Stan Ingold

Assistant News Director

Born in Morehead Kentucky, Stan Ingold got his start in public radio as a volunteer at Morehead State Public Radio.  He worked there throughout his college career as a reporter, host and producer and was hired on as the Morning Edition Host after graduating with a degree in History from Morehead State University. He remained there for nearly three years. Along with working in radio he spent a great deal of time coaching speech and forensics at Rowan County Senior High School in Morehead, working with students and teaching them broadcasting techniques for competitions. 

Stan arrived at Alabama Public Radio in March of 2011. Since then he has been busy criscrossing the state gathering news stories and bringing them to you, the listener. His story on the Key Underwood Coondog Memorial Cemetery recently earned him a regional Edward R Murrow Award for Feature Reporting.

Ways to Connect

Alabama State Capitol
Stan Ingold / APR

Alabama lawmakers are beginning the final two days of the legislative session with some major decisions before them.

Governor Robert Bentley's $800 million prison construction plan, proposed payday lending regulations and a division of oil spill settlement funds are among the top issues that will be decided. Lawmakers return to Montgomery Tuesday.   

 A proposed split of the oil spill settlement money is facing critical votes this week. The Senate will consider a House-passed plan to use the money to pay state debts and for road projects in coastal Alabama

Stan Ingold

All week long on Alabama Public Radio we’re looking at the progress of people and areas five years after the devastating April 27th 2011 tornadoes.  Tuscaloosa got a lot of the attention during the disaster. But, it wasn’t the only community hit hard.  A-P-R’s Stan Ingold has gone back to the small town of Phil Campbell to see if time has healed some of the wounds…

An E-F-5 tornado ripped through the small northwest Alabama community leveling much of the town.  

Stan Ingold

 

It has been nearly five years since a massive EF-4 tornado ripped through Tuscaloosa Alabama. Twelve percent of the city was destroyed and seven thousand people became unemployed. Here is a look at what recovery has been like for those who decided to come back and those who did not…

 

justice.gov

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley is facing another hurdle this week.

State Auditor Jim Zeigler has filed an ethics complaint against Bentley and Bentley’s senior political advisor Rebekah Caldwell Mason.  A-L-dot-com reports Zeigler’s complaint is the about the possible misuse of state property by the Governor, and whether Mason should be considered a public official or a lobbyist.

 A north Alabama school superintendent says a state law regarding virtual schools needs to be clarified to allow state funding to follow the students.

The Decatur Daily reports that Athens City Schools Superintendent Trey Holladay says he believes virtual schools should receive funding if they are fully educating students. Two Morgan County superintendents say more time is needed to allow systems to get used to virtual school rules before any funding changes are made.

 

Alabama voters head to the polls next week to name their picks for presidential nominees.

Super Tuesday, with contests in 12 states, represents the biggest single-day delegate haul in the entire nomination process. This also marks what is known as the SEC Primary where several southern states brought their elections dates together to draw more interest from the candidates. Hillary Clinton, Marco Rubio, Donald Trump and Ben Carson all plan stops in Alabama before Tuesday's election.

“Revelation: A Search for Faith in a Violent Religious World”

Author: Dennis Covington   

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company

Pages: 224

Price: $28.00 (Hardcover)

Impossible as it seems, it has been 20 years since Dennis Covington published “Salvation on Sand Mountain,” his report on the snake handling churches of Appalachia, those congregations that followed, literally, the passage in Mark: “They shall take up serpents.”

Seventy six schools in Alabama are wondering what’s next after they were a list of failing schools. The state education department used different criteria for determining failing schools. The current list ranked schools as passing or failing based on last year’s ACT test reading and math scores. That led to ten more schools than last year being included on the list. Dr. Clarence Sutton is the principal of Tuscaloosa’s Central High School, which made the list this year. He takes issue with referring to the schools as “failing”.

     

     Troy University will observe Black History Month with its 2016 Leadership Conference starting tonight. Actor, dancer and director Jasmine Guy will deliver a keynote speech during the event. Attendees will also hear from Juanita Jones Abernathy. She’s the widow of the Reverend Ralph Abernathy. City of Troy spokesman Isaiah Scott says the conference continues to improve each year with more speakers and activities.

A Muslim advocacy group is asking to meet with  Governor Robert Bentley about statements he made on a refugee resettlement program that they call insensitive.

During his State of the State address Tuesday, Bentley criticized the federal refugee resettlement program for not disclosing refugees' background information to officials in states they settle in.

Bentley mentioned terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, California, and said one of the killers and some refugees in Alabama came from "terrorist nations."

Stan Ingold

       

The National Weather Service is confirming that two tornadoes hit west central Alabama last night. An EF-2 storm struck parts of Pickens County, destroying thirteen homes. A second tornado was confirmed as an EF-1. That twister tore through Fayette County. No deaths are reported from either storm. Today’s damage report was made after assessment teams surveyed the area. Forecaster Jason Holmes says even the trees in this rural area can provide clues as to what happened…

Much of Alabama is under threat of severe weather this afternoon and evening. The National Weather Service is predicting damaging winds of up to 70 miles per hour this afternoon. The forecast also includes hail and the possibility of isolated tornadoes. Several school districts across north and central Alabama dismissed early or canceled after-school activities in anticipation of the storms. John de Block is the warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Birmingham. He says the storm threat will continue well into the overnight hours.

Walmart.com

The Alabama Joint Transportation Committee will be in Dothan to discuss the state’s infrastructure as well as ways to fund repairs and constructions. One proposal is an increase in the state’s gasoline tax. That’s expected to be a hot topic in the upcoming legislative session starting next week.

Representative Mac McCutcheon is the chairman of the Joint Transportation Committee. He says committee members will definitely consider public input when it’s time to write legislation.

skysports.com

 

Tuscaloosa native and World Boxing Council Heavyweight Champion Deontay Wilder defended his title in Brooklyn, New York knocking out Artur Szpilka of Poland in the ninth round. 

While Wilder was the heavy favorite to win the bout, Szpilka was a crowd favorite with chants and singing early on.  

Wilder was leading on all three scorecards 78-74, 77-75 and 78-74 after eight rounds but it was a right hand from the champion that dropped Szpilka towards the end of the ninth round.

 

An Alabama police officer acquitted of using excessive force on an Indian man still faces state and federal charges, but legal experts say the outcome of the civil rights trial will likely influence the approach to those cases.

U.S. District Judge Madeline Haikala granted a motion to acquit Madison police officer Eric Parker Wednesday after two previous trials ended in hung juries.

Parker was accused of violating 58-year-old Sureshbhai Patel's civil rights when he slammed him to the ground during a suspicious person investigation in February.

       

The Alabama Department of Public Health will be holding a town hall meeting tonight to discuss an outbreak of Tuberculosis.  Twenty-six people have been diagnosed in the Marion, Centreville and Tuscaloosa areas in the past two years.  Pam Barrett is the Director for the Division of TB control with the Alabama Department of Public Health. She says keeping track of those infected has been a problem.

historymakers.com

Ozell Sutton, a longtime civil rights activist who was associated with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., has died. He was 90. 

His daughter, Alta Sutton, told The Associated Press on Sunday her father died at Saint Joseph Hospital in Atlanta on Saturday. She said the family had celebrated his birthday nearly a week ago. Ozell Sutton marched for equal rights alongside King in Selma, Alabama, in 1965 and was present at the Memphis hotel where King was assassinated in 1968.

A push for casino gambling in Alabama has lost its highest profile advocate in the Alabama Legislature.

Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh says he won't sponsor casino legislation in the upcoming session as he had originally planned.

Marsh says he did not think the votes were there for the casino legislation so he will move on in the upcoming session.

The Republican Senate leader said hoped that lawmakers would consider casinos because of the potential revenue for the state.

tripadvisor.com

The life-size bronze sculpture of Rosa Parks has received a makeover.

With the 60th anniversary of the Montgomery bus boycott on Tuesday, sculptor Erik Blome recently returned to touch up the sculpture 15 years after the statue was placed in the Rosa Parks Museum in Montgomery. The sculpture was touched up after wearing down and losing some color from constant touching and interaction.

The Montgomery Advertiser reports that Blome touched up the sculpture Nov. 19. The sculpture depicts Parks sitting on a bus seat, hands settled on a purse in her lap.

A new survey shows the majority of U.S. military veterans aren’t happy with the treatment they get after their service. The Disabled Veterans Pulse Survey found that only 1 in 5 veterans think the government treats them well.

Less than half believe they receive the benefits and support they were promised. Dan Clare is the National Director of Communications for the group Disabled American Veterans. He says many veterans out repeat their service.

Unemployment in Alabama is down slightly and wages are higher than it’s been in seven years. A-P-R student reporter Nia Craig has more on the state's employment rates…

 

Employment has increased by 7,200 jobs. According to the governor’s office the state’s jobless rate for October was 5.9 percent. This is one-tenth of a point from 6 percent in September.

 

The government sector has gained more than half of these jobs. There were also increases in the professional and business services area, plus the trade and transportation sector.

 

Governor Robert Bentley has announced he is refusing Syrian refugees relocating to Alabama.

In a news release Sunday Bentley said, "After full consideration of this weekend's attacks of terror on innocent citizens in Paris, I will oppose any attempt to relocate Syrian refugees to Alabama through the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. As your Governor, I will not stand complicit to a policy that places the citizens of Alabama in harm's way."

ua.edu

Elected officials and the family and friends of Mal Moore will gather today, for the dedication of the Mal Moore Memorial Highway.

www.nasa.gov

 NASA has named an interim director to lead the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville.

NASA officials say that Todd May has been named to the post after the retirement of former director Patrick Scheuermann.

May has served as the space center's deputy director since August and had managed the Space Launch System Program since 2011. Officials say May started his career with NASA in 1991 at the Materials and Processes lab at Marshall.

Bush Making an SEC Push

Oct 11, 2015

 

 

Jeb Bush is getting a jump on the so-called SEC primary by visiting  campuses in Southern states that vote for the GOP's presidential nominee on March 1st.

On Saturday, the former Florida governor gave a pitch for his candidacy before the Volunteers hosted Number 19 Georgia.

Bush spoke to hundreds of orange-clad fans who gathered for his speech two hours before the opening kickoff.

After just a few minutes, Bush ended his remarks and pledged to take as many selfies as humanly possible. He spent the next half-hour or so doing just that.

 

The future looks bright for the tourism industry in Mobile.

City leaders are touting the return of Carnival Cruise Lines to the city next year, the new GulfQuest Maritime Museum just opened near the downtown cruise terminal, and the region's is economy looks good. Despite its rich history, antebellum architecture and emerging art and music scene, locals say Mobile has long been overlooked by tourists heading west to New Orleans or east to the Florida Panhandle.

 

A federal judge says the state of Alabama may not use a large dose of a sedative to execute five death row inmates.

U.S. District Judge William Keith Watkins issued an order Thursday denying the state's requests to dismiss lawsuits from five inmates who have challenged Alabama three-drug lethal injection procedure. The inmates were asked to present alternative means of execution and among other things suggested single doses of midazolam in amended complaints.

phys.org

NASA’s new rocket program designed to eventually carry astronauts to Mars has a new   

  man at the helm. APR’s Alex AuBuchon has more.

            John Honeycutt has been named the new manager of NASA’s Space Launch System program.

            The program is currently in development at Huntsville’s Marshall Space Flight Center and aims to construct the largest rockets ever built.

       

The subject of cyber security is taking center stage in Huntsville today. The University of Alabama at Huntsville is hosting a cyber security summit to raise awareness on different types of cyber threats. Joyce Vance is the United States district attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. She says it is important for people to report cyber threats or attacks they come in contact with.

Eric Parker
Brynn Anderson / AP

A court date has been set for a Madison police officer accused of slamming an Indian man to the ground.

Limestone County District Court records say a status conference in the assault case of 27-year-old Eric Parker is set for December 9th, as federal prosecutors plan a retrial on a civil rights charge.

Authorities say Parker slammed 58-year-old Sureshbhai Patel to the ground February 6th. During the federal trial in Huntsville, Parker said Patel defied orders and resisted during a suspicious person investigation.

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