Robert Krulwich

Robert Krulwich works on radio, podcasts, video, the blogosphere. He has been called "the most inventive network reporter in television" by TV Guide.

Krulwich is a Science Correspondent for NPR. His NPR blog, "Krulwich Wonders" features drawings, cartoons and videos that illustrate hard-to-see concepts in science.

He is the co-host of Radiolab, a nationally distributed radio/podcast series that explores new developments in science for people who are curious but not usually drawn to science shows. "There's nothing like it on the radio," says Ira Glass of This American Life, "It's a act of crazy genius." Radiolab won a Peabody Award in 2011.

His specialty is explaining complex subjects, science, technology, economics, in a style that is clear, compelling and entertaining. On television he has explored the structure of DNA using a banana; on radio he created an Italian opera, "Ratto Interesso" to explain how the Federal Reserve regulates interest rates; he has pioneered the use of new animation on ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight.

For 22 years, Krulwich was a science, economics, general assignment and foreign correspondent at ABC and CBS News.

He won Emmy awards for a cultural history of the Barbie doll, for a Frontline investigation of computers and privacy, a George Polk and Emmy for a look at the Savings & Loan bailout online advertising and the 2010 Essay Prize from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Krulwich earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Oberlin College and a law degree from Columbia University.

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Krulwich Wonders...
4:48 am
Sat May 18, 2013

David Foster Wallace Tells Us About Freedom

YouTube

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 10:24 am

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Krulwich Wonders...
8:56 am
Fri May 17, 2013

What Did I Do Last Summer? Oh, I Discovered How To Make Babies Without Sex. And You?

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 10:26 am

Ah, if only all summers could be like June, July and August 1740 — when three young guys (and a 6-year-old and a 3-year-old) did a science experiment that startled the world. In those days, you could do biology without a fancy diploma. More people could play.

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Krulwich Wonders...
8:51 am
Tue May 14, 2013

What Is It About Bees And Hexagons?

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 12:26 pm

Solved! A bee-buzzing, honey-licking 2,000-year-old mystery that begins here, with this beehive. Look at the honeycomb in the photo and ask yourself: (I know you've been wondering this all your life, but have been too shy to ask out loud ... ) Why is every cell in this honeycomb a hexagon?

Bees, after all, could build honeycombs from rectangles or squares or triangles ...

But for some reason, bees choose hexagons. Always hexagons.

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Krulwich Wonders...
5:02 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Astronomy's Little Secret: The Hidden Art Of 'Moonsweeping'

La Luna

A few nights ago, (Wednesday, I think, around midnight), I was by my window looking up, and there, hanging in the sky, I saw the moon. Not all of it, just what the almanac used to call "a crescent" — what my mom called a "toenail moon." The whole moon, I knew, was up there, hidden in shadow. The crescent part was facing the sun. That's the part you can see at the beginning of each month, my second grade teacher, Mrs. Elkins taught us, using a flashlight and a tennis ball to demonstrate the phases of the moon. Scotty Miller, I remember, got to hold the tennis ball. Mrs.

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:03 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Music, Inside Out

Daniel Sierra Oscillate/Vimeo

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 10:40 am

What would it be like to be a string that made music? Not anything simple, like a guitar string or a cello string, but a magical string, a sine curve that's taut then loose, that doubles then doubles again, that sheds then dissolves into showers of notes — a flaming, sighing, looping, dissolving string. Curious?

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Krulwich Wonders...
8:20 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Moths That Drive Cars (Really)

YouTube

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 9:07 am

What you are about to see — and I'm not making this up — is a moth driving a car.

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Krulwich Wonders...
9:48 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Wildlife That Isn't Wild And Isn't Alive

YouTube

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 1:33 pm

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:53 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Our Very Normal Solar System Isn't Normal Anymore

Robert Krulwich NPR

Some things you just count on. Like if we ever meet a space alien, it should have eyes (and maybe a head). Like somewhere out there, there are planets like ours. Like we have an ordinary solar system — "ordinary" because you know what it looks like ...

It's got a sun in the middle, little planets on the inside, bigger ones farther out. That's what most of them should look like, no?

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Krulwich Wonders...
10:45 am
Tue April 30, 2013

The Boomerang Rocket Ship: Shoot It Up, Back It Comes

YouTube

What in heaven's name is happening here?

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:03 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Nobody Throws Balls Like Yu

Jeff Gross Getty Images

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Krulwich Wonders...
12:23 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Oh The Horror! Famished Silly Putty Devours Innocent Magnets

Vimeo

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 5:11 pm

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:03 am
Sun April 21, 2013

A Wet Towel In Space Is Not Like A Wet Towel On Earth

YouTube

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 9:20 am

You just don't know (because who's going to tell you?) that when you leave Earth, travel outside its gravitational reach, hundreds and hundreds of everyday things — stuff you've never had to think about — will change. Like ... oh, how about a wet washcloth?

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:18 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Monkeys, Mai Tais And Us

YouTube

Some of us can't say no — and I'm using "us" in the broadest sense, to include not just humans, but wallabies, fruit flies, birds and monkeys. We can't control our appetites.

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Krulwich Wonders...
8:25 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Trees On Top Of Skyscrapers? Yes! Yes, Say I. No! No, Says Tim

Boeri Studio

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 8:35 am

This isn't finished. But it will be. Two residential towers, dense with trees, will have their official opening later this year in downtown Milan, Italy, near the Porta Garibaldi railroad station. (The image is not a photograph, but an architect's rendering. The towers are built and the trees are going in right now.) I love this. I think these towers are gorgeous. Milan is a very polluted town; these trees will cleanse the air, pumping out oxygen and greening the cityscape.

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Krulwich Wonders...
10:55 am
Wed April 17, 2013

A 'Whom Do You Hang With?' Map Of America

MIT Senseable City - "The Connected States of America"
MIT Senseable City Lab

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 12:31 pm

Look at the center of this map, at the little red dot that marks Kansas City. Technically, Kansas City is at the edge of Missouri, but here on this map it's in the upper middle section of a bigger space with strong blue borders. We don't have a name for this bigger space yet, but soon we will.

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