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Author Interviews
4:21 am
Sat June 13, 2015

Lawyer Argues That Virtual Trials Would Make Justice System More Fair

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 1:18 pm

The death of Kalief Browder shined more harsh light on the American justice system. Browder was held at New York's Rikers Island prison complex for three years after being accused of stealing a backpack at 16. He was never tried, much less convicted, but spent nearly two years in solitary confinement and was savaged by gangs. Browder was finally released with no charges in 2013, but suffered aftereffects from incarceration.

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Television
3:57 am
Fri June 12, 2015

Strange Magic Bubbles Up In New 'Mr Norrell' Adaptation

Eddie Marsan plays the reclusive magician Gilbert Norrell in a new TV adaptation of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norell.
Matt Squire BBC/JSMN Ltd

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 2:05 pm

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Author Interviews
3:25 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Napoleon In America: Not As Strange As It Sounds

Robert Siegel interviews Munro Price, author of Napoleon: End of Glory about napoleon's failed plan to relocate to America after the defeat at Waterloo.
Courtesy of OUP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 9:25 am

Here's a preposterous idea: Napoleon Bonaparte, defeated at Waterloo, his 15-year run as dictator, conqueror and self-crowned emperor at an end, escapes to the United States. Well, as preposterous as that idea might sound, 200 years ago this month, Napoleon Bonaparte was thinking precisely that thought: Flee to America. How serious was he, and what would he have done if he'd become a Jersey boy? Munro Price is a professor of modern European history at Bradford University in England and the author of Napoleon: End of Glory.

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Author Interviews
2:54 am
Tue June 9, 2015

If Jimmy Fallon Gets His Way, 'Your Baby's First Word Will Be Dada'

Fallon's new book has a daddy bee, dog, rabbit, cat and donkey (one of his personal favorites) all trying — and failing — to get their babies to say "dada."
Macmillan Children's Publishing Group

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 9:16 am

A lot of things seem to come easy for The Tonight Show's Jimmy Fallon: comedy, music, dancing. Fatherhood didn't. Fallon and his wife struggled with fertility issues for years before they had their two daughters. Now one is almost 2, the other is not yet 1 and both are the inspiration for Fallon's new children's book, Your Baby's First Word Will Be Dada.

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Michel Martin, Going There
2:31 am
Tue June 9, 2015

The #BlackLivesMatter Movement: Marches And Tweets For Healing

Desiree Griffiths of Miami holds up a sign reading "Black Lives Matter" during a protest over the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 1:02 pm

In 2013, after George Zimmerman was acquitted for killing 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, a young woman in California named Alicia Garza wrote an emotional Facebook post that ended with the words "Our Lives Matter, Black Lives Matter." Her friend, Patrisse Cullors, turned that into a hashtag.

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Author Interviews
4:18 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

This 'Book Of Numbers' Speaks A Human Language

Penguin Random House

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 5:56 pm

Describing what Joshua Cohen's sprawling, comic, tragic new novel is actually about isn't easy. In fact, it's tempting to use the old joke: It's about 600 pages. But Cohen gets there first; he does indeed use that joke in Book of Numbers.

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All Tech Considered
3:45 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Online Health Searches Aren't Always Confidential

A researcher found that online medical searches may be seen by hidden parties, and the data sold for profit.
Stuart Kinlough Ikon Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 2:57 pm

In the privacy of a doctor's office, a patient can ask any question and have it be covered under doctor-patient confidentiality. But what happens when patients want to search possible symptoms of a disease or ailment online?

It's common to search for treatments for a migraine or stomach pain on WebMD, or a flu strain on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. But there's no way to know who else may be privy to that search information. So where do the data go when a patient presses enter?

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Music News
2:14 am
Mon June 8, 2015

Amid Violence In Baghdad, A Musician Creates A One-Man Vigil

Karim Wasfi, conductor of the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra, at his home in Baghdad, has been playing his cello at the sites of explosive attacks in Baghdad.
Ahmed Qusay for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 10:29 am

The roar of a car bomb has been the prelude to Karim Wasfi's performances of late.

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Author Interviews
4:31 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

In Debut Novel, Air Force Officer Questions How We Honor Our Veterans

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Sun June 7, 2015 5:21 pm

Why do we honor combat veterans? In his new novel, Air Force officer Jesse Goolsby asks that question through the stories of three veterans, their experiences in war and their lives back at home.

I'd Walk with My Friends If I Could Find Them is grounded in the wars of the last 15 years, but Goolsby points out the action takes place as much in the private lives the men lead in America as it does on the battlefield.

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All Tech Considered
4:28 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

What Makes Algorithms Go Awry?

By clicking "Like" and commenting on Facebook posts, users signal the social network's algorithm that they care about something. That in turn helps influence what they see later. Algorithms like that happen all over the web — and the programs can reflect human biases.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 1:23 pm

Like it or not, much of what we encounter online is mediated by computer-run algorithms — complex formulas that help determine our Facebook feeds, Netflix recommendations, Spotify playlists or Google ads.

But algorithms, like humans, can make mistakes. Last month, users found the photo-sharing site Flickr's new image-recognition technology was labeling dark-skinned people as "apes" and auto-tagging photos of Nazi concentration camps as "jungle gym" and "sport."

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Author Interviews
6:40 am
Sun June 7, 2015

Deep Connections Link The Stories In 'Louisa Meets Bear'

Originally published on Sun June 7, 2015 11:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
6:40 am
Sun June 7, 2015

Dante Guides A Husband Through Grief 'In A Dark Wood'

Originally published on Sun June 7, 2015 11:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
4:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

'Balm' Looks At Civil War After The Battles, Outside The South

Courtesy of Amistad

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 12:22 pm

Dolen Perkins-Valdez wants to change readers' perspective on the Civil War. Her best-selling debut novel, Wench, explored the lives of slave women — not on Southern plantations, but in a resort for slaveowners' mistresses in Ohio. Her new book, Balm, is set in the postwar period, and it's also in an unexpected place: Chicago.

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Author Interviews
6:37 am
Sat June 6, 2015

A New Judy Blume Novel For Adults Is Always An 'Event'

Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 9:10 am

Judy Blume, the incomparable writer for young adults, has a new novel for adult adults, about something totally unexpected: People falling from the sky, and how that can change onlookers for life in ways they only see when they're grown. In the Unlikely Event is a story told by a chorus of voices — most of them young — beginning with Miri and her mother, Rusty, who see a fireball fall from the sky in Elizabeth, N.J. "It's not my story, but I was 14 years old, the winter of 1951-1952 when this bizarre thing happened," Blume tells NPR's Scott Simon.

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Author Interviews
6:37 am
Sat June 6, 2015

Biker Bars And Holy Rollers Smolder In 'Freedom's Child'

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 11:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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