christopher Eugene Brooks. Brooks is scheduled to be put to death tomorrow for the 1992 rape and murder of Jo Deann Campbell.

Brooks’s attorney had asked the court to stay the execution until a federal judge reviews the state's new lethal injection drug combination. A hearing on the constitutionality of those drugs is scheduled for April.

The state of Alabama has a general fund budget in place for the new fiscal year beginning in less than two weeks.

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley signed the state's general fund budget yesterday morning. He says the spending plan isn’t perfect, but it is a step in the right direction for the state.

Lawmakers passed a $1.7 billion budget on Wednesday after months of negotiations over a substantial budget shortfall. Legislators approved a 25-cent-per-pack cigarette tax increase and a transfer of $80 million in education funds to minimize cuts to state services.

Governor Robert Bentley says the state faces a “real crisis” with its budget. Bentley is now taking his fight to fill the state’s coffers to the streets.

The governor is continuing his tour of speaking engagements to rally support for his proposed $541 million tax proposal. He spoke at Guntersville State Park yesterday.

Karin Dalziel

If you rescue an orphaned or injured wild animal in Alabama you could find yourself in a sticky situation, especially if it's one of the seven species that are no longer allowed to be cared for and rehabilitated under the new regulations.  

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Rainbow Wildlife Rescue and Wildlife

Wildlife lovers are protesting a new state rule they say is a death sentence for helpless baby raccoons, skunks and other wild animals in Alabama.

The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources says it will no longer issue permits letting groups or individuals rehabilitate raccoons, skunks, opossums, foxes, coyotes, feral pigs or bats.

The agency says anyone who finds an orphaned or sick animal should leave it in the wild, and humane organizations should euthanize any of the animals they receive.

But wildlife workers are appalled at the decision.

The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Alabama's wildlife agency is sponsoring a series of dove hunts for children.