Alabama civil rights movement

Civil Rights
10:50 am
Wed December 11, 2013

How The Media Covered The Civil Rights Movement: Black Newspapers

The plaque honoring Emory Jackson sits outside Nelson Brothers Cafe in Birmingham.
Ryan Vasquez

Let’s put you in the position of a being black person living in the South during the Civil Rights Movement.

“If you picked up a white newspaper you as a black person didn’t exist,” says Craig Flournoy.

Flournoy is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and professor of journalism at Southern Methodist University.

“There was no record of you being born, no record of you graduating from high school much less college, no record of you getting married, no record of your promotion and no record of you dying,” he says.

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Civil Rights Movement
9:09 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Former Students Look Back 50 Years After Integration of Tuskegee High School

Part of the exhibit at the Tuskegee center talks about the struggles of desegregating Tuskegee High School. Here, a photo from 1963 shows Alabama state troopers blocking the 13 black students from entering the high school on September 2, 1963.
Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center

All year long on Alabama Public Radio, we’re looking at the 50th anniversary of key moments in the civil rights movement. One of the biggest fights in the movement was the effort to desegregate schools. That included Tuskegee High School.  In 1963, a lawsuit was filed to desegregate, and a federal court agreed. Thirteen black students were chosen to integrate the school and anticipated starting classes with their white peers on September 2nd. APR recently went to Tuskegee to talk with former students as they look back 50 years after the desegregation of the high school.

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Civil Rights Movement
7:43 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Commemorative Gas Light Recognizes Freedom Riders

Alagasco is unveiling the fourth of five gas lights commemorating the civil rights movement in Alabama.
blog.alagasco.com

Alagasco has unveiled the fourth of five gas lights commemorating the civil rights movement in Alabama.

   A ceremony was held Thursday in Anniston for a gas light recognizing the Freedom Riders. They set out across the South in 1961 to test enforcement of federal rules banning segregation on interstate bus travel. But their Greyhound bus was burned in Anniston and they were attacked by a mob.

   The light is located near the Freedom Riders mural in Anniston, and it is across the street from the original Greyhound bus station.

Voting Rights Act
2:21 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Supreme Court Considers Voting Rights Act Challenge

One of the exhibits at the Civil Rights Memorial Center in Montgomery.
Ryan Vasquez

All year long here on Alabama Public Radio, we’re looking at the 50th anniversary of some of the pivotal moments in the Civil Rights Era. Times of have changed for the better since 1963, but have they changed so much that we can move on from laws meant to protect minorities. Shelby County is challenging a key provision of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 saying it’s no longer needed. Today Mason Davis is an accomplished lawyer in Birmingham, but in 1958 he was just a young law student trying to register to vote in Alabama.

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Birmingham Children's March
4:45 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

Students Re-Enact 1963 March Against Segregation

Students marched in Birmingham today to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Children's Crusade against racial segregation in 1963.
Credit Birmingham News/Birmingham Bar Foundation

More than 1,000 students are retracing a landmark civil rights march in Birmingham.


Students from a dozen high schools and colleges marched from the city's 16th Street Baptist Church on Thursday to mark the 50th anniversary of the Children's Crusade against racial segregation in 1963.

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Civil Rights
9:47 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

How The Media Covered The Civil Rights Movement: The Children's March

The Birmingham Fire Department point a hose at demonstrators.
Birmingham News/Birmingham Bar Foundation

Images of young black protesters being hit with fire hoses and police dogs in 1963 Birmingham are considered iconic. Hank Klibanoff saw them too. He was a fourteen year old paperboy in Florence when the Children’s march took place. He’s a Pulitzer Prize winner now. And what strikes him is where civil rights coverage wound up in the daily paper…

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Civil Rights Movement
10:30 am
Tue April 9, 2013

50 Years Since King’s Letter Recalls Spring Hill as Civil Rights Leader

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote his "Letter From a Birmingham Jail" after being arrested for violating a court order banning civil rights demonstrations.
baptistspirituality.wordpress.com

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