Stan Ingold

Assistant News Director

Born in Morehead Kentucky, Stan Ingold got his start in public radio as a volunteer at Morehead State Public Radio.  He worked there throughout his college career as a reporter, host and producer and was hired on as the Morning Edition Host after graduating with a degree in History from Morehead State University. He remained there for nearly three years. Along with working in radio he spent a great deal of time coaching speech and forensics at Rowan County Senior High School in Morehead, working with students and teaching them broadcasting techniques for competitions. 

Stan arrived at Alabama Public Radio in March of 2011. Since then he has been busy criscrossing the state gathering news stories and bringing them to you, the listener. His story on the Key Underwood Coondog Memorial Cemetery recently earned him a regional Edward R Murrow Award for Feature Reporting.

Ways to Connect

A study by Alabama researchers is looking at a potential method for reducing the number of gun suicides in the United States.

A report published by the American Association of Suicidology suggests that many patients at risk for killing themselves would voluntarily place their names on a list of people who can't purchase firearms.   

That could be important since guns account for about half of all suicides, and suicide was the tenth-leading cause of death in the United States in 2013.

Encyclopedia of Alabama

 The first black person to attend the University of Alabama, Autherine Lucy Foster, is among four people who are being honored as the newest members of the university's Alabama Educator Hall of Fame.

The group was honored at a ceremony Saturday night at NorthRiver Yacht Club in Tuscaloosa.  

Foster became the first black person to attend Alabama in 1956. Campus riots broke out and the university removed her. Foster's expulsion was reversed in 1988, and she graduated from Alabama with a master's degree in elementary education in 1992.

Alabama voters on Election Day will have their say on 14 proposed statewide amendments. One of those is aimed at protecting money for the Yellowhammer State's twenty one state parks.

Amendment 2 would prohibit money generated at state parks— as well as tax dollars earmarked for park maintenance — from being transferred to other government functions. It would also allow more private entities to run hotels, golf courses and restaurants at the parks.

Alabama's first female lieutenant governor, Democrat Lucy Baxley, has died.

A statement released by Baxley's family says she died Friday at home. She was 78. Baxley was elected lieutenant governor and presided over the Senate during a four-year term that began in 2003.

She was the Democratic nominee for governor in 2006 but lost to Republican Bob Riley. Baxley served as state treasurer before becoming lieutenant governor and she was elected president of the Alabama Public Service Commission in 2008 despite having suffered a serious stroke after her gubernatorial bid.

Stan Ingold

For many prisoners at the Limestone Correctional Facility, the heavy bang of a steel gate is the first thing they hear when they enter the Alabama prison system. It’s also the last thing when they come out.

         “They give you a bus ticket and a check for ten dollars and they say “Have a nice life.”

That’s Brenda Lee Kennedy. She was incarcerated in the Montgomery Work Release Center for nearly five and half years before being released in November of last year.

Alabama’s Chief Justice of the Supreme Court has been immediately suspended for the rest of his term without pay. Moore was found guilty of all six charges leveled against him.

Prosecutors said Moore issued an order to the state’s sixty-eight probate judges in January to defy the U.S. Supreme Court ruling declaring same sex marriage legal nationwide. 

Moore was removed from office in 2003 in a dispute over a granite monument of the Ten Commandments. This judicial ethics court did not have the unanimous support necessary to permanently  remove Moore.

 A 100-year-old building in downtown Montgomery is expected to be turned into hotel.

The Montgomery Advertiser reports that the wedge-shaped Bishop-Parker building across from Riverwalk Stadium will be turned into a Springhill Suites hotel. Developers plan to spend $14 million on the project.  

Renovation work will start near the end of the year and take about 14 months. One of the developers says the exterior will remain mostly untouched to keep the building's "historic charm" to balance the "modern and urban feel."

Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore heads to court this week on accusations that he misused his office to try to block gay couples from marrying in Alabama.

The Alabama Court of the Judiciary, a panel that disciplines judges, on Wednesday will hear testimony and arguments in the case against Moore.    

The Judicial Inquiry Commission in May accused Moore of violating the canons of judicial ethics. The charges stem from his January order to probate judges that a state court order to marriage licenses to gay couples remained in effect.

 Dabney Montgomery, who served with the all-black Tuskegee Airmen in World War II and marched with Martin Luther King Jr., has died. He was 93.

His wife, Amelia Montgomery, said he died of natural causes Saturday morning at a Manhattan hospice care facility. He had lived in Harlem until he entered the facility August 25th.

Montgomery was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2007.         

 Alabama's attempt to rebuild its beachfront state park using oil spill money is again embroiled in controversy. 

Businessman Tom Schlinkert says officials are shutting down his zip line adventure ride at Gulf State Park in Gulf  Shores and refusing him $40,000 in compensation as construction continues on a new coastal hotel. That project is being funded in part with BP money, even though a hurricane destroyed the old lodge years before the oil spill.

The Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind Foundation has received a one million dollar gift from an anonymous donor.

The Gadsden Times reports the gift received Monday will be used to develop a new agriculture center. The center will focus on giving students hands-on training to help them develop skills related to agriculture.

The center will be located on 20-plus acres behind the Helen Keller School.  

A hearing Monday will determine the course of the judicial ethics case against suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore.

The Alabama Court of the Judiciary is set to consider a request by judicial investigators to convict Moore of violating canons of conduct without a trial. That could result in Moore's immediate removal from office.


Moore opposes the request, and lawyers will present arguments during a hearing. The court says Moore's trial will begin September 28th if the case continues.

Stan Ingold

An E-F-5 tornado ripped through the small northwest Alabama community leveling much of the town.  

“This is one of the hardest hit areas, you see, it looks like land has been cleared, especially this area we’re fixing to go to over here.

Police Chief Merrell Potter and I drove around Phil Campbell to survey the damage…

It looks like, almost like pasture land that’s just been cleared off, you can tell there used to be houses there but the green grass is starting to grow up through the debris that has been cleared.”

Stan Ingold

  2013 marks the fiftieth anniversary of a number of key moments in the fight for civil rights. Alabama Public Radio’s Stan Ingold recently began a trek to several spots around the state that are linked to the civil rights struggle. Visitors from around the world are coming to these sites as tourists. Stan recently took us to Selma and this time we look at Montgomery where to voting rights march took place.

Stan Ingold

All year long on Alabama Public Radio we’re looking back on pivotal moments in the fight for civil rights. Many of the landmarks in the battle against segregation can voter discrimination are now tourist attractions. We have already looked at sites in Selma and Montgomery on Alabama’s Civil Rights Trail and now we head to Birmingham.

Stan Ingold

       There are many reasons people visit Alabama, to see sporting events, the space connection in Huntsville or the beaches along the gulf coast. However, civil rights tourism is often overlooked by the masses. This dark time in the state’s history is drawing visitors from all over.

Visitors like Betty and Phil Histon from Corvallis Oregon. They’re in Alabama, like many tourists, to try the local barbecue and the see the sites. When we met them they were in the Civil Rights Interpretive Center is Selma…

The Cuddle Party

Aug 3, 2016

We live in a time and society where touching someone is usually associated with one thing, and that’s sex. However there is a growing trend aimed at removing the stigma of physical contact. Alabama Public Radio’s Stan Ingold  did some research and has this report on an activity known as the “Cuddle Party.”

Governor Robert Bentley is calling for a special session of the state legislature.  He wants to focus on Alabama's financial woes and says the focus of the session will be on passing legislation to allow Alabamians to vote on a state lottery. The Governor released the video below this morning...

High-profile lawyers have been named to both sides in the impeachment investigation against Governor Robert Bentley, and Alabama's taxpayers will foot the bill.

Bentley's office announced  that it is hiring Ross Garber, who represented the governors of South Carolina and Connecticut during impeachment proceedings.                     

Alabama's House Judiciary Committee named Birmingham attorney Jackson Sharman as its special counsel. That's a role he had with the U.S. House Banking Committee for the Whitewater investigation during the Clinton administration.

Two campers from Alabama have been arrested in connection with a wildfire that has destroyed three homes and three buildings north of Nederland in Boulder County. 

Boulder sheriff's deputies said Sunday afternoon that 28 year old Jimmy Andrew Suggs, and 26 year old Zackary Ryan Kuykendall,  both of whom are from Vinemont, Alabama face felony arson charges because of the dangers the fire poses, the Denver Post reported The men were booked into the Boulder County Jail, the newspaper reported.

The construction of a new hangar and support facility could increase the workforce by as many as 200 employees. reports that Yulista broke ground on a 60,000-square-foot aviation hangar and 20,000-square-foot support facility at the Huntsville Executive Airport on Friday. The expansion will bring the airport's aviation campus from 94,000 square feet to more than 165,000 square feet.  

The Yulista M5 Hangar is expected to be fully operational by 2017. The expansion took two years.

Four years and eight years probation.  That is the sentenced handed down to Former Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard after being convicted of twelve of twenty-three felony ethics charges last month.

The State says Hubbard improperly solicited lobbyists and company executives for consulting contracts and using his political office to benefit his clients.                      

Defense Lawyer Bill Baxley defended Hubbard’s Character after the sentenced was delivered….

Former Al House Speaker Mike Hubbard

Former Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard has been sentenced to four years in prison with eight years of probation. Hubbard will have to two hundred-ten-thousand dollars in fines.

Since there is an appeal bond pending, Hubbard was not taken into custody.

We will have more on this story as it develops.

Customers at more than 120 Walmart locations across Alabama will be able to checkout using their smartphones.

Customers could start using Walmart Pay as early as Thursday. Company spokeswoman Molly Blakeman told the service also rolled out in three other southern states including Georgia, Louisiana and Mississippi.


Walmart Pay is already available in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. It will soon be available nationwide.

Members of the Alabama Legislature will elect a new House speaker in February, possibly sooner if Governor Bentley calls a special session.  

Contenders for the job are beginning to emerge after former House Speaker Mike Hubbard was removed from office after being convicted on twelve ethics charges.

Lee County Sheriff's Office

A jury has convicted Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard on 12 charges of violating the state ethics law.

The jury returned the verdict Friday evening after deliberating for seven hours. Sentencing is set for next month.


Hubbard faced 23 felony ethics charges accusing him of using political positions as House speaker and chairman of the state GOP to make money and investments from lobbyists and company owners.

The ethics case of Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard is now in the hands of the jury.  APR’s MacKenzie Bates reports from the TK Davis Justice Center in Opelika…  

   Lee County Circuit Judge Jacob Walker handed the case to the jury just before two o’clock this afternoon.  They’re trying to determine if Mike Hubbard used his positions as House Speaker and former state party chair to make money and obtain business and investment for his companies.


More than one million Alabamians are  hoping to put a dent in the current drought.  The northern half of Interstate 20/59 have not had rain in a few weeks, which is causing trouble for farmers and their crops.

Brian Fuchs is a climatologist with the national drought mitigation center at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln.  He says the increasing temperatures can bring storms to the area but there’s a catch…


The prosecution continues to press their case against House Speaker Mike Hubbard. Governor Robert Bentley took the stand as Hubbard defends himself against twenty three felony ethics charges. Prosecutors are trying to prove Hubbard’s acted illegally when he met with Bentley on behalf of two clients. Former state lawmaker and political commentator Steve Flowers attended the proceedings. He says prosecutors spent time on Bentley’s perceptions of his meeting with Hubbard…   

Governor Robert Bentley has testified under oath in the ethics trial of the Alabama house speaker. Bentley says he remembers meeting with Mike Hubbard to discuss what he described as economic development projects.   

Prosecutors are seeking to prove that Hubbard was being paid up to $12,000 a month to illegally lobby the governor on behalf of his business clients - a municipal gas company and a maker of plastic cups.