2014 Governor's Race

The Associated Press

Gov. Robert Bentley has selected Alabama Power's top executive to serve as chairman of his inaugural committee.

Bentley says Mark Crosswhite of Birmingham will be in charge of planning an inauguration that brings people together regardless of political affiliation and that celebrates the things that make Alabama great.

Crosswhite is chairman, president and chief executive officer of Alabama Power.

blog.al.com

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says he plans to use any leftover campaign funds to benefit the state.

Bentley said Friday he will set up a charitable organization to receive his leftover funds and then distribute them to projects. He said no projects are definite, but one group he would like to help is foster children.

Bentley did something similar with his inaugural fund in 2011. He raised $1.6 million in donations to pay for his inauguration and had more than $300,000 left. He donated that to the state General Fund to support state agencies during a lean budget year.

al.com

Alabama's race for governor is heating up with Republican incumbent Robert Bentley releasing his first ad that focuses on his opponent.

Bentley's campaign posted an ad on social media Monday describing how Parker Griffith was elected to Congress as a Democrat, switched to the Republican Party and lost, and then switched back to the Democratic Party to run for governor.

The 30-second ad asks, "If Parker Griffith doesn't know who he is or what he stands for, how can we trust him to lead Alabama?"

al.com

A new national study says Alabama ranks 14th in the nation for money spent so far on television advertising during the 2014 elections.

The study by the nonpartisan Center for Public Integrity says candidates in Alabama had aired more than 30,000 TV ads through Oct. 6 that cost an estimated $10 million. That's about $2.80 per eligible voter.

The report says $2.6 million has been spent in the governor's race, with Republican incumbent Robert Bentley accounting for $2.1 million of that.

al.com

Alabama voters aren't likely to see debates between Alabama's two candidates for governor.

Representatives of Republican incumbent Robert Bentley and Democratic challenger Parker Griffith had been talking about scheduling debates, but those talks failed.

Bentley says he welcomed a spirited exchange, but Griffith was only interested in negative campaigning and name-calling.

Griffith says Bentley is unmanly and arrogant for not being willing to debate his policies.

blog.al.com

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley is maintaining a large fundraising lead over Democratic challenger Parker Griffith.

The Republican incumbent has raised more than $5 million in contributions in his quest to win a second term.

Campaign fundraising reports filed Wednesday show that Bentley added more than $400,000 to his campaign war chest in August.

Wikimedia Commons

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will swing through the south as part of another jam-packed month of travel boosting Republican candidates.

Christie is planning visits to more than half a dozen states in August, including Mississippi and Alabama. He has been traveling the country in his role as chair of the Republican Governors Association.

On August 12, Christie will return to Maine to campaign for incumbent Gov. Paul LePage.

The next day he'll head to Birmingham, Alabama to boost Gov. Robert Bentley, then to Biloxi, Mississippi for Gov. Phil Bryant.

opensecrets.org

The Democratic nominee for governor, Parker Griffith, calls Republican incumbent Robert Bentley timid and irresponsible.

Griffith says he plans to focus his general election campaign on Bentley refusing to expand the state Medicaid program and not doing enough to increase jobs in the state.

Bentley said Wednesday he doesn't like negative campaigning, and he will focus his campaign on his records and his goals. He says politicians might not be very good candidates if they have to spend their time talking about how bad their opponents are.