Marie Cusick

Marie Cusick is the WMHT/Capital Region reporter for the Innovation Trail and 'New York NOW.'

As a television reporter, Marie has covered energy and environmental issues from Wyoming to Pennsylvania.

Marie joins WMHT from her hometown of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where she reported for a cable TV news station. During her time there, she was the creator and host of a weekly series that covered local environmental issues.

Marie previously worked as a reporter and anchor for an ABC affiliate in Casper, Wyoming. She began her broadcasting career as an intern on the assignment desk at WBZ-TV in Boston.

In addition to her reports for 'New York NOW,' Marie contributes radio reporting to NPR and public stations throughout upstate New York, including the Innovation Trail’s partners: WMHT, WXXI, WRVO, WNED and WSKG.

On the side of a mountain road in Pennsylvania's Tiadaghton State Forest, I'm trying to avoid a steady stream of heavy truck traffic. Acres of freshly cut tree stumps stretch out in front of me.

Kevin Heatley lives in the area and has come to these woods for years to hike. He's an ecologist by trade and he's concerned about what he's seeing.

Lancaster County, Pa., is well known for its pastoral landscape, Amish community, and agricultural heritage. Despite this reputation, few local chefs have embraced the farm-to-table concept until recently.

A restaurant called John J. Jeffries, in Lancaster City, was among the first. Although the menu changes seasonally, customers can order the restaurant's version of steak tartare year-round.

This week marks the 150th anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg. While it's widely known as the critical turning point of the Civil War, the small Pennsylvania town has seen many other battles since then — over how the historic site should be preserved and remembered.

Three years ago, a report from the National Academy of Sciences exposed serious problems in the nation's forensic science community. It found not only a lack of peer-reviewed science in the field, but also insufficient oversight in crime laboratories.

Little has changed since that report came out, but concerns are growing as scandals keep surfacing at crime labs across the country.

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