Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of NPR's Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts the program with Renee Montagne and David Greene.

Known for probing questions to everyone from presidents to warlords to musicians, Inskeep has a passion for stories of the less famous—like an American soldier who lost both feet in Afghanistan, or an Ethiopian woman's extraordinary journey to the United States.

Since joining Morning Edition in 2004, Inskeep has hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, Karachi, Cairo, Houston and Tehran; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a 2006 Robert F. Kennedy journalism award for "The Price of African Oil," on conflict in Nigeria. In 2012 he traveled 2,700 miles across North Africa in the wake of the Arab Spring. In 2013 he reported from war-torn Syria, and on Iran's historic election. In 2014 he drove with colleagues 2,428 miles along the entire U.S.-Mexico border; the resulting radio series, "Borderland," won widespread attention, as did the acclaimed NPR online magazine of the same name.

Inskeep says Morning Edition works to "slow down the news," making sense of fast-moving events. A prime example came during the 2008 Presidential campaign, when Inskeep and NPR's Michele Norris conducted "The York Project," groundbreaking conversations about race, which received an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence.

Inskeep was hired by NPR in 1996. His first full-time assignment was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush. After the September 11, 2001, attacks, he covered the war in Afghanistan, turmoil in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid gone wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of NPR News teams awarded the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for coverage of Iraq.

On days of bad news, Inskeep is inspired by the Langston Hughes book, Laughing to Keep From Crying. Of hosting Morning Edition during the 2008 financial crisis and Great Recession, he told Nuvo magazine when "the whole world seemed to be falling apart, it was especially important for me ... to be amused, even if I had to be cynically amused, about the things that were going wrong. Laughter is a sign that you're not defeated."

Inskeep is the author of Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi, a 2011 book on one of the world's great megacities. He is also author of Jacksonland, a forthcoming history of President Andrew Jackson's long-running conflict with John Ross, a Cherokee chief who resisted the removal of Indians from the eastern United States in the 1830's.

He has been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, NBC's Meet the Press, MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports, CNN's Inside Politics and the PBS Newhour. He has written for publications including The New York Times, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and The Atlantic.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

Never mind legalizing pot. Kokomo, Ind., has legalized pinball. The city council ended a ban that stretches back to 1955. Back then, the council said pinball worked against "peace and good order." Wives complained about husbands who gambled away their entire paychecks. In more recent times, the ban seems to have been ignored. At last the city council has revoked it, taking its chances on keeping the peace. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Good...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: We have a global conversation this morning about resistance to globalization. NPR's Frank Langfitt is in North East England in the U.K., which voted this year to leave the European Union. Hi, Frank. FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve. INSKEEP: And David Wessel is in our studios here in Washington. Good morning, David. DAVID WESSEL: Good morning, Steve. INSKEEP: He's with the Brookings Institution and The...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: When the Electoral College casts 538 votes for president this month, 38 will come from the state of Texas. All 38 were expected to go to Donald Trump. But Art Sisneros, one of the electors, says he just can't do it. ART SISNEROS: I came to the conclusion, well, I can't vote for Donald Trump. I don't, in good conscience, think that he's qualified. INSKEEP: Sisneros is resigning as an elector rather than vote for a...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Cokie Roberts is with us next. She's going to be joining us on Wednesdays from now on and doing something different than she's done over the years for MORNING EDITION. It's a segment we call Ask Cokie. It's a chance for us, meaning you, to ask questions of this very experienced political reporter and analyst about how the government works, about how our politics work, about how we got where we are today. Hi,...

You can re-enact that scene in the old movie Christmas Vacation. A family goes into a forest and cuts down a ridiculously tall tree. The U.S. Forest Service is selling Christmas tree removal permits for $5 in the Green Mountain National Forest of Vermont. You go into the forest. You cut down the tree yourself. There's only one catch: the tree you choose cannot be more than 20 feet tall. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Good morning, I'm Steve...

When you walk into the Smithsonian's " Art of the Qur'an " exhibition, you're met with a book that weighs 150 pounds. The tome, which dates back to the late-1500s, has giant pages that are covered in gold and black Arabic script. "Somebody spent a lot of time, probably years, to complete this manuscript," says curator Massumeh Farhad. "... The size tells you a great deal about it. I mean, clearly this was not a manuscript that could have been taken out every day for private reading. This was...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Let's learn some more about people who have been offered posts in the administration of President-elect Donald Trump. Retired Lieutenant General Michael Flynn is Trump's choice for national security adviser, we have confirmed. Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions is the choice for attorney general of the United States and a congressman from Kansas, Mike Pompeo, is the choice for CIA director. Let's begin with NPR's...

The presidential election looks very different from the heights of the economy than it does from its depths. In North Carolina, rural Bertie County, the poorest in the state, and tech hub Wake County, the most prosperous, are less than two hours apart by car in this important presidential swing state. And yet they could almost be on opposite sides of the world. Charlotte Gilliam, a resident of Bertie, says the difference between there and Wake is "from here to China." One county represents an...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: This election looks very different from the top and the bottom of the economy. We saw that when visiting the richest county and the poorest county in North Carolina, which is a presidential swing state. The poorest is a rural zone. We visit elsewhere on today's program. The richest is Wake County, where the median household income is $66,000, far above that of the nation as a whole. TODD MASINTER: And we're going...

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump this week visited Florida, a vitally important battleground state, to fight the campaign's final rounds. To get an up-close look, NPR went to Tampa for a Trump rally on Monday and the next day, went to one for Clinton in Broward County in South Florida. For each rally, we met with voters who'd lined up hours early — then we passed through the Secret Service checkpoint and settled in for the show. Each rally sent many messages, both intended and unintended, and...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: We dropped by a rally for Donald Trump the other day and then went to one for Hillary Clinton. Both were in the battleground state of Florida. We talked with people who were first in line to see each candidate and heard their wildly different views in the same state. Before the Trump rally in Tampa, a mass of people waited for a gate to swing open. Hi, guys. UNIDENTIFIED TRUMP SUPPORTERS: Hi. UNIDENTIFIED...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: And I'm Steve Inskeep with the sound of two campaign rallies - one for Donald Trump, one for Hillary Clinton. We attended them on consecutive days in the vitally important state of Florida. People waited hours to get in, as we hear elsewhere this morning. And then the rallies started almost the same. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: I pledge allegiance to the flag... (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED...

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: I'm Steve Inskeep in Atlanta. DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene in Washington, D.C. And Steve, you're in the state of Georgia. And I know this is the first of four stops we'll be making around these presidential debates. Can you just remind our listeners what we're doing here? INSKEEP: Yeah. We're visiting divided states in this divided country. Georgia's a Republican state, it has been in presidential...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: And I'm Steve Inskeep in Atlanta, the capital of Georgia, one of the divided states, where we stood on the porch of a house on Sunday. American flag decoration by the front door, life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. And you can hear that we're near the airport. TONYA HICKS: He usually don't do nothing. INSKEEP: Hi. HICKS: How y'all doing? INSKEEP: OK. I'm Steve, by the way. HICKS: Hey, Steve. Come on in....

Copyright 2016 Georgia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Georgia Public Broadcasting . STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: And I'm Steve Inskeep in Atlanta, Ga., which is one of the divided states. We're visiting several states this fall, divided states as we call them in this election season. On this morning of the first presidential debate, we are listening to voters in many Georgia communities, including outside Macon, Ga., which is where we have found reporter Grant Blankenship of Georgia Public...

Jimmy and Dami Arno of the Atlanta suburb of Lawrenceville, Ga., say the country is in trouble. "I know that we were a whole lot further along racially 8 years ago than we are today," Jimmy says. They plan on voting for Donald Trump this November. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: And I'm Steve Inskeep in Atlanta. We're hearing stories of Georgia voters on this morning of a presidential debate. We plan to bring the same voters back tomorrow to...

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Retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn has been an outspoken supporter of Donald Trump, offering some credibility to the foreign policy newcomer. But on a key priority of the GOP presidential nominee — banning travel to the United States from areas affected by terrorism — Flynn acknowledged some of Trump's ideas are "not workable." In a Morning Edition interview, NPR's Steve Inskeep asked Flynn, "In the end do we have here a laudable effort to protect the United States from all harm that is just...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VlX_5WKwcA Speaker of the House Paul Ryan will play a prominent role at this week's Republican convention. But he will not be shaping the convention's messages — and a talk with Ryan suggests how different the convention might be if he did. We sat with the speaker Thursday , beneath the vaulted ceiling of a corner conference room. It's part of his office suite at the Capitol, which he took over less than a year ago. In a 35-minute conversation, Ryan sketched...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VlX_5WKwcA Surely one of the hardest jobs at the Republican convention belongs to House Speaker Paul Ryan, who will preside over it. It's hard even though Ryan has said his responsibilities are largely ceremonial. His job is harder than that of Donald Trump fans, for whom the convention can be a celebration. It's trickier than that of Trump's remaining opponents, some of whom are not attending at all. Ryan is a Trump critic who has vowed to support him for the...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkfiF_tugU0 How has America changed after eight tumultuous years under President Obama? We put that big question to scores of people in seven states. We chose places where the president delivered speeches about his vision for America. What we collected is not the "inside story" of Obama's administration. It is the outside story. By design, we questioned night shift workers, food servers, business owners and sometimes people we encountered at random. What emerged...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnBmOPZI_Wc President Obama says he agrees with Donald Trump on one thing: There are "parallels" between the U.S. election and the United Kingdom's dramatic vote to leave the European Union. Obama describes the parallels differently, however. Trump described Britons "taking their country back." Obama says the Brexit vote and Trump's campaign both are marked by "xenophobia" and a fear of "funny-looking people." Obama spoke during a wide-ranging interview with NPR...

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