Alabama Accountability Act

centerpointhigh.jefcoed.com

Seventy-eight Alabama schools from both urban and rural areas are on the state's list of schools that are failing under a new law.

   The list released Tuesday includes many schools from the state's Black Belt region and city or county systems around Birmingham, Huntsville, Mobile and Montgomery.

   Parents who want to remove their children from the schools and send them to better ones can receive tax credits under the Alabama Accountability Act, passed by the state's Republican-controlled Legislature this year.

The state is releasing the names of schools that are failing under a new Alabama law that lets parents receive tax credits for sending their children to a better school.

   State Superintendent Tommy Bice holds a news conference in Montgomery on Tuesday morning to make the names public.

   The schools are being labeled as failing under the Alabama Accountability Act, passed by the state's Republican-controlled Legislature this year.

The Montgomery Advertiser

The Alabama Board of Education has delayed releasing a list of schools that are failing under language included in the Alabama Accountability Act.

   School board officials said Wednesday that the announcement by schools Superintendent Tommy Bice had been scheduled for Thursday, and was then rescheduled for next week. Officials said the release would likely be at 10 a.m. Tuesday in the media briefing room at the Gordon Persons Building.

State of Alabama

The Republican majority in the Alabama Legislature has handed the Republican governor a major defeat by rejecting his proposal to delay the start of private school tax credits for two years.

The House voted against the governor's proposal 57-10 Monday. Then the Senate agreed 19-15 at the urging of the architect of the tax credits, Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh. Republicans provided the decisive votes.

fox10tv.com

The Alabama House has rejected Gov. Robert Bentley's proposal to delay private school tax credits for two years.

The House voted 57-10 Monday to reject the governor's proposal. Now the proposal goes to the Senate on the last meeting day of the legislative session.

blog.al.com

Alabama's Republican governor isn't getting support from key Republicans or Democrats for his proposal to delay private school tax credits for two years.

The Republican architect of the tax credits, Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh, says a delay isn't needed.

The Senate Democratic Caucus and House Minority Leader Craig Ford say the tax credits should be repealed rather than delayed.

But Bentley is persisting. He sent a letter to legislators Friday and is contacting legislators urging them to support a delay when they wrap up the 2013 legislative session on Monday.

The Associated Press

Gov. Robert Bentley wants the Legislature to delay Alabama's private school tax credits for two years.

Bentley told chamber of commerce leaders Wednesday that a delay will give schools time to try to get off the failing list and will help the state repay a $423 million debt before the tax credits begin.

House Speaker Mike Hubbard and Senate leader Del Marsh says they will discuss Bentley's proposal with their members.

Teacher lobbyist Henry Mabry says the tax credits were a horrible mistake and they won't be any better in two years.

blog.al.com

The schools Accountability Act, which will give tuition grants for students to transfer from failing schools, may not be in its final form.

At a chamber of commerce breakfast on Monday, Gov. Robert Bentley indicated that he is reviewing the act and is considering sending it back to the Legislature with executive amendments by mid-week.

The governor's staff confirmed that although no specific approach has been finalized, Bentley is considering some possible amendments that would clarify its intent.

Alabama State House
AP

The Alabama Senate has approved legislation saying private schools and non-failing public schools don't have to take students transferring from failing public schools.

The Senate voted 21-12 Thursday for a bill making changes to the Alabama Accountability Act. The bill makes clear that a student transferring from a failing school in one school system to a non-failing school in another system has to provide his own transportation. It also tightens up which schools will be designated failing schools.

The Alabama Legislature is one step away from passing a bill that would make sure private schools and non-failing public schools don't have to take students who want to transfer from failing public schools.

The bill making transfers optional won approval in the House last week and in the Senate Education Committee on Tuesday. The bill by Republican Rep. Jim Carns of Mountain Brook now goes to the Senate for what could be a final vote.

jimcarns.com

The Alabama House passed a bill Tuesday night saying no public or private schools has to accept a student transferring from a failing public school under the new Alabama Accountability Act.

The bill by Republican Rep. Jim Carns of Mountain Brook passed 62-40 and now goes to the Senate. Proponents said the bill keeps some systems from being overrun with transfers they can't afford. Opponents said it gives affluent suburban school systems a reason to reject transfers from inner-city schools.

http://governor.alabama.gov / Office of the Governor

  Gov. Robert Bentley told retired educators that he signed a bill providing private school tax credits because of the flexibility it gives public schools to try new ideas to improve learning.

Bentley said he knew he would be facing an upset audience Tuesday when he addressed the Alabama Education Retirees Association in Montgomery, but he did it because of his respect for teachers.

Bentley told the retired educators, "Y'all are mad at me. I understand that."

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