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In the latest challenge to Alabama's ban on gay marriage, a lesbian couple is suing the state over recognition of their marriage, performed in Massachusetts. April and Ginger Aaron-Brush of Birmingham filed the lawsuit Tuesday in federal court in Birmingham.

The lawsuit asks a judge to declare the ban unconstitutional and require Alabama to recognize same-sex marriages performed validly in other states.

The American Civil Liberties Union is representing the couple.

Florida Atlantic University

Alabama has agreed to pay another $230,000 to civil rights groups that sued over Alabama's immigration law.

The agreement announced Monday brings the total paid by the state government to $580,000. Monday's agreement stemmed from a 2011 suit over a portion of the law that barred business transactions between the state and anyone who could not prove citizenship. The law prevented some people from renewing their mobile home registration tags, but the suit ended the enforcement of that aspect of the law.

AP Photo/Jamie Martin

A federal judge has approved a settlement to end the segregation of HIV-positive inmates in Alabama prisons.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson issued an opinion Monday saying the agreement isn't perfect but can take effect.

Female inmates already are living with other prisoners at the state's lone women's prison, and male inmates will be integrated into the general prison population next year.

AP Photo/Jamie Martin

A judge is set to rule on the fairness of a settlement ending the segregation of HIV-infected inmates in Alabama prisons.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson held a hearing on the agreement Thursday at Limestone prison near Harvest. Another hearing was held earlier this week at the state women's prison in Wetumpka.

An American Civil Liberties Union attorney representing prisoners, Margaret Winter, quotes Thompson as saying he will release a decision by midnight Monday.

Ran Hu / University of Michigan School of Social Work

Last week, the Alabama Department of Corrections announced the end of its practice of segregating prisoners with HIV. This came as a result of a successful lawsuit filed by the ACLU. Former inmate Louis Henderson is HIV positive and was one of the lead plaintiffs in the lawsuit. Alabama Public Radio's Ryan Vasquez recently spoke with Henderson, and askedĀ about his experience in the Alabama prison system and what the end of the segregation policy means to him.

Julie Bennett /

Alabama's new law setting stricter requirements for abortion doctors likely won't be enforced this year.

ACLU and Planned Parenthood attorneys challenging the law and state attorneys defending the law told a federal judge Friday that they want the law kept on hold until March 24, 2014, while they develop their cases. U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson indicated he would go along with the timeline proposed by both sides.

The American Civil Liberties Union is criticizing a new policy that requires Alabama prison visitors to have their fingerprints scanned.

David Fathi of the ACLU's National Prison Project tells the Montgomery Advertiser ( ) the new rule is "extreme."

Fathi says no other state has such a requirement. He says it's a barrier to people visiting state prisoners.

Prison spokesman Brian Corbett says the policy began last month as the department upgraded its computer systems.