Stan Ingold

Assistant News Director

Born in Morehead Kentucky, Stan Ingold got his start in public radio as a volunteer at Morehead State Public Radio.  He worked there throughout his college career as a reporter, host and producer and was hired on as the Morning Edition Host after graduating with a degree in History from Morehead State University. He remained there for nearly three years. Along with working in radio he spent a great deal of time coaching speech and forensics at Rowan County Senior High School in Morehead, working with students and teaching them broadcasting techniques for competitions. 

Stan arrived at Alabama Public Radio in March of 2011. Since then he has been busy criscrossing the state gathering news stories and bringing them to you, the listener. His story on the Key Underwood Coondog Memorial Cemetery recently earned him a regional Edward R Murrow Award for Feature Reporting.

Ways to Connect

The commander of Redstone Arsenal says 911 calls about a potential active shooter prompted lockdown; no shooter was found.  

Authorities locked down post today amid reports of possible active shooter. About two hours later, the all-clear was given and officials said there were no confirmed injuries or arrests.

An Alabama mayor is offering to take Confederate-related monuments recently disassembled in New Orleans.

Hanceville Mayor Kenneth Nail wrote to New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, asking him to consider donating the monuments for display in Veterans Memorial Park in Hanceville. The town of about 3,250 people is about 40 miles north of Birmingham.

www.fma.alabama.gov

Alabama is getting a $100,000 federal grant to encourage school districts to buy fresh local fruits and vegetables.

 The Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries said Friday that the U.S. Department of Agriculture grant will support a coalition called the Alabama Farm to School Cooperative.

Alabama ranked 44th in an annual national assessment of child well-being that looks at poverty, education and health access. 

 The Kids Count report was released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Only Arkansas, Arizona, Nevada, Louisiana, New Mexico, and Mississippi ranked lower than Alabama.

Alabama improved in 11 of 16 indicators. The state ranked well, for example, in the percentage of children with health insurance. Only three percent of children were without health insurance.

ice.gov

An Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainee has been charged in connection to a fire inside the Etowah County Detention Center.     

Etowah County Lt. Robin Grant tells local media that 22-year-old Okiemute Omatie of Lagos, Nigeria, is charged with one count of first-degree arson and one count of destruction of state property in connection with the May 26 fire.

Fellow Republicans are pressing President Donald Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with former FBI Director James Comey.   

And if he does, they want the president to hand them over to Congress or else possibly face a subpoena.

The request is a sign of escalating fallout from riveting testimony from Comey last week of undue pressure from Trump. Trump has responded to Comey's assertions by accusing him of lying.

traillink.com

A $333,000 grant has been awarded to Decatur and will be used to extend the Bill Sims Bike Trail farther into the southwest part of the city. 

Republican state Senator Arthur Orr, of Decatur, said Friday the federal grant is administered through the Alabama Department of Transportation's Transportation Alternative Program.

The Decatur Daily reports the roughly 1-mile asphalt trail would run along the north side of Modaus Road from Cedar Ridge Middle School to Jack Allen Private Drive near Jack Allen Sports Complex.

Republican Representative Mike Jones of Andalusia is taking over as chairman of the House Rules Committee.House Speaker Mac McCutcheon announced the appointment Wednesday.Jones is perhaps best known for organizing the House Judiciary Committee's impeachment investigation of former Governor Robert Bentley.  Bentley resigned the same day the committee began hearings.McCutcheon said Jones showed "attention to detail and fairness" during the difficult task that won him praise from colleagues.   

Merlin D. Tuttle, Bat Conservation International

A disease that's affecting bats nationwide has been found in a species in Alabama for the first time. 

 A statement from the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources says white-nose syndrome has now been detected in the southeastern bat.

wikipedia

When Donald Trump won the presidency many were curious to see who would be the big winners and the big losers. It looks like Alabama’s defense industry may do very well when the upcoming budget is hashed out.               

The U.S. Supreme Court has issued a temporary stay on the execution of an Alabama prison inmate.

The nation's high court stayed the execution of Tommy Arthur, "pending further order" from the justices, late Thursday afternoon. Arthur was scheduled to be executed Thursday evening.

Lawyers for former Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard say his ethics conviction is "legally baseless" and prosecutors stretched the bounds of the state law to bring charges against him.

 Hubbard's lawyers filed the appeal Wednesday in the Alabama Court of Criminal Appeals. They are seeking to overturn his 2016 conviction on ethics charges.  Hubbard was convicted of wrongly accepting investments, employment and financial advice from people with business before the Alabama Legislature.

 Alabama lawmakers have given final approval to new legislative districts.

The Alabama Senate voted 21-8 to approve the redistricting legislation. It now goes to Governor Kay Ivey for her signature.

An Alabama county's judges, sheriff and circuit clerk have been sued for allegedly violating the constitutional rights of people charged with misdemeanors and felonies by jailing them if they can't afford to pay bail.

 The lawsuit notes that those who face the same charges but can afford the bail amounts are freed until trial.

Tomorrow marks 20 years since President Bill Clinton formally apologized on behalf of the U.S. government for the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment.

The purpose of this study was to observe the natural progression of untreated syphilis in rural African-American men in Alabama. The study began in 1932 and lasted until 1972, after a whistleblower exposed information about the research to the press and prompted the government to shut down the program.

A conference committee will decide what to do with an Alabama bill that would prevent Confederate monuments from being taken down. 

The group of will try to resolve House and Senate differences in the bill that would prohibit the removal of any historic marker or monument.

The House of Representatives on Thursday appointed conference committee members so the panel can meet in the final week of the legislative session.

The bill comes as some Southern cities consider taking down Confederate monuments.

Finalists have been named for a literary award named for the late Alabama author Harper Lee. 

The University of Alabama law school and the American Bar Association Journal have named three books that are being considered for the Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction.

The annual award is given to a work of fiction that shows the role of attorneys in society and their power to bring about change.

The finalists are: "Gone Again" by James Grippando; "Small Great Things" by Jodi Picoult; and "The Last Days of Night" by Graham Moore.

A prison construction plan is headed to a key vote in committee.    The House Judiciary Committee will vote Tuesday on the proposal to build, or lease, up to four prisons in the state.  

 Senator Cam Ward, the bill's sponsor, said the vote is "do or die" for the legislation as lawmakers head into the final week of the legislative session.

The Alabama Senate has approved new legislative districts over the objections of black Democrats who said the plan was gerrymandered to maintain GOP control of the state's largest county. 

Senators on Thursday approved the new districts in a 25-7 party line vote after Democrats used procedural tactics to delay a vote for several hours.

Senators are asking a budget committee to vote this week on an autism bill that would require insurers to pay for an intensive therapy.

Senator Dick Brewbaker of Pike Road said Tuesday that 26 of 35 senators signed a petition asked for a committee vote this week instead of waiting. Brewbaker says the bill deserves a vote because the legislative clock is rapidly winding down

Legislation that would require health insurers to cover an intensive autism therapy has stalled in the state Senate after passing the House of Representatives unanimously.

The House on April 20 voted 100-0 to mandate coverage of applied behavioral analysis therapy, also called ABA therapy. However, the bill was not assigned to a Senate committee until a week later and the committee chairman said it will be another week before the bill has a public hearing.

Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore is running for the U.S. Senate.

Moore made the announcement on the steps of the Alabama Capitol this afternoon.

Speculation has swirled that Moore might run for another office after being suspended from the bench.

Moore will run in what is expected to be a crowded GOP primary to fill the seat vacated by now U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Representatives approved the bill Tuesday with an 84-11 vote. It now moves to the Alabama Senate.

PBS.org

Today is Confederate Memorial Day. Many across the South will recognize Confederate soldiers who fell during the Civil War. It’s one of three of these uniquely Southern holidays.  There is some controversy that surrounds these days of observance in Alabama and elsewhere in the South.

 

Confederate Memorial Day and the birthdays of Robert E. Lee Day and Jefferson Davis make up the trio of holidays related to the Civil War.

 

Steve Murray is the director of the Alabama Archives and History. He says Confederate Memorial Day has a long history…   

Alabama is expanding its Amber Alert guidelines for missing children.    Governor Kay Ivey says Alabama will no longer wait for a missing child to be reported "abducted" for an Amber Alert to be issued.

The decision comes after an incident in Bessemer on Wednesday where a vehicle with a child inside was stolen but did not immediately qualify for the alert.

Alabama lawmakers have voted to require high schoolers pass a civics exam before graduating.

The Alabama House of Representatives passed the bill 68-31 Tuesday. 

 Decatur Republican Representative Terri Collins says her legislation is intended to ensure young people know how their government works.

The exams will be introduced during the next school year and are identical to the naturalization test given by the federal government. Students could take the 100 question quiz until they pass it.

Stan Ingold

All year long on Alabama Public Radio we’re looking back on pivotal moments in the fight for civil rights. Many of the landmarks in the battle against segregation can voter discrimination are now tourist attractions. We have already looked at sites in Selma and Montgomery on Alabama’s Civil Rights Trail and now we head to Birmingham.

Alabama lawmakers delayed a vote on a proposed gas tax increase to pay for road and bridge construction after the bill ran into heavy opposition.  

 House Speaker Mac McCutcheon says the bill is likely dead for the session.

The Alabama Senate has voted to allow a church to form its own police force.    Lawmakers on Tuesday voted 24-4 to allow Briarwood Presbyterian Church in Birmingham to establish a law enforcement department.  

The church says it needs its own police officers to keep its school as well as its more than 4,000 person congregation safe.

 Veteran Affairs health benefits have been extended to more than 142,000 veterans living in rural Alabama. 

Al.com reports that the extension of federal program was approved by Congress to allow vets living more than a certain distance from a VA facility to seek private medical care outside of the Department of Veteran Affairs. The program was voted to allow the program to last until the $1 billion within the program is used up.

Congress voted on the program's extension on Wednesday.

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